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Jenny Chesters
University of Melbourne
Higher educationSociologyLabour economicsEconomicsEconomic growth
54Publications
8H-index
152Citations
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Publications 87
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#1Jenny Chesters (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 8
#2Hernán CuervoH-Index: 8
Last. Jun FuH-Index: 2
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ABSTRACTAs the Australian labour market restructures and the pace of technological advances quickens, reskilling and up-skilling are now required for sustained employability. Thus, many adults emba...
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#1Jenny ChestersH-Index: 8
#2Hernán CuervoH-Index: 8
Last. Johanna WynH-Index: 29
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In 2017, Life Patterns participants in both cohorts were asked to nominate the most important issues facing Australia. Their responses, which reveal the complex nature of generations, both reflect and transcend generation and life-stage. Both cohorts reveal deep concerns about the environment; cohort 1 ranked the next most important issues for Australia as being the cost of living, security and terrorism, the economy, and education. Cohort 2 ranked the next most important issues facing Australia...
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#1Johanna WynH-Index: 29
#2Helen CahillH-Index: 12
Last. Jenny ChestersH-Index: 8
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#1Jenny Chesters (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 8
This chapter addresses the process of transition from education to work, a central transformation theme in the field of youth studies, one that has contributed significantly to the constitution of a new adulthood. Analysing Life Patterns data from the two cohorts, it contributes to an emerging consensus that higher education no longer provides protection against unemployment, underemployment and precarious employment. Focussing on three decades from 1991, the analysis demonstrates how the distin...
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ABSTRACTDebates around new patterns of youth transitions to adulthood have been well documented in academic research. In a similar vein, there is an important array of research on the rise of preca...
1 CitationsSource
#1Jenny Chesters (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 8
#2Johanna Wyn (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 29
The increasingly complex relationship between educational qualifications and employment is an integral, yet little-explored dimension of the labour market developments that have come to be referred...
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#1Hernán Cuervo (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 8
#2Jenny Chesters (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 8
Last. Lucinda Aberdeen (La Trobe University)H-Index: 4
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The Australian Government’s efforts to increase the proportion of Australians with university-level qualifications has placed educational aspirations at the forefront of education policy. Despite increasing numbers of young Australians enrolling in higher education, regional and rural students continue to be underrepresented in university populations. Previous research shows that levels of social capital are positively associated with educational aspirations; therefore, in this paper, we examine...
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#1Jenny Chesters (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 8
#2Jonathan F. Smith (Monash University)H-Index: 5
Last. Dan Woodman (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 14
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Young adults in Australia, and in many other advanced countries, are more likely to be highly educated but less likely to be in full-time employment than their parents were. Although insecure employment has long been a feature of labour markets, increased labour flexibility in recent decades has resulted in insecure employment becoming entrenched. In this article, we draw on data from young people in their early twenties to examine the interrelationships between work and life. Although we focus ...
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#1Jenny Chesters (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 8
ABSTRACTOpportunities for social mobility are generated by education systems designed to alleviate the effects of social origin by providing equality of opportunities and resources. The persistence of the strong association between socioeconomic status (SES) and child’s educational achievement and attainment suggests that social origin continues to play an integral role in the educational outcomes of successive generations of Australians. Sociologists draw on a range of theoretical perspectives ...
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