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Jane K. Hill
University of York
131Publications
54H-index
13.5kCitations
Publications 131
Newest
#1Chung-Huey Wu (NTU: National Taiwan University)
#2Jeremy D. Holloway (Natural History Museum)H-Index: 15
Last.Chuan-Kai Ho (NTU: National Taiwan University)
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Both community composition changes due to species redistribution and within-species size shifts may alter body-size structures under climate warming. Here we assess the relative contribution of these processes in community-level body-size changes in tropical moth assemblages that moved uphill during a period of warming. Based on resurvey data for seven assemblages of geometrid moths (>8000 individuals) on Mt. Kinabalu, Borneo, in 1965 and 2007, we show significant wing-length reduction (mean shr...
#2Chris D. ThomasH-Index: 84
Last.Karl GotthardH-Index: 26
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Advances in phenology (the annual timing of species’ life-cycles) in response to climate change are generally viewed as bioindicators of climate change, but have not been considered as predictors of range expansions. Here, we show that phenology advances combine with the number of reproductive cycles per year (voltinism) to shape abundance and distribution trends in 130 species of British Lepidoptera, in response to ~0.5 °C spring-temperature warming between 1995 and 2014. Early adult emergence ...
#1Philip J. Platts (Ebor: University of York)H-Index: 17
#2Suzanna C. Mason (Ebor: University of York)H-Index: 1
Last.Chris D. Thomas (Ebor: University of York)H-Index: 84
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Range shifting is vital for species persistence, but there is little consensus on why individual species vary so greatly in the rates at which their ranges have shifted in response to recent climate warming. Here, using 40 years of distribution data for 291 species from 13 invertebrate taxa in Britain, we show that interactions between habitat availability and exposure to climate change at the range margins explain up to half of the variation in rates of range shift. Habitat generalists expanded...
#1Gail Stride (Ebor: University of York)
#2Chris D. Thomas (Ebor: University of York)H-Index: 84
Last.Jane K. Hill (Ebor: University of York)H-Index: 54
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#1Sarah A. Scriven (Ebor: University of York)H-Index: 4
#2Sara H. Williams (UM: University of Montana)H-Index: 1
Last.Jane K. Hill (Ebor: University of York)H-Index: 54
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#1Nathalie Pettorelli (ZSL: Zoological Society of London)H-Index: 31
#2Jennifer Smith (ZSL: Zoological Society of London)
Last.Ken Norris (ZSL: Zoological Society of London)H-Index: 38
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#1Rebecca A. Senior (Princeton University)H-Index: 7
#2Jane K. Hill (Ebor: University of York)H-Index: 54
Last.A. David Edwards DSc FMedSci (University of Sheffield)H-Index: 94
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#1Rebecca A. Senior (University of Sheffield)H-Index: 7
#2Jane K. Hill (Ebor: University of York)H-Index: 54
Last.A. David Edwards DSc FMedSci (University of Sheffield)H-Index: 94
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#1Merry Crowson (ZSL: Zoological Society of London)
#2Eleanor May Warren-Thomas (Ebor: University of York)
Last.Jennifer M. Lucey (Ebor: University of York)H-Index: 5
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The loss of huge areas of peat swamp forest in Southeast Asia and the resulting negative environmental effects, both local and global, have led to an increasing interest in peat restoration in the region. Satellite remote sensing offers the potential to provide up‐to‐date information on peat swamp forest loss across large areas, and support spatial explicit conservation and restoration planning. Fusion of optical and radar remote sensing data may be particularly valuable in this context, as most...
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