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Norbert Schwarz
University of Southern California
Developmental psychologyPsychologyCognitionCognitive psychologySocial psychology
484Publications
96H-index
46.6kCitations
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Publications 497
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#1Y. Charles Zhang (UCR: University of California, Riverside)
#2Norbert Schwarz (SC: University of Southern California)H-Index: 96
Abstract People are more likely to accept a claim as true, the more often they heard it in the past. We test whether using frequently encountered formal characteristics in constructing a novel claim increases its acceptance as true. A corpus analysis (study 1) established that, in everyday language use, lower-bound modifiers (e.g., “more than”) collocate more frequently with large numbers than upper-bound modifiers (e.g., “less than”). This regularity influences which numbers people expect to fo...
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#1Rainer GreifenederH-Index: 14
Last. Norbert SchwarzH-Index: 96
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#1Spike W. S. Lee (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 13
#2Julie Y. Huang (SBU: Stony Brook University)
Last. Norbert Schwarz (SC: University of Southern California)H-Index: 96
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People’s assessment of risks is swayed by their current feelings. COVID-19 invokes powerful feelings because it is (i) a salient, enormous threat, (ii) unfamiliar, and (iii) intertwined with xenophobia. These three factors are known to exert predictable influence on people’s risk overgeneralization, policy preference, and sociopolitical attitudes. We provide a succinct, illustrative review of empirical work on these dynamics in times of a disease outbreak (e.g., the 2009 H1N1 swine flu, the 2014...
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#1Spike W. S. Lee (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 13
#2Norbert Schwarz (SC: University of Southern California)H-Index: 96
Experimental work has revealed causal links between physical cleansing and various psychological variables. Empirically, how robust are they? Theoretically, how do they operate? Major prevailing accounts focus on morality or disgust, capturing a subset of cleansing effects, but cannot easily handle cleansing effects in non-moral, non-disgusting contexts. Building on grounded views on cognitive processes and known properties of mental procedures, we propose grounded procedures of separation as a ...
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#1Jonathon P. Schuldt (Cornell University)H-Index: 16
#2Peter K. Enns (Cornell University)H-Index: 13
Last. Norbert Schwarz (SC: University of Southern California)H-Index: 96
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#1Robert W. Smith (Tilburg University)H-Index: 6
#2Jesse Chandler (Mathematica Policy Research)H-Index: 21
Last. Norbert Schwarz (SC: University of Southern California)H-Index: 96
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#1Iris K. Schneider (University of Cologne)H-Index: 13
Last. Norbert Schwarz (SC: University of Southern California)H-Index: 96
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Abstract In language, people often refer to decision difficulty in terms of spatial distance. Specifically, decision-difficulty is expressed as proximity, for instance when people say that a decision was “too close to call”. Although these expressions are metaphorical, we argue, in line with research on conceptual metaphor theory, that they reflect how people think about difficult decisions. Thus, here we examine whether close spatial distance can actually make decision-making harder. In six exp...
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#1David B. Newman (SC: University of Southern California)H-Index: 4
#2Norbert Schwarz (SC: University of Southern California)H-Index: 96
Last. Arthur A. Stone (SC: University of Southern California)H-Index: 77
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ABSTRACTResearchers can characterize people’s well-being by asking them to provide global evaluations of large parts of their life at one time or by obtaining repeated assessments during their dail...
1 CitationsSource
#1David B. Newman (SC: University of Southern California)H-Index: 4
#2Matthew E. Sachs (SC: University of Southern California)H-Index: 6
Last. Norbert Schwarz (SC: University of Southern California)H-Index: 96
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#1Eryn. J. Newman (ANU: Australian National University)H-Index: 1
#2Madeline C. Jalbert (SC: University of Southern California)H-Index: 1
Last. Deva P. Ly (ANU: Australian National University)H-Index: 1
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Abstract Ease of processing—cognitive fluency—is a central input in assessments of truth, but little is known about individual differences in susceptibility to fluency-based biases in truth assessment. Focusing on two paradigms—truthiness and the illusory truth effect—we consider the role of Need for Cognition (NFC), an individual difference variable capturing one’s preference for elaborative thought. Across five experiments, we replicated basic truthiness and illusory truth effects. We found ve...
2 CitationsSource
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