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Annibale Cois
University of Cape Town
8Publications
4H-index
64Citations
Publications 8
Newest
#1Emily C. Garman (UCT: University of Cape Town)H-Index: 2
#2Annibale Cois (UCT: University of Cape Town)H-Index: 4
Last.Crick Lund (UCT: University of Cape Town)H-Index: 39
view all 4 authors...
Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the association between depressive symptoms and suicidal risk over time among perinatal women at risk for depression antenatally, and assess modifying effects of age, perinatal stage and depressive symptom trajectory.
Source
#1Emily C. Garman (UCT: University of Cape Town)H-Index: 2
#2Annibale Cois (UCT: University of Cape Town)H-Index: 4
Last.Crick Lund (UCT: University of Cape Town)H-Index: 39
view all 5 authors...
Purpose Latent modelling was used to identify trajectories of depressive symptoms among low-income perinatal women in South Africa. Predictors of trajectories and the association of trajectories with child outcomes were assessed.
2 CitationsSource
Source
#1Crick Lund (UCT: University of Cape Town)H-Index: 39
#2Annibale Cois (UCT: University of Cape Town)H-Index: 4
Abstract Background Two theories have been proposed to explain the observed association between depression and poverty, namely social causation and social drift. Little is known regarding the relative importance of social causation and social drift in low and middle-income countries, where poverty is more severe and where most of the world's depressed individuals live. Methods We analysed nationally representative longitudinal data from the National Income Dynamics Study in South Africa and simu...
6 CitationsSource
#1Annibale Cois (UCT: University of Cape Town)H-Index: 4
#2Candy DayH-Index: 1
Obesity prevalence is increasing globally and contributes substantially to the burgeoning burden of non-communicable diseases. South Africa is particularly affected by this increasing trend and cross-sectional evidence suggests socioeconomic and behavioural variables as possible drivers. However, no large scale longitudinal study has attempted the direct identification of risk factors for progression towards obesity. This study analysed data on 10,100 South African adults (18 years and over) ran...
24 CitationsSource
Seasonal variations in blood pressure have been consistently reported. However, uncertainty remains about the size of the seasonal effect in different regions, and about factors that explain the differences observed across and within populations. Using data from a national panel study, we investigated seasonal variations in blood pressure in the South African adult population, and whether these variations differed across socioeconomic strata. We estimated age-specific seasonal effects on blood p...
3 CitationsSource
#1Annibale Cois (UCT: University of Cape Town)H-Index: 4
#2Rodney Ehrlich (UCT: University of Cape Town)H-Index: 32
Background Epidemiological research has long observed a varying prevalence of hypertension across socioeconomic strata. However, patterns of association and underlying causal mechanisms are poorly understood in sub-Saharan Africa. Using education and income as indicators, we investigated the extent to which socioeconomic status is linked to blood pressure in the first wave of the National Income Dynamics Study — a South African longitudinal study of more than 15000 adults – and whether bio-behav...
23 CitationsSource
#1Annibale Cois (UCT: University of Cape Town)H-Index: 4
#2Rodney Ehrlich (UCT: University of Cape Town)H-Index: 32
Background Epidemiological and other evidence strongly supports the hypothesis that problem drinking is causally related to the incidence of active tuberculosis and the worsening of the disease course. The presence of a large number of potential confounders, however, complicates the assessment of the actual size of this causal effect, leaving room for a substantial amount of bias. This study aims to contribute to the understanding of the role of confounding in the observed association between pr...
6 CitationsSource
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