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Hermes Ribeiro Luz
University of São Paulo
TickIsosporaEimeriidaeBiologyZoology
70Publications
9H-index
294Citations
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Publications 76
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#1Hermes Ribeiro Luz (UFMA: Federal University of Maranhão)H-Index: 9
#2Alejandro Ramírez-Hernández (USP: University of São Paulo)H-Index: 5
Last. Marcelo B. Labruna (USP: University of São Paulo)H-Index: 57
view all 6 authors...
ABSTRACT Brazilian spotted fever (BSF), caused by the bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii, is transmitted to humans mainly by the tick Amblyomma sculptum in southeastern Brazil. In most BSF-endemic areas A. sculptum populations are sustained chiefly by capybaras (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris), which are also the host of another tick species, Amblyomma dubitatum, not implicated in R. rickettsii transmission. Herein, we evaluated the effects of relative humidity (RH), temperature, and water immersion on ...
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#1Thiago C. Dias (Smithsonian Institution)
#1Thiago da Costa Dias (UFSCar: Federal University of São Carlos)H-Index: 1
Last. Hector R. Benatti (USP: University of São Paulo)H-Index: 3
view all 19 authors...
Human activities are changing landscape structure and function globally, affecting wildlife space use, and ultimately increasing human-wildlife conflicts and zoonotic disease spread. Capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris) is a conflict species that has been implicated in the spread and amplification of the most lethal tick-borne disease in the world, the Brazilian spotted fever (BSF). Even though essential to understand the link between capybaras, ticks and the BSF, many knowledge gaps still exist...
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#1Francisco B. Costa (USP: University of São Paulo)H-Index: 12
#2Monize Gerardi (USP: University of São Paulo)H-Index: 4
Last. Marcelo B. Labruna (USP: University of São Paulo)H-Index: 57
view all 9 authors...
3 CitationsSource
#1Anne-Lie BlomströmH-Index: 15
#2Hermes Ribeiro LuzH-Index: 9
Last. Mikael BergH-Index: 30
view all 7 authors...
In this study, we describe the viral composition of adult Antricola delacruzi ticks collected in a hot bat cave in the state of Rondonia, Western Amazonia, Brazil. A. delacruzi ticks, are special, compared to many other ticks, in that they feed on both bats (larval blood feeding) and bat guano (nymphal and adult feeding) instead of feeding exclusively on vertebrate hosts (blood feeding). Considering this unique life-cycle it is potentially possible that these ticks can pick up/be infected by vir...
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#1Hermes Ribeiro Luz (USP: University of São Paulo)H-Index: 9
#1Hermes R. Luz (UFMA: Federal University of Maranhão)
Last. Marcelo B. Labruna (USP: University of São Paulo)H-Index: 57
view all 10 authors...
A total of 482 bats representing 32 species and two families were captured in the Amazon forests of the Amapa state in northern Brazil. Nineteen Artibeus planirostris bats (3.9 %) were infested with 160 ticks, all identified as Ornithodoros hasei. Three pools of larvae were screened for rickettsial DNA via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting three rickettsial genes: gltA, ompA and htrA. Only one of them yielded an amplicons of the expected size for all three molecular assays. Comparisons o...
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#2Thiago F. Martins (USP: University of São Paulo)H-Index: 32
Last. Marcelo B. Labruna (USP: University of São Paulo)H-Index: 57
view all 8 authors...
Rickettsia parkeri strain Atlantic rainforest has emerged in Brazil during the last 10 years, with three laboratory-confirmed human cases. While these cases were epidemiologically associated with the tick Amblyomma ovale, in none of them the tick specimens that bit the patients could be identified. We report a clinical case of spotted fever rickettsiosis that was acquired in an Atlantic forest area in Bahia state, northeast Brazil. The case was determined to be caused by R. parkeri strain Atlant...
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#1Daniel Paiva Barros de Abreu (UFRRJ: Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro)H-Index: 1
#2Maristela Peckle Peixoto (UFRRJ: Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro)H-Index: 1
Last. Douglas McIntosh (UFRRJ: Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro)H-Index: 8
view all 8 authors...
Abstract The bacterium Rickettsia bellii has been detected in 25 species of ticks in the American continents, but its pathogenic potential is considered as undetermined. A possible role for this species in the phenomenon of transovarial exclusion of pathogenic members of the spotted fever group (SFG) of Rickettsia has been suggested and co-infections with pathogenic species have been reported infrequently in both North and South America. Traditional methods for the molecular detection of rickett...
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#1Thiago F. Martins (USP: University of São Paulo)H-Index: 32
#2Hermes Ribeiro Luz (USP: University of São Paulo)H-Index: 9
Last. Marcelo B. Labruna (USP: University of São Paulo)H-Index: 57
view all 19 authors...
Abstract Recent studies have reported several larvae of an unidentified Amblyomma species on passerine birds in Atlantic rainforest fragments in southeastern Brazil. These larvae yielded a unique 16S rRNA haplotype designated as Amblyomma sp. haplotype Nazare, which showed nucleotide identity levels of 91% to Amblyomma parkeri Fonseca & Aragao, 1952 and 88% to Amblyomma longirostre (Koch, 1844). Herein, we describe Amblyomma sp. haplotype Nazare as a new species, Amblyomma romarioi n. sp. Martin...
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#1Hermes Ribeiro Luz (USP: University of São Paulo)H-Index: 9
#2Francisco B. Costa (USP: University of São Paulo)H-Index: 12
Last. Marcelo B. Labruna (USP: University of São Paulo)H-Index: 57
view all 29 authors...
Background Brazilian spotted fever (BSF), caused by the bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii, has been associated with the transmission by the tick Amblyomma sculptum, and one of its main hosts, the capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris). Methods During 2015–2019, we captured capybaras and ticks in seven highly anthropic areas of Sao Paulo state (three endemic and four nonendemic for BSF) and in two natural areas of the Pantanal biome, all with established populations of capybaras. Results The BSF-ende...
2 CitationsSource
#1Adlilton Pacheco (UFRRJ: Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro)H-Index: 1
#2Matheus Dias Cordeiro (UFRRJ: Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro)H-Index: 2
Last. Adivaldo Henrique da Fonseca (UFRRJ: Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro)H-Index: 14
view all 8 authors...
1 CitationsSource
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