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Nichola Lowe
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
49Publications
11H-index
439Citations
Publications 49
Newest
#1Paige ClaytonH-Index: 2
#2Mary DoneganH-Index: 4
Last.Alyse Polly (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
view all 6 authors...
This article utilizes a unique database (PLACE, the PLatform for Advancing Community Economies) to explore relationships between founders’ prior work experiences and the outcomes of their entrepren...
#1Mary Donegan (UConn: University of Connecticut)H-Index: 4
Last.Nichola Lowe (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 11
view all 6 authors...
#1Mary DoneganH-Index: 4
#2T. William LesterH-Index: 12
Last.Nichola LoweH-Index: 11
view all 3 authors...
The use of incentive packages has intensified as local governments compete for new plants and corporate relocations, and as private firms increasingly demand a deal. While incentives promise jobs and tax revenue, scholars and practitioners criticize their high cost and limited accountability. Through a comparison of matched establishments, this paper explores how governmental incentive-granting strategy impacts incentive performance. We examine the overall impact of incentives and whether incent...
#1Nichola Lowe (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 11
#2Maryann P. Feldman (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 47
State and local economic development is often conceptualized as a series of successive waves, with each wave representing distinct policy priorities. In this study, we rework the standard wave metaphor to recognize the gains for regional economies when practitioners reach across established boundaries to work together to create a strategy mix. We present a case from North Carolina biosciences to demonstrate the contribution to regional industrial specialization when specialists combine their res...
#1Maryann P. Feldman (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 47
#2Nichola Lowe (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 11
#1Nichola Lowe (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 11
#2Laura Wolf-Powers (The Graduate Center, CUNY)H-Index: 1
ABSTRACTScholars have documented economic gains for regions that promote manufacturing through co-location of innovation and production activities. But it is unclear whether the production jobs created in this new context remain inclusive of workers with limited formal education. This paper compares US states that specialize in biopharmaceuticals to understand who participates in a so-called working region. While some state policy-makers have privileged scientific and design occupations at the e...
#1Natasha Iskander (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 8
#2Nichola Lowe (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 11
#1John R. Bryson (University of Birmingham)H-Index: 27
#2Rachel Mulhall (University of Birmingham)H-Index: 3
Last.Julianne Stern (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
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Manufacturing-related engineering skill shortages are being experienced in the USA and the UK. In this chapter we compare two models of employer-engagement in the education of 14- to 19-year-olds. The first model, University Technical Colleges (UTC), are supported by the UK government and engage national employers in developing localised solutions to skill demand in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM)-related occupations. The second approach, based in Chicago, USA, is the pro...
#1Paige Clayton (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 2
#2Maryann P. Feldman (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 47
Last.Nichola Lowe (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 11
view all 3 authors...
When they lack resources to commercialize science, entrepreneurs rely on intermediary organizations often within their local ecosystems. This paper seeks to improve our understanding of how intermediaries operate to advance the commercialization of science by providing a set of specialized services. We review five intermediaries commonly mentioned in the ecosystem literature: university technology transfer and licensing offices; physical space (incubators, accelerators, and co-working spaces); p...
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