Match!
John J. Siegfried
Vanderbilt University
286Publications
36H-index
5,227Citations
Publications 286
Newest
#1Allen R. Sanderson (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 10
#2John J. Siegfried (Vandy: Vanderbilt University)H-Index: 36
The first Sveriges Riksbank Prizes in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel were awarded in 1969, 50 years ago. In this essay, we provide the historical origins of this sixth “Nobel” field, b...
Source
#1John J. Siegfried (American Economic Association)H-Index: 36
AbstractUndergraduate degrees awarded in economics by U.S. colleges and universities were stagnant from 2010 (2009–10) through 2013, increased rapidly (almost 15%) over the two years from 2013 thro...
Source
#1John J. Siegfried (American Economic Association)H-Index: 36
Undergraduate degrees awarded in economics by U.S. colleges and universities were stagnant from 2009–10 through 2012–13, increased rapidly (almost 15 percent) over the two years from 2012–13 through 2014–15, but have again leveled off in 2015–16 and 2016–17.
Source
#1John K. Wilson (UniSA: University of South Australia)H-Index: 6
#2John J. Siegfried (Vandy: Vanderbilt University)H-Index: 36
Numerous sports stadiums in Australia have been renovated or built from scratch in the past two decades, funded in whole or part by public subsidies. This note focuses on one particular group that benefits from subsidies—those spectators who attend live sporting events. A portion of the benefits from subsidies provided by government are captured as increased consumer surplus by sporting fans. Thus, the income and wealth position of these fans are of interest to those deciding whether to subsid...
3 CitationsSource
#1Allen R. Sanderson (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 10
#2John J. Siegfried (University of Adelaide)H-Index: 36
This essay describes important technological changes with regard to broadcasting and the growth of new revenue streams that those changes have created over the last 30 years and their influence on how, when, where and even for whom college sports are played. We discuss college sports broadcasting history, including the advent of cable television and new media technologies, complementary industries such as sponsorships and apparel, and public goods and winner-take-all market considerations as the...
1 CitationsSource
#1Allen R. Sanderson (University of Adelaide)H-Index: 10
#2John J. Siegfried (University of Adelaide)H-Index: 36
In this essay we consider why American colleges and universities participate in big-time commercialized intercollegiate sports, and how sports came to play such a prominent role on American college and university campuses. We also review how the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) developed as a body to regulate player safety and transformed itself into an economic regulator, the means by which the NCAA attempts to maintain its control, increase revenues, and reduce costs for college...
5 CitationsSource
Using a panel of 159 institutions over 10 years, we investigate the role model effect of women faculty and quantitative requirements on the female proportion of undergraduate economics majors. We find no evidence that female faculty attract female students. Calculus, however, does matter. A one semester calculus requirement is associated with more female majors at institutions offering business degrees and liberal arts colleges. A second semester calculus requirement deters women from majoring i...
3 CitationsSource
#1John J. Siegfried (Vandy: Vanderbilt University)H-Index: 36
Source
#1John J. Siegfried (American Economic Association)H-Index: 36
Undergraduate degrees awarded in economics by U.S. colleges and universities were stagnant from 2009–10 through 2012–13, increased rapidly (almost 15 percent) over the two years from 2012–13 through 2014–15, but have again leveled off in 2015–16.
2 CitationsSource
#1John J. Siegfried (Vandy: Vanderbilt University)H-Index: 36
Undergraduate degrees awarded in economics by U.S. colleges and universities were stagnant from 2009–10 through 2012–13, but have increased rapidly (almost 14 percent) over the two years from 2012–13 through 2014–15.
1 CitationsSource
12345678910