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Philip S. Ward
University of California, Davis
67Publications
32H-index
3,441Citations
Publications 67
Newest
#1John T. Longino (UofU: University of Utah)H-Index: 29
#2Michael G. Branstetter (USU: Utah State University)H-Index: 13
Last.Philip S. Ward (UC Davis: University of California, Davis)H-Index: 32
view all 3 authors...
1 CitationsSource
#1Marek L. Borowiec (ASU: Arizona State University)H-Index: 8
#2Christian Rabeling (ASU: Arizona State University)H-Index: 15
Last.Philip S. Ward (UC Davis: University of California, Davis)H-Index: 32
view all 6 authors...
Knowledge of the internal phylogeny and evolutionary history of ants (Formicidae), the world's most species-rich clade of eusocial organisms, has dramatically improved since the advent of molecular phylogenetics. A number of relationships at the subfamily level, however, remain uncertain. Key unresolved issues include placement of the root of the ant tree of life and the relationships among the so-called poneroid subfamilies. Here we assemble a new data set to attempt a resolution of these two p...
6 CitationsSource
#1Bonnie B. Blaimer (NCSU: North Carolina State University)H-Index: 11
#2Philip S. Ward (UC Davis: University of California, Davis)H-Index: 32
Last.Seán G. Brady (National Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 30
view all 5 authors...
6 CitationsSource
#1Sean B. Menke (Lake Forest College)H-Index: 14
#2Philip S. Ward (UC Davis: University of California, Davis)H-Index: 32
Last.David A. Holway (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 37
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The ecological effects of species introductions can change in magnitude over time, but an understanding of how and why they do so remains incompletely understood. Clarifying this issue requires consideration of how temporal variation in invader traits affects invasion impacts (e.g., through differential effects on the diversity and composition of native species assemblages). We examine the temporal dynamics of Argentine ant invasions in northern California by resurveying 202 sites first sampled ...
2 CitationsSource
#1Jacobus J. Boomsma (UCPH: University of Copenhagen)H-Index: 63
#2Seán G. Brady (Smithsonian Institution)H-Index: 30
Last.Sze Huei Yek (UNIL: University of Lausanne)H-Index: 8
view all 56 authors...
8 Citations
#1Michael G. Branstetter (UofU: University of Utah)H-Index: 13
#2John T. Longino (UofU: University of Utah)H-Index: 29
Last.Brant C. Faircloth (LSU: Louisiana State University)H-Index: 34
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Summary Targeted enrichment of conserved genomic regions (e.g. ultraconserved elements or UCEs) has emerged as a promising tool for inferring evolutionary history in many organismal groups. Because the UCE approach is still relatively new, much remains to be learned about how best to identify UCE loci and design baits to enrich them. We test an updated UCE identification and bait design workflow for the insect order Hymenoptera, with a particular focus on ants. The new strategy augments a previo...
45 CitationsSource
#1Michael G. Branstetter (UofU: University of Utah)H-Index: 13
#2Bryan N. Danforth (Cornell University)H-Index: 43
Last.Seán G. Brady (National Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 30
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Summary The stinging wasps (Hymenoptera: Aculeata) are an extremely diverse lineage of hymenopteran insects, encompassing over 70,000 described species and a diversity of life history traits, including ectoparasitism, cleptoparasitism, predation, pollen feeding (bees [Anthophila] and Masarinae), and eusociality (social vespid wasps, ants, and some bees) [1]. The most well-studied lineages of Aculeata are the ants, which are ecologically dominant in most terrestrial ecosystems [2], and the bees, ...
103 CitationsSource
#1Philip S. Ward (UC Davis: University of California, Davis)H-Index: 32
#2Michael G. Branstetter (UofU: University of Utah)H-Index: 13
Phylogenetic and biogeographic analyses can enhance our understanding of multispecies interactions by placing the origin and evolution of such interactions in a temporal and geographical context. W...
18 CitationsSource
#1Philip S. Ward (UC Davis: University of California, Davis)H-Index: 32
The Pseudomyrmex ferrugineus group contains the Mesoamerican acacia-ants, an assemblage of species that inhabit and protect swollen-thorn acacias ( Vachellia spp.). Recent phylogenetic studies have confirmed the existence of two generalist (dead twig-inhabiting) species that are embedded within the P. ferrugineus group. They are described here as P. evitus sp. nov. (occurring from Mexico to Costa Rica) and P. feralis sp. nov. (Guatemala). The morphological definition of the P. ferrugineus group ...
3 CitationsSource
#1Philip S. Ward (UC: University of California)H-Index: 32
#2Seán G. Brady (Smithsonian Institution)H-Index: 30
Last.Ted R. Schultz (UC: University of California)H-Index: 35
view all 4 authors...
6 CitationsSource
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