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Johannes Lehmann
Cornell University
402Publications
81H-index
35.9kCitations
Publications 411
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Abstract Climate differences can induce profound changes in organo-mineral associations in soils. However, the magnitude of these modifications, whether as a direct effect of climate conditions or an indirect effect through changes in soil mineralogy, are still not fully understood. In this study, we aimed to improve understanding of how climate and resultant changes in soil mineralogy affect subsoil (i.e., 0.4–0.9 m) organo-mineral interactions at the macro- and microscale. A set of subsoil sam...
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#1Solomon Kamau (UoN: University of Nairobi)H-Index: 5
#2Edmundo Barrios (World Agroforestry Centre)H-Index: 25
Last.Johannes Lehmann (Cornell University)H-Index: 81
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Abstract Soil organic matter (SOM) is considered an important determinant of soil fertility in tropical agroecosystems. While numerous studies have shown the value of agroforestry in increasing soil nutrients and improving crop yield, few have addressed the systematic impacts of duration of cultivation on soil aggregation and C storage in such systems. A study was conducted in South Nandi (Kenya) to assess spatial influence of three dominant trees (Croton megalocarpus, Eucalyptus grandis and Zan...
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#1Dominic Woolf (Cornell University)H-Index: 6
#2Johannes Lehmann (TUM: Technische Universität München)H-Index: 81
Soil organic carbon (SOC) models currently in widespread use omit known microbial processes, and assume the existence of a SOC pool whose intrinsic properties confer persistence for centuries to millennia, despite evidence from priming and aggregate turnover that cast doubt on the existence of SOC with profound intrinsic stability. Here we show that by including microbial interactions in a SOC model, persistence can be explained as a feedback between substrate availability, mineral protection an...
1 CitationsSource
#1Johannes Lehmann (TUM: Technische Universität München)H-Index: 81
#2Bill Gaskins (Maryland Institute College of Art)
Examining scientific creativity through the lens of artistic practice may allow identification of a path towards an institutional environment that explicitly values and promotes transformative creativity in science. It is our perception as an artist and natural scientist that even though creativity is valued in the sciences, it is not institutionally promoted to the same extent it is in the arts. Acknowledging creativity as acts of transformation and central to scientific pursuit, actively utili...
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#1Rachel Hestrin (Cornell University)H-Index: 3
#2Edith C. Hammer (Lund University)H-Index: 14
Last.Johannes Lehmann (TUM: Technische Universität München)H-Index: 81
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Nitrogen availability often restricts primary productivity in terrestrial ecosystems. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are ubiquitous symbionts of terrestrial plants and can improve plant nitrogen acquisition, but have a limited ability to access organic nitrogen. Although other soil biota mineralize organic nitrogen into bioavailable forms, they may simultaneously compete for nitrogen, with unknown consequences for plant nutrition. Here, we show that synergies between the mycorrhizal fungus Rhizoph...
1 CitationsSource
#1Rachel Hestrin (Cornell University)H-Index: 3
#2Dorisel Torres-Rojas (Cornell University)H-Index: 2
Last.Johannes Lehmann (Cornell University)H-Index: 81
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Fire-derived organic matter, often referred to as pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM), is present in the Earth’s soil, sediment, atmosphere, and water. We investigated interactions of PyOM with ammonia (NH3) gas, which makes up much of the Earth’s reactive nitrogen (N) pool. Here we show that PyOM’s NH3 retention capacity under ambient conditions can exceed 180 mg N g−1 PyOM–carbon, resulting in a material with a higher N content than any unprocessed plant material and most animal manures. As PyOM i...
1 CitationsSource
Soil-based initiatives to mitigate climate change and restore soil fertility both rely on rebuilding soil organic carbon. Controversy about the role soils might play in climate change mitigation is, consequently, undermining actions to restore soils for improved agricultural and environmental outcomes.
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#1Chao Liang (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 18
#2Wulf Amelung (University of Bonn)H-Index: 61
Last.Matthias Kästner (Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ)H-Index: 40
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