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Catherine Crockford
Max Planck Society
Developmental psychologyPsychologyAggressionSocial psychologyBiology
92Publications
27H-index
3,579Citations
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Publications 97
Newest
#1Cédric Girard-Buttoz (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 9
#2Martin Surbeck (Harvard University)H-Index: 14
Last. Catherine Crockford (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 27
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Several theories have been generated to understand the socio-cognitive mechanisms underlying the unique cooperative abilities of humans. The ‘interdependence hypothesis' posits first, that the cogn...
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#2Martin SurbeckH-Index: 14
Last. Catherine CrockfordH-Index: 27
view all 9 authors...
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#1Sylvain Lemoine (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 3
#2Christophe Boesch (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 84
Last. Roman M. Wittig (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 32
view all 6 authors...
Territorial social species, including humans, compete between groups over key resources. This between-group competition has evolutionary implications on adaptations like in-group cooperation even w...
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#1Aisha C. Bründl (MPG: Max Planck Society)
#2Patrick J. Tkaczynski (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 7
Last. Catherine Crockford (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 27
view all 6 authors...
: Postnatal development is protracted relative to lifespan in many primates, including modern humans (Homo sapiens), facilitating the acquisition of key motor, communication and social skills that can maximise fitness later in life. Nevertheless, it remains unclear what evolutionary drivers led to extended immature periods. While the developmental milestone literature is well established in humans, insight we can gain from one-species models is limited. By comparing the timing of relatable devel...
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#1Liran Samuni (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 10
#2Alexander Mielke (University of Portsmouth)H-Index: 8
Last. Roman M. Wittig (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 32
view all 5 authors...
In-group cohesion is an essential component of successful intergroup competition in both human and nonhuman animals, likely facilitating group members access to potential benefits. However, when benefits are equally shared among group members, group defense becomes a collective action problem, which might subvert cohesive participation during intergroup competition. There is a lack of consensus across studies and species with regard to the link between in-group cohesion and intergroup competitio...
4 CitationsSource
#1Alexander MielkeH-Index: 8
#2Catherine Crockford (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 27
Last. Roman M. Wittig (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 32
view all 3 authors...
Abstract: In many group-living animal species, interactions take place in changing social environments, increasing the information processing necessary to optimize social decision-making. Communities with different levels of spatial and temporal cohesion should differ in the predictability of association patterns. While the focus in this context has been on primate species with high fission-fusion dynamics, little is known about the variability of association patterns in species with large group...
1 CitationsSource
#1Cornelius Eichner (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 7
#2Michael Paquette (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 1
Last. Harald E. Moeller (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 36
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Post-mortem diffusion MRI (dMRI) enables high SNR (signal-to-noise ratio) images with high spatial resolution - at the expense of longer scanning times. The typically used segmented image acquisition leads to an incomplete signal decay before continuing the MR coding. Especially in diffusion-weighted MRI, with low signal intensities and lengthy contrast encoding, such inefficiency translates into reduced image quality and longer scanning times. This study introduces Multi Echo (ME) acquisitions ...
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#1Pawel Fedurek (University of Stirling)H-Index: 11
#2Patrick J. Tkaczynski (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 7
Last. Catherine Crockford (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 27
view all 10 authors...
Maternal cannibalism has been reported in several animal taxa, prompting speculations that the behavior may be part of an evolved strategy. In chimpanzees, however, maternal cannibalism has been conspicuously absent, despite high levels of infant mortality and reports of non-maternal cannibalism. The typical response of chimpanzee mothers is to abandon their deceased infant, sometimes after prolonged periods of carrying and grooming the corpse. Here, we report two anomalous observations of mater...
1 CitationsSource
#1Patrick J. Tkaczynski (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 7
#2Alexander Mielke (University of Oxford)
Last. Catherine Crockford (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 27
view all 6 authors...
Animals living in social groups navigate challenges when competing and cooperating with other group members. Changes in demographics, dominance hierarchies or ecological factors, such as food availability or disease prevalence, are expected to influence decision-making processes regarding social interactions. Therefore, it could be expected individuals show flexibility in social behaviour over time to maximise the fitness benefits of social living. To date, research across species has shown that...
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#1Sylvain Lemoine (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 3
#2Anna Preis (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 10
Last. Roman M. Wittig (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 32
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Summary Between-group competition in social animals appears to be a prominent selective pressure shaping the evolution of territoriality and cooperation [ 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 ]. Evidence for an effect of between-group competition on fitness in territorial species, however, is mostly lacking because of difficulty in measuring between-group competition and its long-term impact [ 5 ]. Between-group competition corresponds to a complex set of interactions between neighboring groups, and its intensity seem...
5 CitationsSource
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