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Michael J. Tierney
College of William & Mary
65Publications
16H-index
1,604Citations
Publications 66
Newest
#1Axel DreherH-Index: 55
#2Andreas Fuchs (Helmut Schmidt University)H-Index: 14
Last.Michael J. Tierney (W&M: College of William & Mary)H-Index: 16
view all 6 authors...
Abstract We investigate whether foreign aid from China is prone to political capture in aid-receiving countries. Specifically, we examine whether more Chinese aid is allocated to the birth regions of political leaders, controlling for indicators of need and various fixed effects. We collect data on 117 African leaders' birthplaces and geocode 1650 Chinese development projects across 2969 physical locations in Africa from 2000 to 2012. Our econometric results show that political leaders' birth re...
1 CitationsSource
Source
#1Axel DreherH-Index: 55
#2Andreas FuchsH-Index: 14
Last.Michael J. TierneyH-Index: 16
view all 6 authors...
Chinese aid comes with few strings attached, allowing recipient country leaders to use it for domestic political purposes. The vulnerability of Chinese aid to political capture has prompted speculation that it may be economically ineffective, or even harmful. We test these claims by estimating the effect of Chinese aid on subnational economic development - as measured by per-capita nighttime light emissions - and whether this effect is different in politically favored jurisdictions than in other...
1 Citations
2 CitationsSource
#1Axel Dreher (Heidelberg University)H-Index: 55
#2Andreas Fuchs (Heidelberg University)H-Index: 14
Last.Michael J. Tierney (W&M: College of William & Mary)H-Index: 16
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Chinese “aid” is a lightning rod for criticism. Policymakers, journalists, and public intellectuals claim that Beijing is using its largesse to cement alliances with political leaders, secure access to natural resources, and create exclusive commercial opportunities for Chinese firms—all at the expense of citizens living in developing countries. We argue that much of the controversy about Chinese “aid” stems from a failure to distinguish between China’s Official Development Assistance (ODA) and ...
18 CitationsSource
#1Daniel MaliniakH-Index: 9
#2Susan PetersonH-Index: 9
Last.Michael J. TierneyH-Index: 16
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ABSTRACTUsing data from the Teaching, Research, and International Policy (TRIP) project, we address several questions posed by students of the international relations (IR) discipline, specifically, whether and to what extent: US scholars, institutions, and journals dominate the field; national communities of IR scholars are insular or inward-looking; and/or the discipline is theoretically, methodologically, and epistemologically diverse. We draw from two major data sources: a series of cross-nat...
10 CitationsSource
#1Axel DreherH-Index: 55
#2Andreas FuchsH-Index: 14
Last.Michael J. TierneyH-Index: 16
view all 5 authors...
25 CitationsSource
#1Daniel L. Nielson (BYU: Brigham Young University)H-Index: 16
#2Bradley C. Parks (W&M: College of William & Mary)H-Index: 15
Last.Michael J. Tierney (W&M: College of William & Mary)H-Index: 16
view all 3 authors...
7 CitationsSource
#1Austin M. Strange (W&M: College of William & Mary)H-Index: 5
#2Bradley C. Parks (W&M: College of William & Mary)H-Index: 15
Last.Axel Dreher (Heidelberg University)H-Index: 55
view all 5 authors...
China’s development finance is sizable but reliable information is scarce. To address critical information gaps, we introduce a new open source methodology for collecting project-level development finance information and create a database of Chinese official finance to Africa from 2000-2011. Our initial data collection efforts found that China’s official finance commitments amount to approximately US$ 73 billion over the 2000-2011 period. We provide details on 1,511 non-investment projects to 50...
34 CitationsSource
#1Bradley C. ParksH-Index: 15
#2Roland HodlerH-Index: 16
Last.Michael J. TierneyH-Index: 16
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