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Jennifer B. Webb
University of North Carolina at Charlotte
30Publications
12H-index
529Citations
Publications 31
Newest
#1Erin Vinoski Thomas (UNCC: University of North Carolina at Charlotte)H-Index: 2
#2Jan Warren-Findlow (UNCC: University of North Carolina at Charlotte)H-Index: 12
Last.Margaret M. Quinlan (UNCC: University of North Carolina at Charlotte)H-Index: 5
view all 6 authors...
People with disabilities comprise roughly 25% of the U.S. adult population yet remain underrepresented in mainstream public health and evaluation research. The lack of measures of common constructs...
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#1Courtney B. Rogers (UNCC: University of North Carolina at Charlotte)H-Index: 3
#2Jessica J. Taylor (UNCC: University of North Carolina at Charlotte)H-Index: 1
Last.Jennifer B. Webb (UNCC: University of North Carolina at Charlotte)H-Index: 12
view all 4 authors...
Abstract In line with sociocultural models of parental influence on body image, we examined the relationship between recall of restrictive/critical caregiver eating messages (RCEM) and current frequency of disclosing self-disparaging fat talk among family in 335 undergraduate women (Mage = 19.4; SD = 1.53; range = 18–27). Additionally, two forms of relational body image (i.e., perceived body acceptance by others, external body image shame) and anti-fat attitudes were tested as potential explanat...
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#1Erin Vinoski Thomas (UNCC: University of North Carolina at Charlotte)H-Index: 2
#2Jan Warren-Findlow (UNCC: University of North Carolina at Charlotte)H-Index: 12
Last.Charlie L. Reeve (UNCC: University of North Carolina at Charlotte)H-Index: 21
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Abstract A current hypothesis is that women who learn to focus on their body's functionality versus appearance may experience improved body image outcomes. This research is underdeveloped in considering the perspectives of women with visible physical disabilities (WPD), who have differences in body functionality and appearance that influence their body image. Our study aimed to understand how WPD conceptualize body image and body functionality and to clarify relationships between these construct...
1 CitationsSource
#1Jennifer B. Webb (UNCC: University of North Carolina at Charlotte)H-Index: 12
#2Erin Vinoski Thomas (UNCC: University of North Carolina at Charlotte)H-Index: 2
Last.Davina Y. Putz (UNCC: University of North Carolina at Charlotte)H-Index: 1
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ABSTRACTContemporary fat studies scholarship seeks to challenge and critique the normative weightist lens through which modern social media for example stereotypically represent the embodiment of h...
1 CitationsSource
#2Jennifer B. WebbH-Index: 12
view all 4 authors...
Source
#2Jan Warren-FindlowH-Index: 12
Last.Jennifer B. Webb (UNCC: University of North Carolina at Charlotte)H-Index: 12
view all 3 authors...
Yoga is increasingly being recommended as a health self-management strategy for people with a range of disabilities. Mainstream yoga media have been criticized for limited representation of racial/ethnic, gender, age, and body size diversity within their publications; however, it is not known how these media outlets include visual representations of or textual information relevant for people with disabilities (PWDs). The purpose of this research was to understand if and how mainstream yoga media...
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#1Courtney B. Rogers (UNCC: University of North Carolina at Charlotte)H-Index: 3
#2Jennifer B. Webb (UNCC: University of North Carolina at Charlotte)H-Index: 12
Last.Nadia Jafari (UNCC: University of North Carolina at Charlotte)H-Index: 3
view all 3 authors...
Abstract The emergence of body image flexibility into the positive body image nomenclature has innovatively expanded the conceptualization of how individuals may adaptively respond to body image threats. Given the notable growth of interest in researching this construct over nearly the past decade, the present analysis provides a systematic and critical review of evidence examining the roles of body image flexibility as correlate, mediator, moderator, and in intervention research. Results indica...
7 CitationsSource
#1Jennifer B. Webb (UNCC: University of North Carolina at Charlotte)H-Index: 12
#2Courtney B. Rogers (UNCC: University of North Carolina at Charlotte)H-Index: 3
Last.Meagan P. Padro (UNCC: University of North Carolina at Charlotte)H-Index: 2
view all 4 authors...
Abstract A growing evidence base confirms sociocultural theory's predictions regarding the influence of direct exposure to family factors (e.g., parental commentary) in promoting disordered eating behavior as mediated by negative body image. Nevertheless, this model has not been specifically applied to investigating indirect or vicarious exposure to family communications (e.g., negative body talk) in estimating mindful eating behavior via positive body image intervening variables. Therefore, to ...
5 CitationsSource
#1Jennifer B. Webb (UNCC: University of North Carolina at Charlotte)H-Index: 12
#2Erin R. Vinoski (UNCC: University of North Carolina at Charlotte)H-Index: 4
Last.Lena Etzel (Queen's University)H-Index: 1
view all 5 authors...
Abstract In step with the proliferation of Thinspiration and Fitspiration content disseminated in popular web-based media, the fat acceptance movement has garnered heightened visibility within mainstream culture via the burgeoning Fatosphere weblog community. The present study extended previous Fatosphere research by comparing the shared and distinct strategies used to represent and motivate a fat-accepting lifestyle among 400 images sourced from Fatspiration- and Health at Every Size ® -themed ...
11 CitationsSource
#1Jennifer B. Webb (UNCC: University of North Carolina at Charlotte)H-Index: 12
#2Erin R. Vinoski (UNCC: University of North Carolina at Charlotte)H-Index: 4
Last.Davina Y. Putz (UNCC: University of North Carolina at Charlotte)H-Index: 1
view all 5 authors...
Abstract The present analysis investigated temporal trends in physical appearance attributes and attire worn by female cover models of Yoga Journal magazine between the years 1975–2015. Covers featuring a single female model ( N = 168) were coded for: pose activity, amount of body visibility, perceived body size, body shape, breast size, skin exposure, and revealing or form-fitting attire. When collapsed across all decades, the majority of cover models was actively posed with high body visibilit...
8 CitationsSource
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