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Sarah Harper
University of British Columbia
Marine conservationEconomicsGeographyFisheryFishing
54Publications
10H-index
635Citations
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Publications 60
Newest
#1Sarah Harper (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 10
#1Sarah HarperH-Index: 17
Last. U. Rashid SumailaH-Index: 32
view all 5 authors...
The role that women play in fisheries around the world is receiving increasing international attention yet the contributions by women to fisheries catches continues to be overlooked by society, industry and policy makers. Here, we address this lack of visibility with a global estimation of small-scale fisheries catches by women. Our estimates reveal that women participate in small-scale fishing activities in all regions of the world, with approximately 2.1 million (+/- 86,000) women accounting f...
2 CitationsSource
#1Evan J. Andrews (UW: University of Waterloo)H-Index: 3
#2Sarah Harper (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 10
Last. Charlotte K. Whitney (UVic: University of Victoria)H-Index: 6
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Source
#1Nathan J. Bennett (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 17
#2Andrés M. Cisneros-Montemayor (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 12
Last. U. Rashid Sumaila (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 32
view all 26 authors...
The global rush to develop the ‘blue economy’ risks harming both the marine environment and human wellbeing. Bold policies and actions are urgently needed. We identify five priorities to chart a course towards an environmentally sustainable and socially equitable blue economy.
8 CitationsSource
#1Sarah Harper (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 10
#2Anne K. Salomon (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 19
Last. U. Rashid Sumaila (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 32
view all 7 authors...
While the agency of individuals has been identified as a key factor in triggering governance transformations in social-ecological systems, more research attention is needed on how the social position of the actors involved influences these processes of change. Here, we highlight how the unique position of Indigenous women in a recent fishery conflict brought strength to this resource struggle and led to changes in the management of Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) on the Central Coast of Britis...
3 CitationsSource
#1Andrés M. Cisneros-Montemayor (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 12
#2Sarah Harper (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 10
Last. Travis C. Tai (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 3
view all 3 authors...
3 CitationsSource
#1Nathan J. Bennett (Stanford University)H-Index: 17
#2Maery Kaplan-Hallam (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 5
Last. Megan Bailey (Dal: Dalhousie University)H-Index: 11
view all 27 authors...
• Access to marine resources and the ocean is important for the well-being of coastal communities.
10 CitationsSource
#1Katherine Seto (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 7
#2Dyhia Belhabib (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 11
Last. Daniel Pauly (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 93
view all 11 authors...
Abstract In countries like Sierra Leone, where stock assessments based on fisheries-independent data and complex population models are financially and technically challenging, catch statistics may be used to infer fluctuations in fish stocks where more precise data are not available. However, FAO FishStat, the most widely-used time-series data on global fisheries ‘catches’ (actually ‘landings’), does not account for Illegal, Unreported, and Unregulated (IUU) catches and relies on statistics prov...
9 CitationsSource
#1Sarah Harper (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 10
#2Charlotte Grubb (Oceana)H-Index: 1
Last. Ussif Rashid Sumaila (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 40
view all 4 authors...
ABSTRACTThe contribution by women to fisheries economies globally continues to be overlooked, in part, because “fishing” is often narrowly defined as catching fish at sea, from a vessel, using specialized gears. Both men and women are involved in fisheries, but often in different roles and activities. Fisheries research, management, and policy have traditionally focused on direct, formal, and paid fishing activities—that are often dominated by men, ignoring those that are indirect, informal, and...
9 CitationsSource
#1Elena M. FinkbeinerH-Index: 15
#2Nathan J. BennettH-Index: 17
Last. Megan BaileyH-Index: 11
view all 27 authors...
1 Citations
#1K. ZylichH-Index: 6
#2M. AngH-Index: 1
Last. Dirk Zeller (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 41
view all 5 authors...
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