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Gilbert J. Price
University of Queensland
GeologyPaleontologyEcologyPleistoceneMegafauna
75Publications
17H-index
903Citations
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Publications 76
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#1Scott A. Hocknull (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 12
#2Richard Lewis (University of Adelaide)H-Index: 1
Last. Julien Louys (Griffith University)H-Index: 19
view all 12 authors...
Explanations for the Upper Pleistocene extinction of megafauna from Sahul (Australia and New Guinea) remain unresolved. Extinction hypotheses have advanced climate or human-driven scenarios, in spite of over three quarters of Sahul lacking reliable biogeographic or chronologic data. Here we present new megafauna from north-eastern Australia that suffered extinction sometime after 40,100 (±1700) years ago. Megafauna fossils preserved alongside leaves, seeds, pollen and insects, indicate a sclerop...
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#1Sofia Samper Carro (ANU: Australian National University)H-Index: 6
#2Felicity Maria Gilbert (ANU: Australian National University)
Last. MahirtaH-Index: 4
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Abstract The migration of anatomically modern humans (AMH) from Africa to every inhabitable continent included their dispersal through Island Southeast Asia (ISEA) to Australia. Significantly, this involved overwater dispersal through the Lesser Sunda Islands between Sunda (continental Southeast Asia) and Sahul (Australia and New Guinea). However, the timing and direction of this movement is still debated. Here, we report on human skeletal material recovered from excavations at two rockshelters,...
1 CitationsSource
#1Mathew Stewart (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 3
#2Julien Louys (Griffith University)H-Index: 19
Last. Michael D. Petraglia (Smithsonian Institution)H-Index: 40
view all 14 authors...
Abstract In recent years, the Arabian Peninsula has emerged as a key region for elucidating hominin and faunal evolution and dispersals between Africa and Eurasia. Central to this research is the middle Pleistocene site of Ti's al Ghadah (TAG) which has yielded a diverse and abundant fossil faunal assemblage and the earliest chronometrically dated evidence for hominins in this part of the world. Here, we present the first detailed taphonomic study of the large Unit 5 fossil assemblage from the s...
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#1Michael C. Westaway (Griffith University)H-Index: 10
#2Gilbert J. Price (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 17
Last. Mark Collard (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 33
view all 9 authors...
The diversity of Australia's mammalian fauna has decreased markedly since European colonisation. Species in the small-to-medium body size range have been particularly badly affected. Feral cats and foxes have played a central role in this decline and consequently strategies for reducing their numbers are being evaluated. One such strategy is the reintroduction to the mainland of the Tasmanian devil, Sarcophilus harrisii. Here, we provide a palaeontological perspective on this proposal. We begin ...
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#1Kenny J. Travouillon (Australian Museum)H-Index: 12
#2Bruno F. Simões (Natural History Museum)H-Index: 4
Last. Julien Louys (Griffith University)H-Index: 19
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The Pig-footed Bandicoot, Chaeropus ecaudatus , an extinct arid-adapted bandicoot, was named in 1838 based on a specimen without a tail from the Murray River in New South Wales. Two additional species were later named, C. castanotis and C. occidentalis , which have since been synonymised with C. ecaudatus . Taxonomic research on the genus is rather difficult because of the limited material available for study. Aside from the types of C. castanotis and C. occidentalis housed at the Natural Histor...
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#1Gilbert J. Price (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 17
#2Julien Louys (Griffith University)H-Index: 19
Last. Jonathan Cramb (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 4
view all 4 authors...
Fossils from caves in the Manning Karst Region, New South Wales, Australia have long been known, but until now have never been assessed for their palaeontological significance. Here, we report on late Quaternary faunal records from eight caves in the region. Extinct Pleistocene megafaunal taxa are recognised in two systems and include giant echidnas (Tachyglossidae gen. et sp. indet.), devils (Sarcophilus laniarius), koalas (Phascolarctos stirtoni), marsupial lions' (Thylacoleo carnifex), and ka...
1 CitationsSource
#1William A Nicholas (UOW: University of Wollongong)H-Index: 5
#2Terry J. Lachlan (UOW: University of Wollongong)H-Index: 5
Last. Gilbert J. Price (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 17
view all 4 authors...
The extent to which scleractinian coral inhabited southern Australia during the warm intervals of the Quaternary is poorly understood because identifiable corals from interglacial sedimentary records are scarce. Here we document the presence of a sub-tropical coral, Goniopora lobata, recovered together with warm water mollusc species from a raised cobble and boulder beach conglomerate at Kingscote, Kangaroo Island, dated by uranium-series and amino acid racemisation methods respectively to the l...
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#1Julien LouysH-Index: 19
#3Gilbert J. PriceH-Index: 17
Last. Kenny J. TravouillonH-Index: 12
view all 3 authors...
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#1Jonathan Cramb (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 4
#2Gilbert J. Price (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 17
Last. Scott A. Hocknull (Queensland Museum)H-Index: 12
view all 3 authors...
The genus Leggadina (colloquially known as 'short-tailed mice') is a common component of Quaternary faunas of northeastern Australia. They represent a member of the Australian old endemic murid radiation that arrived on the continent sometime during the late Cenozoic. Here we describe two new species of extinct Leggadina from Quaternary cave deposits as well as additional material of the extinct Leggadina macrodonta. Leggadina irvini sp. nov. recovered from Middle-Upper (late) Pleistocene cave d...
1 CitationsSource
#1Philippa Brewer (AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 3
#2Michael Archer (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 36
Last. Gilbert J. Price (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 17
view all 4 authors...
A new species of wombat, Rhizophascolonus ngangaba sp. nov., is described from Miocene deposits at Riversleigh along with additional specimens of Rhizo-phascolonus crowcrofti, and some maxillary and mandibular fragments attributable to Rhizophascolonus. A phylogenetic analysis indicates that Rhizophascolonus is the next most plesiomorphic wombat after Nimbavombatus boodjamullensis. Morphological characters common to Nimbavombatus and Rhizophascolonus suggest that adaptations to high rates of too...
1 CitationsSource
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