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David C. Knight
University of Alabama at Birmingham
Developmental psychologyPsychologyFear conditioningAmygdalaFunctional magnetic resonance imaging
63Publications
24H-index
2,199Citations
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Publications 65
Newest
#1Yue Zhang (UAB: University of Alabama at Birmingham)H-Index: 12
#2Edward Taub (UAB: University of Alabama at Birmingham)H-Index: 77
Last. David C. Knight (UAB: University of Alabama at Birmingham)H-Index: 24
view all 7 authors...
Assessing brain temperature can provide important information about disease processes (e.g., stroke, trauma) and therapeutic effects (e.g., cerebral hypothermia treatment). Whole-brain magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (WB-MRSI) is increasingly used to quantify brain metabolites across the entire brain. However, its feasibility and reliability for estimating brain temperature needs further validation. Therefore, the present study evaluates the reproducibility of WB-MRSI for temperature ma...
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#1Nathaniel G. Harnett (UAB: University of Alabama at Birmingham)H-Index: 6
#2Adam M. Goodman (UAB: University of Alabama at Birmingham)H-Index: 5
Last. David C. Knight (UAB: University of Alabama at Birmingham)H-Index: 24
view all 3 authors...
Although approximately 90% of the U.S. population will experience a traumatic event within their lifetime, only a fraction of those traumatized individuals will develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In fact, approximately 7 out of 100 people in the U.S. will be afflicted by this debilitating condition, which suggests there is substantial inter-individual variability in susceptibility to PTSD. This uncertainty regarding who is susceptible to PTSD necessitates a thorough understanding of t...
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#1Nathaniel G. Harnett (UAB: University of Alabama at Birmingham)H-Index: 6
#2Muriah D. Wheelock (UAB: University of Alabama at Birmingham)H-Index: 8
Last. David C. Knight (UAB: University of Alabama at Birmingham)H-Index: 24
view all 9 authors...
Abstract Threat-related emotional function is supported by a neural circuit that includes the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus, and amygdala. The function of this neural circuit is altered by negative life experiences, which can potentially affect threat-related emotional processes. Notably, Black-American individuals disproportionately endure negative life experiences compared to White-American individuals. However, the relationships among negative life experiences, race, and the neural sub...
2 CitationsSource
#1Jinhong Guo (OSU: Ohio State University)H-Index: 2
#1Jinhong Guo (OSU: Ohio State University)
Last. David C. Knight (UAB: University of Alabama at Birmingham)H-Index: 24
view all 3 authors...
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#1Tyler R. Orem (UAB: University of Alabama at Birmingham)H-Index: 4
#2Muriah D. Wheelock (UAB: University of Alabama at Birmingham)H-Index: 8
Last. David C. Knight (UAB: University of Alabama at Birmingham)H-Index: 24
view all 9 authors...
4 CitationsSource
#1Nathaniel G. Harnett (UAB: University of Alabama at Birmingham)H-Index: 6
#2Edward W. Ference (UAB: University of Alabama at Birmingham)H-Index: 1
Last. David C. Knight (UAB: University of Alabama at Birmingham)H-Index: 24
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The prefrontal cortex, amygdala, hippocampus, and hypothalamus are important components of the neural network that mediates the healthy learning, expression, and regulation of emotion. These brain regions are connected by white matter pathways that include the cingulum bundle, uncinate fasciculus, and fornix/stria terminalis. Individuals with trauma and stress-related disorders show dysfunction of the cognitive-affective processes supported by the brain regions these white matter tracts connect....
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#1Muriah D. Wheelock (UAB: University of Alabama at Birmingham)H-Index: 8
#2D. Rangaprakash (AU: Auburn University)H-Index: 10
Last. David C. Knight (UAB: University of Alabama at Birmingham)H-Index: 24
view all 9 authors...
4 CitationsSource
#1Jonathan Adams (UAB: University of Alabama at Birmingham)H-Index: 1
#2Sylvie Mrug (UAB: University of Alabama at Birmingham)H-Index: 28
Last. David C. Knight (UAB: University of Alabama at Birmingham)H-Index: 24
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Abstract Childhood physical and sexual abuse victims are at increased risk for developing depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in adulthood. Prior findings suggest abuse onset, duration, and severity moderate relationships between victimization and psychopathology. However, because these abuse characteristics are highly intercorrelated, their unique, individual effects on mental health outcomes remain unclear. To address this gap, the present study examined relationship...
1 CitationsSource
#1Nathaniel G. Harnett (UAB: University of Alabama at Birmingham)H-Index: 6
#2Edward W. Ference (UAB: University of Alabama at Birmingham)H-Index: 1
Last. David C. Knight (UAB: University of Alabama at Birmingham)H-Index: 24
view all 6 authors...
Abstract Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with dysfunction of the neural circuitry that supports fear learning and memory processes. However, much of what is known about neural dysfunction in PTSD is based on research in chronic PTSD populations. Less is known about neural function that supports fear learning acutely following trauma exposure. Determining the acute effects of trauma exposure on brain function would provide new insight into the neural processes that mediate the ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Adam M. Goodman (UAB: University of Alabama at Birmingham)H-Index: 5
#2Nathaniel G. Harnett (UAB: University of Alabama at Birmingham)H-Index: 6
Last. David C. Knight (UAB: University of Alabama at Birmingham)H-Index: 24
view all 9 authors...
Abstract Excessive stress exposure often leads to emotional dysfunction, characterized by disruptions in healthy emotional learning, expression, and regulation processes. A prefrontal cortex (PFC)-amygdala circuit appears to underlie these important emotional processes. However, limited human neuroimaging research has investigated whether these brain regions underlie the altered emotional function that develops with stress. Therefore, the present study used functional magnetic resonance imaging ...
2 CitationsSource
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