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John M. Light
Oregon Research Institute
41Publications
14H-index
606Citations
Publications 42
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Source
#1Leonard A. Jason (DePaul University)H-Index: 49
#2Jessica Kassanits (DePaul University)H-Index: 1
Last.Nathan J. Doogan (OSU: Ohio State University)H-Index: 11
view all 8 authors...
Source
#1Leonard A. Jason (DePaul University)H-Index: 49
#2Edward B. Stevens (DePaul University)H-Index: 7
Last.Nathan J. Doogan (OSU: Ohio State University)H-Index: 11
view all 4 authors...
ABSTRACTKey characteristics of recovery homes include governance style (which can play a central role in structuring recovery mechanisms), social embeddedness (e.g., social relationships within the...
Source
#1Nathan J. Doogan (OSU: Ohio State University)H-Index: 11
#2John M. Light (Oregon Research Institute)H-Index: 14
Last.Leonard A. Jason (DePaul University)H-Index: 49
view all 4 authors...
Abstract Improved access to housing and recovery support is a low-cost, high-potential opportunity to help people recovering from alcohol and substance use sustain their recoveries. Oxford House (OH) recovery homes represent a recovery-favorable social environment for at least some people, but it is still unclear which resident characteristics and relational dynamics affect the social integration of residents. In the current study, OH residents in three geographic locations completed a social ne...
Source
#1Julie C. Rusby (Oregon Research Institute)H-Index: 13
#2Erika Westling (Oregon Research Institute)H-Index: 9
Last.John M. Light (Oregon Research Institute)H-Index: 14
view all 5 authors...
Abstract Objective To date, research investigating the association between adolescent marijuana use and anxiety is mixed, given differences in how anxiety is measured and the age ranges studied. The research is further limited as many relevant studies have small sample sizes. This investigation examines the association between marijuana use (use in the past 30 days) and anxious mood lability (rapid fluctuation in emotional states) during early adolescence (average age 14.4, spring of 8th grade) ...
Source
#1John M. Light (Oregon Research Institute)H-Index: 14
#2Kathryn L. Mills (UO: University of Oregon)H-Index: 18
Last.Erika Westling (Oregon Research Institute)H-Index: 9
view all 4 authors...
Objective:Heavy alcohol consumption has both immediate and longer-term risks for adolescents. Using a dynamic network modeling approach, this study investigated the role of adult supervision and af...
Source
#1Julie C. Rusby (Oregon Research Institute)H-Index: 13
#2Michael J. Mason (UT: University of Tennessee)H-Index: 20
Last.Brian R. Flay (OSU: Oregon State University)H-Index: 78
view all 8 authors...
Abstract Introduction Experiencing relational victimization (e.g., peer exclusion, untrue rumors) during adolescence can have negative social–emotional consequences, including increased antisocial behavior and substance use. The negative impact of relational victimization may be lessened by spending time with supportive, prosocial peers. Methods This study examined the concurrent and predictive associations between relational victimization and peer affiliates' prosocial behaviors in 244 predomin...
Source
#1Nancy P. Barnett (Brown University)H-Index: 40
#2Melissa A. Clark (UMMS: University of Massachusetts Medical School)H-Index: 42
Last.John M. Light (Oregon Research Institute)H-Index: 14
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Abstract Heavy drinking and its consequences among college students represent a serious public health problem, and peer social networks are a robust predictor of drinking-related risk behaviors. In a recent trial, we administered a Brief Motivational Intervention (BMI) to a small number of first-year college students to assess the indirect effects of the intervention on peers not receiving the intervention. Objectives: To present the research design, describe the methods used to successfully enr...
1 CitationsSource
#1Miles Q. Ott (Smith College)H-Index: 7
#2John M. Light (Oregon Research Institute)H-Index: 14
Last.Nancy P. Barnett (Brown University)H-Index: 40
view all 4 authors...
Abstract We present a method whereby social network ties are used to identify behavioral leaders who are situated in the network such that these individuals are: 1) able to influence other individuals who are in need of and most receptive to intervention, thereby optimizing the impact of the intervention; and 2) not embedded with ties to individuals that are likely to be behaviorally antagonistic to the intervention or that would compromise the optimal impact of intervention. In this study we de...
3 CitationsSource
#1Nikola Zaharakis (UT: University of Tennessee)H-Index: 10
#2Michael J. Mason (UT: University of Tennessee)H-Index: 20
Last.Thomas Way (Villanova University)H-Index: 13
view all 9 authors...
The school environment is extremely salient in young adolescents’ lives. Adolescents who have unfavorable attitudes toward school and teachers are at elevated risk for dropping out of school and engaging in behavioral health risks. Peer network health—a summation of the positive and negative behaviors in which one’s close friend group engages—may be one way by which attitudes toward school exert influence on youth substance use. Utilizing a sample of 248 primarily African-American young urban ad...
2 CitationsSource
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