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Sven G. Nilsson
Lund University
126Publications
39H-index
4,731Citations
Publications 126
Newest
Published on Nov 1, 2018in Journal of Animal Ecology 4.46
Anders Pape Møller120
Estimated H-index: 120
(Université Paris-Saclay),
Javier Balbontín19
Estimated H-index: 19
(University of Seville)
+ 30 AuthorsAnna Dubiec13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Museum and Institute of Zoology)
Co-existence between great tits Parus major and blue tits Cyanistes caeruleus, but also other hole nesting taxa, constitutes a classic example of species co-occurrence resulting in potential interference and exploitation competition for food and for breeding and roosting sites. However, the spatial and temporal variation in co-existence and its consequences for competition remain poorly understood. 2.We used an extensive database on reproduction in nest boxes by great and blue tits based on 87 s...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2017in Ecology and Evolution 2.34
Lawrence N. Hudson16
Estimated H-index: 16
(Natural History Museum),
Tim Newbold21
Estimated H-index: 21
(University College London)
+ 511 AuthorsDominic J. Bennett6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Imperial College London)
The PREDICTS project—Projecting Responses of Ecological Diversity In Changing Terrestrial Systems (www.predicts.org.uk)—has collated from published studies a large, reasonably representative database of comparable samples of biodiversity from multiple sites that differ in the nature or intensity of human impacts relating to land use. We have used this evidence base to develop global and regional statistical models of how local biodiversity responds to these measures. We describe and make freely ...
30 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 1, 2016in Ecology and Evolution 2.34
Marie Vaugoyeau1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Université Paris-Saclay),
Frank Adriaensen28
Estimated H-index: 28
(University of Antwerp)
+ 74 AuthorsJordi Camprodon6
Estimated H-index: 6
The increase in size of human populations in urban and agricultural areas has resulted in considerable habitat conversion globally. Such anthropogenic areas have specific environmental characteristics, which influence the physiology, life history, and population dynamics of plants and animals. For example, the date of bud burst is advanced in urban compared to nearby natural areas. In some birds, breeding success is determined by synchrony between timing of breeding and peak food abundance. Pert...
15 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 1, 2016in Scientific Reports 4.12
Adriana De Palma9
Estimated H-index: 9
,
Stefan Abrahamczyk17
Estimated H-index: 17
+ 72 AuthorsStuart Connop10
Estimated H-index: 10
Land-use change and intensification threaten bee populations worldwide, imperilling pollination services. Global models are needed to better characterise, project, and mitigate bees' responses to these human impacts. The available data are, however, geographically and taxonomically unrepresentative; most data are from North America and Western Europe, overrepresenting bumblebees and raising concerns that model results may not be generalizable to other regions and taxa. To assess whether the geog...
24 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2016in Scientific Reports 4.12
De Adriana Palma , Stefan Abrahamczyk17
Estimated H-index: 17
+ 72 AuthorsStuart Connop10
Estimated H-index: 10
Land-use change and intensification threaten bee populations worldwide, imperilling pollination services. Global models are needed to better characterise, project, and mitigate bees' responses to these human impacts. The available data are, however, geographically and taxonomically unrepresentative; most data are from North America and Western Europe, overrepresenting bumblebees and raising concerns that model results may not be generalizable to other regions and taxa. To assess whether the geog...
Published on Jan 1, 2016
Lawrence N. Hudson16
Estimated H-index: 16
,
Tim Newbold21
Estimated H-index: 21
+ 511 AuthorsDominic J. Bennett6
Estimated H-index: 6
A dataset of 3,250,404 measurements, collated from 26,114 sampling locations in 94 countries and representing 47,044 species. The data were collated from 480 existing spatial comparisons of local-scale biodiversity exposed to different intensities and types of anthropogenic pressures, from terrestrial sites around the world. The database was assembled as part of the PREDICTS project - Projecting Responses of Ecological Diversity In Changing Terrestrial Systems; [www.predicts.org.uk](http://www.p...
4 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2014in Ecology and Evolution 2.34
Anders Pape Møller120
Estimated H-index: 120
(University of Paris-Sud),
Frank Adriaensen28
Estimated H-index: 28
(University of Antwerp)
+ 79 AuthorsJordi Camprodon6
Estimated H-index: 6
Nests are structures built to support and protect eggs and/or offspring from predators, parasites, and adverse weather conditions. Nests are mainly constructed prior to egg laying, meaning that parent birds must make decisions about nest site choice and nest building behavior before the start of egg-laying. Parent birds should be selected to choose nest sites and to build optimally sized nests, yet our current understanding of clutch size-nest size relationships is limited to small-scale studies...
27 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2014in Methods in Ecology and Evolution 6.36
Anders Pape Møller120
Estimated H-index: 120
(University of Paris-Sud),
Frank Adriaensen28
Estimated H-index: 28
(University of Antwerp)
+ 83 AuthorsJordi Camprodon6
Estimated H-index: 6
Secondary hole-nesting birds that do not construct nest holes themselves and hence regularly breed in nest boxes constitute important model systems for field studies in many biological disciplines with hundreds of scientists and amateurs involved. Those research groups are spread over wide geographic areas that experience considerable variation in environmental conditions, and researchers provide nest boxes of varying designs that may inadvertently introduce spatial and temporal variation in rep...
20 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 18, 2013in Nature and Conservation 1.37
Sven G. Nilsson39
Estimated H-index: 39
,
Markus Franzén19
Estimated H-index: 19
,
Lars B. Pettersson21
Estimated H-index: 21
Currently, we are experiencing biodiversity loss on different spatial scales. One of the best studied taxonomic groups in decline is the butterflies. Here, we review evidence for such declines using five systematic studies from southern Sweden that compare old butterfly surveys with the current situation. Additionally, we provide data on butterfly and burnet moth extinctions in the region’s counties. In some local areas, half of the butterfly fauna has been lost during the last 60-100 years. In ...
21 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 22, 2013in PLOS ONE 2.77
Markus Franzén19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ),
Sven G. Nilsson39
Estimated H-index: 39
(Lund University)
+ 1 AuthorsThomas Ranius34
Estimated H-index: 34
(Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences)
Population fluctuations and synchrony influence population persistence; species with larger fluctuations and more synchronised population fluctuations face higher extinction risks. Here, we analyse the effect of diet specialisation, mobility, length of the flight period, and distance to the northern edge of the species' distribution in relation to between-year population fluctuations and synchrony of butterfly species. All butterfly species associated with grasslands were surveyed over five succ...
7 Citations Source Cite
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