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Russell Jago
University of Bristol
295Publications
49H-index
7,862Citations
Publications 295
Newest
#1Ruth Salway (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 2
#2Lydia G. Emm-Collison (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 2
Last.Russell Jago (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 49
view all 6 authors...
Physical activity is associated with improved physical and mental health among children, but many children do not meet the recommended hour per day of moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA). The aim of this paper is to investigate participation in active after-school clubs and active travel to and from school at age 11 and estimate the average daily minutes of MVPA associated with active club attendance and active travel. Accelerometer data were collected on three weekdays for 1...
#1Simon J. Sebire (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 20
#2Kathryn Banfield (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 6
Last.William Hollingworth (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 46
view all 12 authors...
Few adolescent girls engage in enough physical activity (PA) to meet recommendations and there is a need for new interventions to increase girls PA. We have previously published the results of the PLAN-A cluster randomised feasibility trial which was a peer-led school-based PA intervention, showing that the intervention was feasible and held promise to increase the PA of girls aged 12–13 years. In PLAN-A, pupils nominated by their peers as influential attend training to teach them how to influen...
#1Rebecca Langford (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 8
#2Russell Jago (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 49
Last.Ruth R Kipping (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 16
view all 11 authors...
The nutrition and physical activity self-assessment for childcare (NAP SACC) intervention has demonstrated effectiveness in the USA. A feasibility randomised controlled trial was conducted in England to adapt the intervention to the UK context. An embedded process evaluation focused on three key questions. 1. Was it feasible and acceptable to implement the intervention as planned? 2. How did the intervention affect staff and parent mediators? 3. Were the trial design and methods acceptable? Twel...
#1Kathryn Willis (UoB: University of Bristol)
#2Byron Tibbitts (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 2
Last.Russell Jago (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 49
view all 11 authors...
Adolescent girls are less physically active than recommended for health, and levels decline further as they approach adulthood. Peers can influence adolescent girls’ physical activity. Interventions capitalising on peer support could positively impact physical activity behaviour in this group. Building on promising feasibility work, the purpose of this cluster randomised controlled trial is to assess whether the Peer-Led physical Activity iNtervention for Adolescent girls (PLAN-A) increases adol...
#1Patricia Jessiman (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 2
#2Rona Campbell (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 35
Last.Dorothy Newbury-Birch (Teesside University)H-Index: 23
view all 5 authors...
Schools are an important setting for health promotion. In England, around one third of publicly funded schools have become independent of local authorities since 2000 and are now academies, run by an academy trust. The aim of this research was to examine attitudes towards health promotion held by academy trust leaders and senior staff. The research questions were: 1. How do academy trusts in England perceive their role in health promotion amongst students? 2. How are decisions around health prom...
#1Laura Tinner (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 1
#2Ruth R Kipping (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 16
Last.William Hollingworth (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 46
view all 6 authors...
Background Many children do not meet the recommended level of daily physical activity, even with the widely acknowledged health benefits associated with being physically active. There is a need to establish factors related to physical activity in children so that public health interventions may be appropriately designed. We investigated the association between Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL), family expenditure on physical activity and objectively measured daily physical activity in...
#1Byron Tibbitts (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 2
#2Alice Porter (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 1
Last.Russell Jago (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 49
view all 8 authors...
Numerous interventions to increase children’s physical activity levels are published, yet, few studies report indicators of external validity. Process evaluations are critical for assessing intervention implementation, sustainability and effectiveness. A mixed-methods process evaluation, using the RE-AIM framework, was conducted to evaluate the internal and external validity of Action 3:30R, a revised teaching assistant-led after-school intervention which aimed to increase physical activity in c...
The aim of this study was to examine how family structure is associated with moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA) for children aged between 6 and 11. At 6, 9 and 11 years, children wore an accelerometer and parents/carers completed questionnaires on demographics and family structure. Linear regression models examined cross-sectional associations between family structure and MVPA at age 9 and 11. Linear multilevel models examined longitudinal associations between age 6 and 11, ...
#1Simon J. Sebire (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 20
#2Kathryn Banfield (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 6
Last.Russell Jago (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 49
view all 12 authors...
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