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Jingmai K. O’Connor
Chinese Academy of Sciences
25Publications
9H-index
306Citations
Publications 25
Newest
Published on Jan 30, 2019in Scientific Reports 4.12
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(China University of Geosciences),
Ryan C. McKellar12
Estimated H-index: 12
(KU: University of Kansas)
+ 3 AuthorsLuis M. Chiappe45
Estimated H-index: 45
(Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County)
Over the last three years, Burmese amber (~99 Ma, from Myanmar) has provided a series of immature enantiornithine skeletal remains preserved in varying developmental stages and degrees of completeness. These specimens have improved our knowledge based on compression fossils in Cretaceous sedimentary rocks, adding details of three-dimensional structure and soft tissues that are rarely preserved elsewhere. Here we describe a remarkably well-preserved foot, accompanied by part of the wing plumage. ...
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Published on May 1, 2019in Nature 41.58
Min Wang30
Estimated H-index: 30
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Jingmai K. O’Connor9
Estimated H-index: 9
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 1 AuthorsZHOUZhonghe47
Estimated H-index: 47
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Powered flight evolved independently in vertebrates in the pterosaurs, birds and bats, each of which has a different configuration of the bony elements and epidermal structures that form the wings1,2. Whereas the early fossil records of pterosaurs and bats are sparse, mounting evidence (primarily from China) of feathered non-avian dinosaurs and stemward avians that derive primarily from the Middle–Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous periods has enabled the slow piecing together of the origins of...
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Yanhong Pan13
Estimated H-index: 13
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Wenxia Zheng10
Estimated H-index: 10
(NCSU: North Carolina State University)
+ 13 AuthorsTao Zhao1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Dinosaur fossils possessing integumentary appendages of various morphologies, interpreted as feathers, have greatly enhanced our understanding of the evolutionary link between birds and dinosaurs, as well as the origins of feathers and avian flight. In extant birds, the unique expression and amino acid composition of proteins in mature feathers have been shown to determine their biomechanical properties, such as hardness, resilience, and plasticity. Here, we provide molecular and ultrastructural...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2018in Scientific Reports 4.12
Dana Rashid2
Estimated H-index: 2
(MSU: Montana State University),
Kevin Surya (MSU: Montana State University)+ 7 AuthorsJohn R. Horner41
Estimated H-index: 41
(MSU: Montana State University)
The avian tail played a critical role in the evolutionary transition from long- to short-tailed birds, yet its ontogeny in extant birds has largely been ignored. This deficit has hampered efforts to effectively identify intermediate species during the Mesozoic transition to short tails. Here we show that fusion of distal vertebrae into the pygostyle structure does not occur in extant birds until near skeletal maturity, and mineralization of vertebral processes also occurs long after hatching. Ev...
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Published on Dec 1, 2018in Nature Communications 12.35
Jingmai K. O’Connor9
Estimated H-index: 9
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Gregory M. Erickson33
Estimated H-index: 33
(FSU: Florida State University)
+ 3 AuthorsZHOUZhonghe47
Estimated H-index: 47
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Medullary bone is an ephemeral type of bone tissue, today found only in sexually mature female birds, that provides a calcium reservoir for eggshell formation. The presence of medullary bone-like tissues in extant birds, pterosaurs, and dinosaurs distantly related to birds shows that caution must be exercised before concluding that fossils bear medullary bone. Here we describe a new specimen of pengornithid enantiornithine from the Lower Cretaceous Jiufotang Formation. Consisting of an isolated ...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2018in Journal of Palaeogeography
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(China University of Geosciences),
Pierre F.D. Cockx1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Regina)
+ 1 AuthorsJingmai K. O’Connor9
Estimated H-index: 9
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Over the last 20 years, compression fossils of feathers surrounding dinosaurs have greatly expanded our understanding of the origin and evolution of feathers. One of the most peculiar feather morphotypes discovered to date are rachis dominated feathers (RDFs), which have also been referred to as proximally ribbon-like pennaceous feathers (PRPFs). These elongate feathers are only found in the tail plumage, typically occurring in pairs with both streamer (not proximally ribbon-like) and racket-plu...
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Published on Dec 1, 2018in Scientific Reports 4.12
Yaser Saffar Talori (THU: Tsinghua University), Yun-Fei Liu (THU: Tsinghua University)+ 3 AuthorsZhiheng Li8
Estimated H-index: 8
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Pennaceous feathers capable of forming aerodynamic surfaces are characteristic of Pennaraptora, the group comprising birds and their closest relatives among non-avian dinosaurs. However, members of the basal pennaraptoran lineage Oviraptorosauria were clearly flightless, and the function of pennaceous feathers on the forelimb in oviraptorosaurs is still uncertain. In the basal oviraptorosaur Caudipteryx both the skeleton and the plumage, which includes pennaceous feathers forming wing-like arran...
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