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Sally K. May
Griffith University
ArchaeologyGeographyPaintingRock artIndigenous
47Publications
8H-index
222Citations
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Publications 52
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This paper explores the complex story of a particular style of rock art in western Arnhem Land known as ‘Painted Hands’. Using new evidence from recent fieldwork, we present a definition for their style, distribution and place in the stylistic chronologies of this region. We argue these motifs played an important cultural role in Aboriginal society during the period of European settlement in the region. We explore the complex messages embedded in the design features of the Painted Hands, arguing...
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#1Liam Brady (Flinders University)
#2Sally K. May (Griffith University)H-Index: 8
Last. Patrick Lamilami (LNU: Linnaeus University)
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#1Sally K. May (Griffith University)H-Index: 8
#2Jillian Huntley (Griffith University)H-Index: 7
Last. Paul Tacon (Griffith University)H-Index: 18
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This paper presents findings from a recent study of the Anbangbang Gallery in the Burrungkuy (Nourlangie) site complex of Kakadu National Park, Australia. Using new technologies alongside established methods for rock art documentation, we discuss the complexity and uniqueness of Anbangbang Gallery as an icon of Australian rock art. We have taken a comprehensive approach to our investigations, deliberately linking new technologies and scientific analysis with other archaeological and anthropologi...
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#1Catherine Frieman (ANU: Australian National University)H-Index: 6
#2Sally K. May (Griffith University)H-Index: 8
In this paper, we look at the ways in which rock art encapsulates and expresses the tension between tradition and innovation in northern Australia during the period of European colonization. The appearance of new motifs and techniques for producing rock art in the recent past sits alongside the continuation of "traditional" practices reflecting thousands of years of artistic expression. Using case studies from Arnhem Land, we reflect on both ethnographic and archaeological evidence in order to i...
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#1Joakim GoldhahnH-Index: 9
#2Sally K. MayH-Index: 8
#1Paul TaconH-Index: 18
#2Sally K. MayH-Index: 8
Last. Murray GardeH-Index: 1
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he Anbangbang Gallery in the Burrungkuy area of Kakadu National Park in-cludes some of the most iconic rock art imagery from Australia. Visited and enjoyed by tens of thousands of visitors every year it stands as a testament to Aboriginal culture and provides a glimpse into the remarkable rock art traditions of this region. Yet, most visitors are surprised to discover that rock art was still being produced at this site in the 1960s. In this paper, we explore the most recent rock art created at t...
1 Citations
#1Joakim Goldhahn (Griffith University)H-Index: 9
#2Sally K. May (Griffith University)H-Index: 8
How can rock art signal contact between different social groups and cultures? In this special collection of papers for Australian Archaeology, we find several different answers to this question, based on a number of Australian and International case studies first presented at The Second International Contact Rock Art Conference in Darwin, September 2013 and further developed in the years since. In this introductory paper, we set these important depictions in a global context, and explore some of...
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#1John A. Hayward (Flinders University)H-Index: 2
#2Iain G. Johnston (ANU: Australian National University)H-Index: 2
Last. Paul Tacon (Griffith University)H-Index: 18
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This paper addresses the motivations for producing the rare object stencils found in the rock art of western Arnhem Land. We present evidence for 84 stencils recorded as part of the Mirarr Gunwarddebim project in western Arnhem Land, northern Australia. Ranging from boomerangs to dilly bags, armlets and spearthrowers, this assemblage suggests something other than a common or ongoing culture practice of stencilling objects used in everyday life. Instead, we suggest that these stencils represent a...
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#1Daryl Wesley (Flinders University)H-Index: 5
#2Mirani Litster (ANU: Australian National University)H-Index: 4
Last. Paul Tacon (Griffith University)H-Index: 18
view all 9 authors...
The archaeology of Bald Rock 1, Bald Rock 2 and Bald Rock 3 at the sandstone outcrop of Maliwawa has established ∼25,000 years of Indigenous occupation in the Wellington Range, northwestern Arnhem Land. Flaked stone artefacts were found from the beginning of the sequence, with ground-edge axes, pounding and grinding technology and ochre recovered from deposits dating from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) to the recent contact period. Maliwawa was occupied during the LGM and other major regional en...
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#1Duncan WrightTimH-Index: 8
#2Michelle C. LangleyH-Index: 11
Last. Sally K. MayH-Index: 8
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