Match!
Ryan Fredric Bloomquist
Georgia Institute of Technology
10Publications
5H-index
680Citations
Publications 10
Newest
Ryan Fredric Bloomquist5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Teresa E. Fowler2
Estimated H-index: 2
+ 5 AuthorsJ. Todd Streelman27
Estimated H-index: 27
In Lake Malawi cichlids, each tooth is replaced in one-for-one fashion every ∼20 to 50 d, and taste buds (TBs) are continuously renewed as in mammals. These structures are colocalized in the fish mouth and throat, from the point of initiation through adulthood. Here, we found that replacement teeth (RT) share a continuous band of epithelium with adjacent TBs and that both organs coexpress stem cell factors in subsets of label-retaining cells. We used RNA-seq to characterize transcriptomes of RT ...
Published on Dec 1, 2018in Nature Communications11.88
Zhengwen An4
Estimated H-index: 4
('KCL': King's College London),
Maja Sabalić2
Estimated H-index: 2
('KCL': King's College London)
+ 3 AuthorsPaul T. Sharpe62
Estimated H-index: 62
('KCL': King's College London)
The extent to which heterogeneity within mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) populations is related to function is not understood. Using the archetypal MSC in vitro surface marker, CD90/Thy1, here we show that 30% of the MSCs in the continuously growing mouse incisor express CD90/Thy1 and these cells give rise to 30% of the differentiated cell progeny during postnatal development. In adulthood, when growth rate homeostasis is established, the CD90/Thy1+ MSCs decrease dramatically in number. When adult i...
Published on Dec 1, 2017in BMC Developmental Biology2.37
Ryan Fredric Bloomquist5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Georgia Regents University),
Teresa E. Fowler2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Georgia Institute of Technology)
+ 2 AuthorsJ. T. Streelman1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Georgia Institute of Technology)
Abstract Background Lake Malawi cichlids represent one of a growing number of vertebrate models used to uncover the genetic and developmental basis of trait diversity. Rapid evolutionary radiation has resulted in species that share similar genomes but differ markedly in phenotypes including brains and behavior, nuptial coloration and the craniofacial skeleton. Research has begun to identify the genes, as well as the molecular and developmental pathways that underlie trait divergence. Results We ...
Ryan Fredric Bloomquist5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Georgia Regents University),
Nicholas F. Parnell5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Georgia Institute of Technology)
+ 4 AuthorsJ. Todd Streelman27
Estimated H-index: 27
(Georgia Institute of Technology)
Teeth and taste buds are iteratively patterned structures that line the oro-pharynx of vertebrates. Biologists do not fully understand how teeth and taste buds develop from undifferentiated epithelium or how variation in organ density is regulated. These organs are typically studied independently because of their separate anatomical location in mammals: teeth on the jaw margin and taste buds on the tongue. However, in many aquatic animals like bony fishes, teeth and taste buds are colocalized on...
Published on Jan 1, 2015in Current Topics in Developmental Biology
J. Todd Streelman27
Estimated H-index: 27
(Georgia Institute of Technology),
Ryan Fredric Bloomquist5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Georgia Institute of Technology),
Teresa E. Fowler2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Georgia Institute of Technology)
In many aquatic vertebrates, including bony and cartilaginous fishes, teeth and taste buds colocalize on jaw elements. In these animals, taste buds are renewed continuously throughout life, whereas teeth undergo cycled whole-organ replacement by various means. Recently, studies of cichlid fishes have yielded new insights into the development and regeneration of these dental and sensory oral organs. Tooth and taste bud densities covary positively across species with different feeding strategies, ...
Published on Jan 1, 2013in MRS Proceedings
Jason H. Nadler7
Estimated H-index: 7
(GTRI: Georgia Tech Research Institute),
Allison J. Mercer3
Estimated H-index: 3
(GTRI: Georgia Tech Research Institute)
+ 3 AuthorsAngela Lin1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Georgia Institute of Technology)
Published on Feb 10, 2009in PLOS Biology
Gareth J. Fraser17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Georgia Institute of Technology),
C. Darrin Hulsey19
Estimated H-index: 19
(UT: University of Tennessee)
+ 3 AuthorsJ. Todd Streelman27
Estimated H-index: 27
(Georgia Institute of Technology)
Vertebrate dentitions originated in the posterior pharynx of jawless fishes more than half a billion years ago. As gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates) evolved, teeth developed on oral jaws and helped to establish the dominance of this lineage on land and in the sea. The advent of oral jaws was facilitated, in part, by absence of hox gene expression in the first, most anterior, pharyngeal arch. Much later in evolutionary time, teleost fishes evolved a novel toothed jaw in the pharynx, the location o...
Published on Dec 1, 2008in BMC Biology6.72
Gareth J. Fraser17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Georgia Institute of Technology),
Ryan Fredric Bloomquist5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Georgia Institute of Technology),
J. Todd Streelman27
Estimated H-index: 27
(Georgia Institute of Technology)
Background: Periodic patterning of iterative structures is a fundamental process during embryonic organization and development. Studies have shown how gene networks are employed to pattern butterfly eyespots, fly bristles and vertebrate epithelial appendages such as teeth, feathers, hair and mammary glands. Despite knowledge of how these features are organized, little is known about how diversity in periodic patterning is generated in nature. We address this problem through the molecular analysi...
1