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Hilke Brockmann
Jacobs University Bremen
15Publications
6H-index
385Citations
Publications 15
Newest
#1Hilke Brockmann (JU: Jacobs University Bremen)H-Index: 6
#2Anne Maren Koch (JU: Jacobs University Bremen)H-Index: 1
Last.Christofer Edling (Lund University)H-Index: 15
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Women with managerial careers are significantly less satisfied with their life than their male counterparts. Why? In a representative German panel dataset (GSOEP) we find biological constraints and substitutive mechanisms determining the subjective well-being of female managers. Women’s terminated fertility has a negative impact on women’s life satisfaction between the ages of 35 and 45, when managerial careers usually take off. Money and spare time can compensate for this biological difference....
1 CitationsSource
#1Hilke Brockmann (JU: Jacobs University Bremen)H-Index: 6
#2Philipp Genschel (EUI: European University Institute)H-Index: 19
Last.Laura Seelkopf (University of Bremen)H-Index: 5
view all 3 authors...
Can governments increase tax compliance by rewarding honest taxpayers? We conducted a controlled laboratory experiment comparing tax compliance under a “deterrence” baseline with tax compliance under two “reward” treatments: a “donation” treatment giving taxpayers a say in the spending purposes of their payments and a “lucky” treatment giving taxpayers the (highly unlikely) chance of winning a lottery. The reward treatments significantly affected tax behaviour but not in a straightforward manner...
11 CitationsSource
#1Maike Schulz (University of Bremen)H-Index: 3
#2Anton E. Kunst (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 75
Last.Hilke Brockmann (JU: Jacobs University Bremen)H-Index: 6
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In line with the theory of supplier-induced demand, an increased physician density often goes along with a higher utilization of medical services, including dental services. This study aimed to assess whether dentist density and self-employment are related to dental care use, and whether these relat
6 CitationsSource
#1Hilke Brockmann (JU: Jacobs University Bremen)H-Index: 6
#2Maike SchulzH-Index: 3
Germany has created and maintained the world's oldest universal health insurance system based on solidarity and pay-as-you-go principles. Since 1883, mandatory health insurance has been steadily extended to new population groups. Benefits have increased and become more comprehensive. Since 1970, nearly 90 percent of the total population have been members of a statutory sickness fund; the remainder are privately insured. In 1995, Germany was the first country in the world to implement statutory l...
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#1Hilke Brockmann (JU: Jacobs University Bremen)H-Index: 6
Familien schaffen Gesundheit, aber der Wandel familiarer Strukturen wird fur viele negative gesundheitliche Veranderungen in der Bevolkerung verantwortlich gemacht. Wie entwickelt sich die Gesundheit von jungeren Kindern heute in Deutschland, wenn Eltern zusammen oder getrennt leben? Anhand der Daten des Sozio-oekonomischen Panels konnen wir zeigen, dass Kinder in traditionellen Ehen nicht generell gesunder sind als Kinder in anderen Familien. So ist das Risiko, dass Kinder an einer gesundheitli...
1 CitationsSource
#1Hilke Brockmann (JU: Jacobs University Bremen)H-Index: 6
#2Song Yan (JU: Jacobs University Bremen)
Does consumption make people happy? The standard answer from economics is: Yes! By assumption, consumers consume because that increases their utility. However, empirical studies of US consumer behavior reveal striking trends in conspicuous and harmful consumption. New findings in happiness research explain when consumption makes people unhappy and why unhappy consumers cannot easily stop their malconsumption. Researchers also identify escape routes both at the individual and the societal level. ...
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#1Hilke Brockmann (JU: Jacobs University Bremen)H-Index: 6
#2Jan Delhey (JU: Jacobs University Bremen)H-Index: 19
If you ask a chef, a physician, or a teacher the question: “Is more always better,” they will probably answer: “No”. Of course, it depends on the dish you are cooking, the illness you are curing, and the subject you are teaching. But these professionals know when additional ingredients spoil the dish, additional treatment harms the patient, and additional learning material frustrates the student. If you put the same question to an economist or a consumer, though, it is less clear what the answer...
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#1Hilke BrockmannH-Index: 6
#2Jan DelheyH-Index: 19
Chapter 1. Is More Always Better? An Introduction Hilke Brockmann and Jan Delhey.- Chapter 2. When the Pursuit of More Backfires - The American Experiment Peter Whybrow.- Chapter 3. More Nonsense and Less Happiness: The Uninteded Effects of Artificial Competitions Mathias Binswanger.- Chapter 4. Happiness by Maximization? Kurt Bayertz.- Chapter 5. Maximization and the Good Valerie Tiberius.- Chapter 6. How Wise is Mother Nature? Maximization, Optimization and Short-Sighted Resource Use in Biolog...
#1Hilke BrockmannH-Index: 6
#2Jan DelheyH-Index: 19
5 CitationsSource
#1Hilke Brockmann (JU: Jacobs University Bremen)H-Index: 6
#2Philipp Genschel (EUI: European University Institute)H-Index: 19
Last.Laura Seelkopf (University of Bremen)H-Index: 5
view all 3 authors...
The budget crisis in Greece is only the latest illustration of the detrimental effects of tax evasion. How can governments increase tax compliance? Based on insights from behavioral economics and happiness research we conduct a laboratory experiment on framing effects on tax compliance. Following the idea that paying taxes in a "€˜punishment"€™ frame is costly (stressful) even to the honest taxpayer, we use two positive frames to increase subjective (but not material!) utility from compliance: a...
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