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James G. Murphy
University of Memphis
153Publications
37H-index
4,349Citations
Publications 159
Newest
#1Karen J. Derefinko (UTHSC: University of Tennessee Health Science Center)H-Index: 17
#2Francisco I. Salgado García (UTHSC: University of Tennessee Health Science Center)H-Index: 1
Last.Jeffrey H. Brooks (UTHSC: University of Tennessee Health Science Center)
view all 12 authors...
Abstract Research indicates that increased cumulative exposure (duration of administration and strength of dose) is associated with long-term opioid use. Because dentists represent some of the highest opioid prescribing medical professionals in the US, dental practices offer a critical site for intervention. The current study used a randomized clinical trial design to examine the efficacy of an opioid misuse prevention program (OMPP), presented as a brief intervention immediately prior to dental...
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#1Amy M. Cohn (University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center)H-Index: 15
#2Ollie Ganz (GW: George Washington University)H-Index: 5
Last.Amanda L. Graham (GUMC: Georgetown University Medical Center)H-Index: 28
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Abstract Aims The cooling and minty flavor of menthol in cigarettes has been hypothesized to mask the harshness of inhaled cigarette smoke, contributing to menthol's appeal and subjective reinforcement and linking menthol use to smoking initiation, progression, nicotine dependence, and difficulty quitting. This study examined differences between menthol and non-menthol smokers on behavioral economic indices of reinforcing efficacy (i.e., demand) and subjective response to smoking (i.e., satisfac...
1 CitationsSource
#1James G. Murphy (U of M: University of Memphis)H-Index: 37
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#1Samuel F. Acuff (U of M: University of Memphis)H-Index: 4
#2Michael Amlung (St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton)H-Index: 17
Last.James G. Murphy (U of M: University of Memphis)H-Index: 37
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1 CitationsSource
#1Tashia Petker (St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton)H-Index: 2
#2Jillian Halladay (St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton)H-Index: 2
Last.James MacKillop (St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton)H-Index: 46
view all 8 authors...
Heavy episodic drinking (HED) refers to alcohol consumption that exceeds the recommended threshold for a given episode and increases risk for diverse negative alcohol-related consequences. A pattern of weekly HED is most prevalent in emerging adults (i.e., age 18–25). However, rates of HED consistently decline in the mid to late twenties, referred to as ‘aging out’ or ‘maturing out’ of HED. Although many individual studies have followed changes in drinking behaviour over the transition to adulth...
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#1Keanan J. Joyner (FSU: Florida State University)H-Index: 3
#2Lidia Z. Meshesha (Brown University)H-Index: 6
Last.James G. Murphy (U of M: University of Memphis)H-Index: 37
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#1Rachel N. Cassidy (Brown University)H-Index: 9
#2Michael H. Bernstein (Brown University)H-Index: 5
Last.Suzanne M. Colby (Brown University)H-Index: 51
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Abstract Introduction The Alcohol Purchase Task (APT), a behavioral economic measure of alcohol's reinforcing value (demand), has been used to predict the effects of Brief Motivational Intervention (BMI) on alcohol use outcomes. However, it is not known whether BMI may be more or less efficacious, relative to control, among those with different levels of alcohol demand prior to treatment. Methods Non college-attending young adults ( N = 150) reporting past-month heavy drinking were randomized to...
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Author(s): Acuff, Samuel F; Soltis, Kathryn E; Dennhardt, Ashley A; Borsari, Brian; Martens, Matthew P; Witkiewitz, Katie; Murphy, James G | Abstract: Alcohol use is highly comorbid with depression, especially among college students, whose rates of both phenomena are higher than in the general population. The self-medication hypothesis (i.e., alcohol use is negatively reinforced via the alleviation of negative affect) has dominated explanatory models of comorbidity. However, self-regulation has ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Matt Field (University of Sheffield)H-Index: 43
#2Nick Heather (Northumbria University)H-Index: 46
Last.Katie Witkiewitz (UNM: University of New Mexico)H-Index: 38
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#1Karen J. Derefinko (UTHSC: University of Tennessee Health Science Center)H-Index: 17
#2Francisco I. Salgado García (UTHSC: University of Tennessee Health Science Center)H-Index: 1
Last.Daniel D. Sumrok (UTHSC: University of Tennessee Health Science Center)
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Abstract Adverse childhood experiences (ACE) are a public health concern and strong predictor of substance abuse, but no studies to date have explored the association between ACE and opioid relapse during medication-assisted treatment. Using an observational design, we examined this relationship using archived medical records of 87 patients who attended opioid use disorder treatment (buprenorphine-naloxone and group counseling) at a rural medical clinic. All variables were collected from medical...
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