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Jane K. Hill
University of York
124Publications
54H-index
13.5kCitations
Publications 124
Newest
Published on Feb 22, 2019in Arthropod-plant Interactions
Anna Christian Riach (University of York), M. V. L. Perera1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Exeter)
+ 3 AuthorsJane K. Hill54
Estimated H-index: 54
(University of York)
Oligophagous insects can consume a wide range of different host plant species, but how these host plants vary in their metabolite compositions and the extent to which this variation affects the biochemistry of the insect herbivores is largely unknown. An understanding of how defensive metabolites from plants are processed by insects may help us develop more effective pesticides. We studied the interactions between the oligophagous insect herbivore Pieris rapae (Lepidoptera: Pieridae) and five sp...
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Published on Dec 10, 2018in Remote Sensing in Ecology and Conservation
Merry Crowson (Zoological Society of London), Eleanor May Warren-Thomas (University of York)+ 13 AuthorsJennifer M. Lucey5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of York)
The loss of huge areas of peat swamp forest in Southeast Asia and the resulting negative environmental effects, both local and global, have led to an increasing interest in peat restoration in the region. Satellite remote sensing offers the potential to provide up‐to‐date information on peat swamp forest loss across large areas, and support spatial explicit conservation and restoration planning. Fusion of optical and radar remote sensing data may be particularly valuable in this context, as most...
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Published on Nov 1, 2018in Biotropica 2.28
Gail Stride (University of York), Chris D. Thomas84
Estimated H-index: 84
(University of York)
+ 4 AuthorsJane K. Hill54
Estimated H-index: 54
(University of York)
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Published on Sep 18, 2018in Biological Journal of The Linnean Society 2.53
Suzanna C. Mason1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of York),
Georgina Palmer5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of York)
+ 4 AuthorsTom H. Oliver26
Estimated H-index: 26
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Published on Mar 1, 2018in Global Change Biology 9.00
Rebecca A. Senior7
Estimated H-index: 7
(University of Sheffield),
Jane K. Hill54
Estimated H-index: 54
(University of York)
+ 1 AuthorsA. David Edwards DSc FMedSci94
Estimated H-index: 94
(University of Sheffield)
Tropical rainforests are subject to extensive degradation by commercial selective logging. Despite pervasive changes to forest structure, selectively logged forests represent vital refugia for global biodiversity. The ability of these forests to buffer temperature-sensitive species from climate warming will be an important determinant of their future conservation value, although this topic remains largely unexplored. Thermal buffering potential is broadly determined by: (i) the difference betwee...
8 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 2018in Insect Conservation and Diversity 2.09
Suzanna C. Mason1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of York),
Jane K. Hill54
Estimated H-index: 54
(University of York)
+ 4 AuthorsTom H. Oliver26
Estimated H-index: 26
(University of Reading)
1. Abundance data are the foundation for many ecological and conservation projects, but are only available for a few taxonomic groups. In contrast, distribution records (georeferenced presence records) are more widely available. Here we examine whether year-to-year changes in numbers of distribution records, collated over a large spatial scale, can provide a measure of species' population variability, and hence act as a metric of abundance changes. 2. We used 33 British butterfly species to test...
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Published on Nov 1, 2017in Oikos 3.71
Andrew J. Suggitt9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Exeter),
Philip J. Platts17
Estimated H-index: 17
(University of York)
+ 21 AuthorsAnna B. Harper12
Estimated H-index: 12
(University of Exeter)
Although the number of studies discerning the impact of climate change on ecological systems continues to increase, there has been relatively little sharing of the lessons learnt when accumulating this evidence. At a recent workshop entitled ‘Using climate data in ecological research’ held at the UK Met Office, ecologists and climate scientists came together to discuss the robust analysis of climate data in ecology. The discussions identified three common pitfalls encountered by ecologists: 1) s...
7 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 2017in Ecology and Evolution 2.34
Rebecca A. Senior7
Estimated H-index: 7
(University of Sheffield),
Jane K. Hill54
Estimated H-index: 54
(University of York)
+ 2 AuthorsA. David Edwards DSc FMedSci94
Estimated H-index: 94
(University of Sheffield)
Temperature is a core component of a species' fundamental niche. At the fine scale over which most organisms experience climate (mm to ha), temperature depends upon the amount of radiation reaching the Earth's surface, which is principally governed by vegetation. Tropical regions have undergone widespread and extreme changes to vegetation, particularly through the degradation and conversion of rainforests. As most terrestrial biodiversity is in the tropics, and many of these species possess narr...
10 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2017in Agricultural Systems 3.00
Kuntal Singh1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of York),
Colin J. McClean22
Estimated H-index: 22
(University of York)
+ 2 AuthorsJane K. Hill54
Estimated H-index: 54
(University of York)
Global warming is predicted to increase in the future, with detrimental consequences for rainfed crops that are dependent on natural rainfall (i.e. non-irrigated). Given that many crops grown under rainfed conditions support the livelihoods of low-income farmers, it is important to highlight the vulnerability of rainfed areas to climate change in order to anticipate potential risks to food security. In this paper, we focus on India, where ~50% of rice is grown under rainfed conditions, and we em...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 19, 2017in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B 5.67
Georgina Palmer5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of York),
Philip J. Platts17
Estimated H-index: 17
(University of York)
+ 7 AuthorsChris D. Thomas84
Estimated H-index: 84
(University of York)
Extreme climatic events could be major drivers of biodiversity change, but it is unclear whether extreme biological changes are (i) individualistic (species- or group-specific), (ii) commonly associated with unusual climatic events and/or (iii) important determinants of long-term population trends. Using population time series for 238 widespread species (207 Lepidoptera and 31 birds) in England since 1968, we found that population ‘crashes’ (outliers in terms of species' year-to-year population ...
20 Citations Source Cite
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