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Kyle H. Elliott
University of Manitoba
58Publications
24H-index
1,734Citations
Publications 58
Newest
Mercury (Hg) is a neurotoxin that can be particularly harmful to top predators because it biomagnifies through the food web. Due to variation in the food web structure, variation in Hg exposure in predators may represent variation in diet rather than Hg availability. We measured Hg in eggs from six seabird species (N = 537) over 47 years. In contrast to expectation, storm-petrels feeding partially on invertebrates had the highest Hg burden while herons feeding on large fish had the lowest Hg bur...
Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) such as perfluoroalkyl carboxylates (PFCAs) and perfluoroalkyl sulfonates (PFSAs) have become virtually ubiquitous throughout the environment, and, based on laboratory studies, have known toxicological consequences. Various national and international voluntary phase-outs and restrictions on these compounds have been implemented over the last 10 to 15 years. In the present study, we examine trends (1990/1991–2010/2011) in aquatic birds (ancient murrelet, Synthlibo...
#1Akiko ShojiH-Index: 9
#2Kyle H. ElliottH-Index: 24
Last.Tim GuilfordH-Index: 36
view all 6 authors...
Many marine predators coexist at colonies, creating a zone where there could be sig- nificant inter- and intraspecific competition. To minimize the potential for direct competition, under the principle of competitive exclusion, sympatric predators may differ in their foraging be - haviour at the colony. At Skomer, Wales, razorbills Alca torda and puffins Fratercula arctica both breed at the same time of year, forage on sand eels Ammodytes sp. and their populations are sta- ble or declining, mean...
#1Kyle H. Elliott (UM: University of Manitoba)H-Index: 24
#2James F. Hare (UM: University of Manitoba)H-Index: 21
Last.W. Gary Anderson (UM: University of Manitoba)H-Index: 19
view all 6 authors...
Summary A higher proportion of long-lived animals die from senescence than short-lived animals, yet many long-lived homeotherms show few signs of physiological ageing in the wild. This may, however, differ in long-lived diving homeotherms that frequently encounter hypoxic conditions and have very high metabolic rates. To examine ageing within a long-lived diving homeotherm, we studied resting metabolism and thyroid hormones (N = 43), blood oxygen stores (N = 93) and foraging behaviour (N = 230) ...
#1Jorg Welcker (NPI: Norwegian Polar Institute)H-Index: 19
#2John R. Speakman (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 78
Last.Alexander S. Kitaysky (UAF: University of Alaska Fairbanks)H-Index: 33
view all 5 authors...
Summary 1. Reproduction is energetically expensive, and daily energy expenditure (DEE) often peaks during the period of rearing young. The ‘potentiation’ hypothesis predicts that high DEE needs to be sustained by a corresponding up-regulation of metabolic machinery; thus, a concomitant increase in the resting metabolic rate (RMR) is expected. Alternatively, the ‘compensation’ hypothesis predicts that DEE and RMR are regulated independently and animals may maintain low RMR to maximize the energy ...
#1Akiko Shoji (EC: Environment Canada)H-Index: 9
#2Kyle H. Elliott (UM: University of Manitoba)H-Index: 24
Last.Anthony J. Gaston (U of O: University of Ottawa)H-Index: 43
view all 5 authors...
Energy costs during breeding play an important role in the evolution of life history traits. Seabirds show substantial variation in both incubation shift length (ISL) and metabolic rates. However, it is still unclear how variation in life history traits relates to incubation metabolic rates (IMR). Here, we examine the relationship between IMR and life history traits, including ISL, fledging strategy (precocial to altricial), incubation period, nest location (surface vs. underground) and clutch m...
#1Kyle H. Elliott (UM: University of Manitoba)H-Index: 24
Last.James F. Hare (UM: University of Manitoba)H-Index: 21
view all 10 authors...
Background Windscapes affect energy costs for flying animals, but animals can adjust their behavior to accommodate wind-induced energy costs. Theory predicts that flying animals should decrease air speed to compensate for increased tailwind speed and increase air speed to compensate for increased crosswind speed. In addition, animals are expected to vary their foraging effort in time and space to maximize energy efficiency across variable windscapes.
#1Kyle H. Elliott (UM: University of Manitoba)H-Index: 24
#2Kathleen M. O'Reilly (UP: University of Portland)H-Index: 6
Last.W. Gary Anderson (UM: University of Manitoba)H-Index: 19
view all 6 authors...
Abstract The reproductive success of wild animals usually increases with age before declining at the end of life, but the proximate mechanisms underlying those patterns remain elusive. Young animals are expected to invest less in current reproduction due to high prospects for future reproduction (the “restraint” hypothesis). The oldest animals may also show restraint when conditions are sub-optimal where even a small increase in reproductive investment may lead to death (“terminal restraint”). A...
Ongoing climate change is altering Arctic marine ecosystems with major conse- quences for food-webs. Seabirds, by foraging over large marine areas but returning regularly to their breeding colonies, provide a good medium for tracking such changes. We studied the prey delivered to nestling thick-billed murres Uria lomvia at a colony in northern Hudson Bay, Canada, over the period 1981−2013. During that period, ice conditions in the region altered substantially, with earlier break-up and clearance...
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