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Amanda N. Stephens
Monash University
EngineeringPsychologyCrashAngerSocial psychology
70Publications
17H-index
714Citations
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Publications 69
Newest
#1Kristie Lee Young (Monash University)H-Index: 27
#2Amanda N. Stephens (Monash University)H-Index: 17
Last. Sjaan Koppel (Monash University)H-Index: 22
view all 4 authors...
Abstract Introduction Distraction is an emerging risk factor for cycling safety. Research from Europe, the United States and Japan indicate that the use of electronic devices is prevalent among cyclists in these countries. However, there is little known about the prevalence of Australian cyclists’ engagement in potentially distracting tasks and in non-technology based tasks in particular. This study examined the prevalence of secondary task engagement among Australian cyclists to determine if ch...
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#1Joanne E. Taylor (Massey University)H-Index: 17
#2Mark J.M. Sullman (University of Nicosia)H-Index: 22
Last. Amanda N. Stephens (Monash University, Clayton campus)H-Index: 17
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Abstract. Driving anxiety is a common experience that, for those with high levels of driving anxiety, can markedly interfere with functioning, particularly because of avoidance behavior. The Drivin...
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#1Amanda N. StephensH-Index: 17
Last. Steven TrawleyH-Index: 13
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#1Mark J.M. Sullman (University of Nicosia)H-Index: 1
#1Mark J.M. Sullman (University of Nicosia)H-Index: 22
Last. Joanne E. Taylor (Massey University)H-Index: 17
view all 3 authors...
Abstract The Driver Behaviour Questionnaire (DBQ) is the most commonly used framework for investigating the relationship between self-reported driving behaviour and crash involvement. However, in spite of the fact that the scale is almost 30 years old, the factor structure of the scale and relationship to crashes in New Zealand remains under-researched. The present study set out to establish the factor structure of the DBQ in a sample of New Zealand private vehicle drivers and to examine the ade...
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#1Mark J.M. Sullman (University of Nicosia)H-Index: 22
#2Amanda N. Stephens (Monash University, Clayton campus)H-Index: 17
Last. Joanne E. Taylor (Massey University)H-Index: 17
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Abstract It is well established that angry and, subsequently, aggressive drivers pose a problem for road safety. Over recent years, there has been an increase in the number of published studies examining driver anger, particularly using the Driving Anger Scale (DAS). The DAS measures six broad types of situations likely to provoke anger while driving (i.e., police presence, illegal driving, discourtesy, traffic obstructions, slower drivers, and hostile gestures). The majority of the recent studi...
1 CitationsSource
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Abstract Although interest in driver anger has increased over the past few decades, the scales for measuring the tendency to driving anger have remained relatively unchanged in terms of the items within them. However, in more recent studies, researchers have found it necessary to modify these instruments, sometimes considerably, suggesting that scales to measure how drivers feel about driving require updating. This paper reports two studies aimed at developing an updated measure for trait driver...
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#1Amanda N. Stephens (Monash University, Clayton campus)H-Index: 17
#2Steve O׳Hern (Monash University, Clayton campus)H-Index: 4
Last. Sjaan Koppel (Monash University, Clayton campus)H-Index: 22
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Abstract There is a paucity of research regarding aggressive behaviours of on-road cyclists and the consequences that aggression may have on their safety. To address this, we examined self-reported anger-based aggression in a sample of “active” cyclists (N = 623: males = 69%) defined as those who regularly ride a bicycle on-road (all rode at least once a week, 64% rode between 4–7 days per week). Using the Cyclist Anger Expression Inventory (CAX) three broad types of anger-based aggression were ...
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#1Kristie Lee Young (Monash University)H-Index: 27
#2Sjaan Koppel (Monash University)H-Index: 22
Last. Craig Hassed (Monash University)H-Index: 15
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Distracted driving is a major public health concern because of its potential costs of injury, mortality, and property damage. Understanding the psychological factors that underlie drivers’ willingness to engage in distracting activities despite the clear safety risks can help to identify interventions to mitigate this dangerous behavior. This study examined if mindfulness, defined as one’s attention to and awareness of oneself and the present situation, predicts driver engagement in a wide range...
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#1Steve O׳Hern (Monash University)H-Index: 4
#2Amanda N. Stephens (Monash University)H-Index: 17
Last. Sjaan Koppel (Monash University)H-Index: 22
view all 4 authors...
Abstract Over the past two decades, there has been a substantial amount of research showing the detrimental influence of trait driver anger on road safety. However, very few studies have investigated this phenomenon in more vulnerable road user groups, such as cyclists. This study administered the Cycling Anger Scale (CAS) to a sample of 636 active cyclists (who regularly ride on-road) to understand the situations that provoke anger in cyclists, and whether this anger differed according to their...
1 CitationsSource
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