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Thomas Venet
Institut national de recherche et de sécurité
16Publications
6H-index
72Citations
Publications 16
Newest
#1Ludivine Wathier (Institut national de recherche et de sécurité)H-Index: 3
#2Thomas Venet (Institut national de recherche et de sécurité)H-Index: 6
Last.Benoît Pouyatos (Institut national de recherche et de sécurité)H-Index: 7
view all 8 authors...
Abstract Volatile organic solvents are frequently present in industrial atmospheres. Their lipophilic properties mean they quickly reach the brain following inhalation. Acute exposure to some solvents perturbs the middle ear reflex, which could jeopardize cochlear protection against loud noises. As the physiological mechanisms involved in this protective reflex are highly complex, in vivo rodent models are required to allow rapid and reliable identification of any adverse effects of solvents on ...
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#1Monique Chalansonnet (Institut national de recherche et de sécurité)H-Index: 6
#2Maria Carreres-Pons (University of Barcelona)H-Index: 2
Last.Pierre Campo (Institut national de recherche et de sécurité)H-Index: 2
view all 11 authors...
Abstract Chronic occupational exposure to carbon disulfide (CS2) has debilitating motor and sensory effects in humans, which can increase the risk of falls. Although no mention of vestibulotoxic effects is contained in the literature, epidemiological and experimental data suggest that CS2 could cause low-frequency hearing loss when associated with noise exposure. Low-frequency noise might also perturb the peripheral balance receptor through an as-yet unclear mechanism. Here, we studied how expos...
2 CitationsSource
#2Thomas Venet (Institut national de recherche et de sécurité)H-Index: 6
Introduction Coachbuilding and painting shop workers are co-exposed to noise and ototoxic substances thereby producing synergistic adverse effects on hearing, which might increase the risk of professional hearing loss. A previous investigation showed that most of employers and workers ignore those risks due to occupational activities, or negligences. Methods 60 volunteers were measured in 24 shops. We used dosimeters for evaluating the noise exposures, and passive badges for the amount of solven...
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#1Thomas Venet (Institut national de recherche et de sécurité)H-Index: 6
#2Maria Carreres-Pons (University of Barcelona)H-Index: 2
Last.Pierre Campo (Institut national de recherche et de sécurité)H-Index: 2
view all 10 authors...
Abstract Carbon disulfide (CS 2 ) is used in industry; it has been shown to have neurotoxic effects, causing central and distal axonopathies.However, it is not considered cochleotoxic as it does not affect hair cells in the organ of Corti, and the only auditory effects reported in the literature were confined to the low-frequency region. No reports on the effects of combined exposure to low-frequency noise and CS 2 have been published to date. This article focuses on the effects on rat hearing o...
2 CitationsSource
#1Maria Carreres Pons (University of Barcelona)H-Index: 1
#2Monique Chalansonnet (Institut national de recherche et de sécurité)H-Index: 6
Last.Pierre Campo (Institut national de recherche et de sécurité)H-Index: 2
view all 9 authors...
Abstract Occupational noise can damage workers’ hearing, and the phenomenon is even more dangerous when noise is associated with an ototoxic solvent. Aromatic solvents are known to provoke chemical-induced hearing loss, but little is known about the effects on hearing of carbon disulfide (CS2) when combined with noise. Co-exposure to CS2 and noise may have a harmful effect on hearing, but the mechanisms involved are not well understood. For instance, CS2 is not thought to have a cochleotoxic eff...
1 CitationsSource
#1Ludivine Wathier (Institut national de recherche et de sécurité)H-Index: 3
#2Thomas Venet (Institut national de recherche et de sécurité)H-Index: 6
Last.Axel Gansmüller (University of Lorraine)H-Index: 9
view all 11 authors...
Abstract Some volatile aromatic solvents have similar or opposite effects to anesthetics in the central nervous system. Like for anesthetics, the mechanisms of action involved are currently the subject of debate. This paper presents an in vivo study to determine whether direct binding or effects on membrane fluidity best explain how solvents counterbalance anesthesia’s depression of the middle-ear reflex (MER). Rats were anesthetized with a mixture of ketamine and xylazine while also exposed to ...
3 CitationsSource
#1Pierre CampoH-Index: 22
#2Thomas VenetH-Index: 6
Last.Frédéric CosnierH-Index: 8
view all 5 authors...
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#1Thomas Venet (Institut national de recherche et de sécurité)H-Index: 6
#2Pierre Campo (Institut national de recherche et de sécurité)H-Index: 22
Last.Frédéric Cosnier (Institut national de recherche et de sécurité)H-Index: 8
view all 6 authors...
Abstract The neuropharmacological and cochleotoxic effects of styrene can exacerbate the impact of noise on the peripheral auditory receptor. The mechanisms through which co-exposure to noise and styrene impairs hearing are complex as the slowly developing cochleotoxic process can be masked in the short-term by the rapid pharmacological effect on the central nervous system. The current investigation was therefore designed to delineate the auditory frequency range sensitive to noise, to styrene, ...
9 CitationsSource
#1Thomas Venet (Institut national de recherche et de sécurité)H-Index: 6
#2Pierre Campo (Institut national de recherche et de sécurité)H-Index: 22
view all 5 authors...
AbstractNoise is one of the most pervasive hazards in the workplace. Despite regulations and preventive measures, noise-induced hearing loss is common. The current reference test is pure-tone air-conduction audiometry (PTA), but this test cannot be used to detect early hearing loss. Objective: In this study, we assess one-day auditory fatigue using both PTA and efferent reflexes (ER) measured using DPOAEs associated with contralateral acoustic stimulation (CAS DPOAEs). Design: The noise exposure...
3 CitationsSource
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