Match!
Daniel P. Costa
University of California, Santa Cruz
ForagingPredationEcologyMirounga angustirostrisBiology
508Publications
72H-index
17.6kCitations
What is this?
Publications 522
Newest
#1Kaori Yoshino (Graduate University for Advanced Studies)H-Index: 1
#2Akinori Takahashi (National Institute of Polar Research)H-Index: 30
Last. Yasuhiko Naito (National Institute of Polar Research)H-Index: 46
view all 9 authors...
Knowledge of the diet of marine mammals is fundamental to understanding their role in marine ecosystems and response to environmental change. Recently, animal-borne video cameras have revealed the diet of marine mammals that make short foraging trips. However, novel approaches that allocate video time to target prey capture events is required to obtain diet information for species that make long foraging trips over great distances. We combined satellite telemetry and depth recorders with newly d...
1 CitationsSource
Source
Source
#1Daniel P. Costa (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 72
#2Chris Fritsen (DRI: Desert Research Institute)H-Index: 2
Source
#1Daniel P. Costa (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 72
#2Chris Fritsen (DRI: Desert Research Institute)H-Index: 2
Source
#1Daniel P. Costa (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 72
#2Chris Fritsen (DRI: Desert Research Institute)H-Index: 2
Source
#1Markus Horning (OSU: Oregon State University)H-Index: 23
#2Russel D. AndrewsH-Index: 22
Last. Jamie N. Womble (NPS: National Park Service)H-Index: 12
view all 24 authors...
Pinnipeds spend large portions of their lives at sea, submerged, or hauled-out on land, often on remote off-shore islands. This fundamentally limits access by researchers to critical parts of pinniped life history and has spurred the development and implementation of a variety of externally attached telemetry devices (ETDs) to collect information about movement patterns, physiology and ecology of marine animals when they cannot be directly observed. ETDs are less invasive and easier to apply tha...
Source
#1Theresa R. Keates (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)
#2Kudela M R (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 45
Last. Daniel P. Costa (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 72
view all 6 authors...
Abstract Chlorophyll concentration in the ocean is a metric for phytoplankton biomass, which forms the base of most pelagic food webs and is a critical component of the planet's carbon cycle. Phytoplankton biomass has been designated an Essential Ocean Variable (EOV), but in situ chlorophyll measurements are challenging and expensive to obtain, especially in remote regions. We deployed 11 Conductivity-Temperature-Depth-Fluorescence (CTDF) instruments on 15 northern elephant seals (Mirounga angus...
Source
#1Ana M. M. Sequeira (UWA: University of Western Australia)H-Index: 14
#2Graeme C. Hays (Deakin University)H-Index: 70
Last. Carlos M. Duarte (KAUST: King Abdullah University of Science and Technology)H-Index: 106
view all 22 authors...
Tracking data have led to evidence-based conservation of marine megafauna, but a disconnect remains between the many 1000s of individual animals that have been tracked and the use of these data in conservation and management actions. Furthermore, the focus of most conservation efforts is within Exclusive Economic Zones despite the ability of these species to move 1000s of kilometers across multiple national jurisdictions. To assist the goal of the United Nations General Assembly’s recent effort ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Sp KirkmanH-Index: 9
#1Stephen P. KirkmanH-Index: 11
Last. John P. Y. Arnould (Deakin University)H-Index: 36
view all 8 authors...
While marine top predators can play a critical role in ecosystem structure and dynamics through their effects on prey populations, how the predators function in this role is often not well understo...
Source
12345678910