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Robert Schleicher
Telekom Innovation Laboratories
Human–computer interactionSpeech recognitionComputer scienceMultimediaElectroencephalography
67Publications
15H-index
872Citations
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Publications 65
Newest
#1Sebastian Arndt (Telekom Innovation Laboratories)H-Index: 15
#2Jan-Niklas Antons (Telekom Innovation Laboratories)H-Index: 11
Last. Sebastian Möller (Telekom Innovation Laboratories)H-Index: 27
view all 4 authors...
Standardized methods to assess the quality of experience (QoE) of multimedia focus typically on short sequences of approximately 10s and a subjective judgment of the test participant. Two main problems occur when using this methodology: On the one hand these short sequences do not represent the typical media usage, and on the other hand it is still not completely understood how these subjective ratings are formed within the test participant. To overcome the second issue and to gain insight into ...
5 CitationsSource
#1Stefan Schaffer (Telekom Innovation Laboratories)H-Index: 3
#2Robert Schleicher (Telekom Innovation Laboratories)H-Index: 15
Last. Sebastian Möller (Telekom Innovation Laboratories)H-Index: 27
view all 3 authors...
In this paper, we review three experiments with a mobile application that integrates graphical input with a touch-screen and a speech interface and develop a model for input modality choice in multimodal interaction. The model aims to enable simulation of multimodal human-computer interaction for automatic usability evaluation. The experimental results indicate that modality efficiency and input performance are important moderators of modality choice. Accordingly, we establish a utility-driven m...
5 CitationsSource
#1Julia Seebode (Telekom Innovation Laboratories)H-Index: 1
#2Robert Schleicher (Telekom Innovation Laboratories)H-Index: 15
Last. Sebastian Möller (Telekom Innovation Laboratories)H-Index: 27
view all 3 authors...
Sound is a common means to give feedback on mobile devices. Much research has been conducted to examine the learnability and user performance with systems that provide audio feedback. In many cases a training period is necessary to understand the meaning of a specific feedback, because their functional connotation may be ambiguous. Additionally, no standardized evaluation method to measure the subjective quality of these messages has been established; especially regarding the affective quality o...
Source
Sep 23, 2014 in MobileHCI (Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services)
#1Katrin Wolf (University of Stuttgart)H-Index: 13
#2Robert Schleicher (Technical University of Berlin)H-Index: 15
Last. Michael RohsH-Index: 34
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The thumb and the fingers have different flexibility, and thus, gestures performed on the back of a held tablet are suggested to be different from ones performed on the touchscreen with the thumb of grasping hands. APIs for back-of-device gesture detection should consider that difference. In a user study, we recorded vectors for the four most common touch gestures. We found that drag, swipe, and press gestures are significantly differently when executed on the back versus on the front side of a ...
7 CitationsSource
#1Katrin Wolf (Technical University of Berlin)H-Index: 13
#2Robert Schleicher (Technical University of Berlin)H-Index: 15
Last. Michael RohsH-Index: 34
view all 3 authors...
Direct touch cannot reach the entire interaction areas of hand-held tablet. This paper explores which areas are accessible for direct touch on the front as well as on the back of tablets. The insights gained can serve as base for interactions designers to place GUI widgets, highlight areas that are hardly touchable, and thus, motivate further research on indirect pointing techniques for touch interactions.
3 CitationsSource
Using less bandwidth on the one hand and delivering high quality content on the other hand is one of the big goals for video service providers. Standardized rating tests are commonly used to quantify audiovisual quality. In order to better understand the neuronal processes underlying these quality ratings physiological measures may provide insights. This paper shows results of a series of studies using a physiological measurement, namely electroencephalography (EEG), combined with standard ratin...
27 CitationsSource
#1Jan-Niklas Antons (Telekom Innovation Laboratories)H-Index: 11
#2Sebastian Arndt (Telekom Innovation Laboratories)H-Index: 15
Last. Sebastian Möller (Telekom Innovation Laboratories)H-Index: 27
view all 4 authors...
This chapter outlines common brain activity correlates that are known from neuroscience, gives an overview on established electrophysiological analysis methods and on the background of electroencephalography (EEG). After that an overview on study designs will be given and a practical guideline for the design of experiments using EEG in the research area of Quality of Experience (QoE) will be presented. At the end of this chapter we will close with a summary, give practical advice, and we will ou...
14 CitationsSource
#1Robert Schleicher (Telekom Innovation Laboratories)H-Index: 15
#2Jan-Niklas Antons (Telekom Innovation Laboratories)H-Index: 11
This chapter gives an overview for Quality of Experience (QoE) practitioners on common setups in emotion research using audio (sounds), visual (pictures) and audiovisual (video clips) stimulus material to induce emotions. After presenting available databases for the different modalities, methods for subsequent as well as continuous self-assessment are discussed. Next to self-assessment, analysis of accompanying physiological changes is a common means to evaluate emotional responses. Here, typica...
3 CitationsSource
#1Robert Schleicher (Telekom Innovation Laboratories)H-Index: 15
#2Tilo Westermann (Telekom Innovation Laboratories)H-Index: 5
Last. Sebastian Möller (Telekom Innovation Laboratories)H-Index: 27
view all 5 authors...
1 CitationsSource
#1Robert Schleicher (Technical University of Berlin)H-Index: 15
#2Tilo Westermann (Technical University of Berlin)H-Index: 5
Last. Ralf Reichmuth (Technical University of Berlin)H-Index: 1
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This chapter gives an overview on basic concepts and current research in mobile human–computer interaction (HCI) by showing where it extends the notion of interaction with stationary devices. Important differences next to basic hardware properties (size etc.) are that the corresponding devices offer instant access to the internet and are used in a variety of situations or contexts, where location information so far appears to be the primary way to assess this context. As a consequence, a couple ...
3 CitationsSource
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