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Haw Chuan Lim
National Museum of Natural History
30Publications
16H-index
729Citations
Publications 30
Newest
#1Haw Chuan Lim (National Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 16
#2Dency F. Gawin (UNIMAS: Universiti Malaysia Sarawak)H-Index: 4
Last.Frederick H. Sheldon (LSU: Louisiana State University)H-Index: 37
view all 6 authors...
Aim: A current model of rain forest population diversification in Sundaland specifieseast–west vicariance into refugia during the early Pleistocene. In some taxa, thisdivision was followed by dispersal and apparent secondary contact on Borneo in thelate Pleistocene. To investigate genetic, morphological, spatial and temporal charac-teristics of the model, we compared genomic population and plumage variationamong four bird species with east–west mtDNA and plumage structure. Location: Borneo and w...
6 CitationsSource
#1Haw Chuan Lim (National Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 16
#2Michael J. Braun (National Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 36
Sample availability limits population genetics research on many species, especially taxa from regions with high diversity. However, many such species are well represented in museum collections assembled before the molecular era. Development of techniques to recover genetic data from these invaluable specimens will benefit biodiversity science. Using a mixture of freshly preserved and historical tissue samples, and a sequence capture probe set targeting >5000 loci, we produced high-confidence gen...
17 CitationsSource
#1Sydney Anne Cameron (UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)H-Index: 29
#2Haw Chuan Lim (UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)H-Index: 16
Last.Robbin W. Thorp (UC Davis: University of California, Davis)H-Index: 22
view all 5 authors...
Emergent fungal diseases are critical factors in global biodiversity declines. The fungal pathogen Nosema bombi was recently found to be widespread in declining species of North American bumble bees (Bombus), with circumstantial evidence suggesting an exotic introduction from Europe. This interpretation has been hampered by a lack of knowledge of global genetic variation, geographic origin, and changing prevalence patterns of N. bombi in declining North American populations. Thus, the temporal a...
34 CitationsSource
#1Frederick H. Sheldon (LSU: Louisiana State University)H-Index: 37
#2Haw Chuan Lim (National Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 16
Last.Robert G. Moyle (KU: University of Kansas)H-Index: 31
view all 3 authors...
During the last 15–20 years, phylogenetic, phylogeographic, paleontological, geological, and habitat modeling studies have improved our knowledge of Sundaic biogeography dramatically. In light of these advances, we review (or postulate) where Sundaic rainforest birds came from, the causes of their endemism, and the influence of Pleistocene climatic perturbations on their diversification. We suggest that four scenarios make up a coherent, plausible explanation of patterns of extant diversity. Fir...
37 CitationsSource
#1Haw Chuan Lim (National Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 16
#2Fasheng ZouH-Index: 15
Last.Frederick H. Sheldon (Houston Museum of Natural Science)H-Index: 37
view all 3 authors...
Ecological niche modeling has emerged as an useful tool in the investigation of the phylogeographic histories of spe- cies or communities in a region. The high biodiversity (oftentimes cryptic), and complex geography and geological history of Southeast Asia particularly call for multipronged approaches in phylogeographic investigations. Past studies have focused on taxa that are associated with lowland rainforests, which is the dominant natural vegetation type. Here, we combine published phylo- ...
2 CitationsSource
#1A. Townsend Peterson (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 81
#2Robert G. Moyle (KU: University of Kansas)H-Index: 31
Last.Fasheng ZouH-Index: 15
view all 12 authors...
2 CitationsSource
#1Haw Chuan Lim (UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)H-Index: 16
#2Chia Ching Chu (UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)H-Index: 3
Last.Sydney Anne Cameron (UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)H-Index: 29
view all 4 authors...
Gut bacterial communities of bumble bees are correlated with defense against pathogens. Further understanding this host-microbe association is vitally important as bumble bees are currently experiencing global population declines, potentially due in part to emergent diseases. In this study, we used pyrosequencing and community fingerprinting (ARISA) to characterize the gut microbial communities of nine bumble species from across the Bombus phylogeny. Overall, we delimited 74 bacterial taxa (oper...
13 CitationsSource
#1Vivien L. ChuaH-Index: 5
Last.Sabrina S. TaylorH-Index: 15
view all 5 authors...
Maratua is an oceanic island ca. 50 km off the east coast of Borneo and home to several endemic taxa of birds and mammals. To determine the phylogeographic relationships of three of Maratua’s most distinctive avian endemics—a shama Copsychus stricklandii barbouri, a bulbul Pycnonotus atriceps hodiernus, and a monarch Hypothymis azurea aeria—we compared their mitochondrial ND2 sequences with those of putatively closely related Southeast Asian populations. We found that Maratua’s shama and bulbul ...
5 Citations
#1Haw Chuan Lim (Houston Museum of Natural Science)H-Index: 16
#2Vivien L. Chua (Houston Museum of Natural Science)H-Index: 5
Last.Frederick H. Sheldon (Houston Museum of Natural Science)H-Index: 37
view all 7 authors...
ABSTRACT The Rufous-tailed Tailorbird (Orthotomus sericeus)—a Sunda endemic—is divided into 3 morphologically based subspecies: one in western Sundaland (Malay Peninsula, Sumatra, and associated islands), one from the Natuna Islands in the South China Sea, and one on Borneo, Palawan, and smaller islands of the Sunda continental shelf east of Borneo. Previous study, however, suggested that these subspecies do not conform to molecular genetic subdivisions of the species. We reexamined the morpholo...
8 CitationsSource
#1Dency F. Gawin (UNIMAS: Universiti Malaysia Sarawak)H-Index: 4
#2Mustafa Abdul Rahman (UNIMAS: Universiti Malaysia Sarawak)H-Index: 8
Last.Frederick H. Sheldon (LSU: Louisiana State University)H-Index: 37
view all 7 authors...
The Mountain Black-eye (Chlorocharis emiliae) is an endemic white-eye (Zosteropidae) of Borneo with a unique ‘‘sky island’’ distribution. We compared mitochondrial ND2, ND3, Cytb, and control region DNA sequences (2,194 nucleotides) to study the phylogeographic relationships of five populations of this species that span its range: Mounts Kinabalu, Trus Madi, Murud, Mulu, and Pueh. These comparisons showed that black-eyes are divided into two main clades that correspond generally to subspecific m...
8 CitationsSource
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