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Michael I. Norton
Harvard University
PsychologyEconomicsMarketingHappinessSocial psychology
307Publications
47H-index
10.1kCitations
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Publications 304
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#1Ximena Garcia-Rada (Harvard University)H-Index: 4
#2Michael I. Norton (Harvard University)H-Index: 47
The current political discourse in the United States focuses on extreme political polarization as a contributor to ills ranging from government shutdowns to awkward family holidays. And indeed, a large body of research has documented differences between liberals and conservatives–primarily focused on Republicans and Democrats in the United States. We combine large international surveys and more fine-grained surveys of United States citizens to compare differences in opinion between Republicans a...
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#1Lara B. Aknin (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 17
#2Elizabeth W. Dunn (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 35
Last. Michael I. Norton (Harvard University)H-Index: 47
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Research indicates that spending money on others-prosocial spending-leads to greater happiness than spending money on oneself (e.g., Dunn, Aknin, & Norton, 2008, 2014). These findings have received widespread attention because they offer insight into why people engage in costly prosocial behavior, and what constitutes happier spending more broadly. However, most studies on prosocial spending (like most research on the emotional benefits of generosity) utilized small sample sizes (n < 100/cell). ...
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#1Paul Smeets (UM: Maastricht University)H-Index: 6
#2Ashley V. Whillans (Harvard University)H-Index: 8
Last. Michael I. Norton (Harvard University)H-Index: 47
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How do the very wealthy spend their time, and how does time use relate to well-being? In two studies in the Netherlands, the affluent (N = 863; N = 690) and the general population (N = 1,232; N = 3...
1 CitationsSource
AbstractWe document the impact of making a consumer the tipping point whose behavior causes some aggregate behavior to tip over a social threshold, increasing the impact of all others who have already engaged in a target behavior. In study 1, consumers were more likely to agree to get a blood screening when they were the tipping point who caused an incentive to exceed a threshold. Study 2 shows that being the tipping point can be more effective in changing behavior than equivalent-in-value incen...
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#1Elizabeth W. Dunn (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 35
#2Ashley V. Whillans (Harvard University)H-Index: 8
Last. Lara B. Aknin (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 17
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Abstract Researchers have long been interested in the relationship between income and happiness, but a newer wave of work suggests that how people use their money also matters. We discuss the three primary areas in which psychologists have explored the relationship between spending decisions and subjective well-being, beginning with a brief review of seminal research on the benefits of buying experiences. We then offer an in-depth review of two other domains in which changes in spending decision...
1 CitationsSource
#1Ximena Garcia-RadaH-Index: 4
#2Leslie K. JohnH-Index: 17
Last. Michael I. NortonH-Index: 47
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Things change. Things also get changed—often. Why? The obvious reason is that revising things often makes them better. We document a less obvious reason: revising things makes people think they are better, even absent objective improvement. Eleven studies document the preference for revision and provide insight into its psychological underpinnings. Studies 1A-1C document the effect among MBA students engaged in a resume revision process, while Studies 2 and 3 demonstrate the effect both experien...
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#1Ilyana KuziemkoH-Index: 17
#2Michael I. NortonH-Index: 47
Last. Stefanie StantchevaH-Index: 10
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#1Anne WilsonH-Index: 3
Last. Michael I. NortonH-Index: 47
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#1Tami Kim (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 4
#2Leslie K. John (Harvard University)H-Index: 17
Last. Michael I. Norton (Harvard University)H-Index: 47
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Firms are increasingly giving consumers the vote. Eight studies show that, when firms empower consumers to vote, consumers infer a series of implicit promises—even in the absence of explicit promis...
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#1Thomas Bradford Bitterly (UM: University of Michigan)
#2Cecily D. Cooper (UM: University of Miami)H-Index: 17
Last. Ovul Sezer (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 5
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