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Cheong Xin Chan
University of Queensland
83Publications
19H-index
1,347Citations
Publications 83
Newest
Published on Jul 16, 2019in bioRxiv
Timothy G. Stephens3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UQ: University of Queensland),
Raúl A. González-Pech2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UQ: University of Queensland)
+ 4 AuthorsCheong Xin Chan19
Estimated H-index: 19
(UQ: University of Queensland)
Dinoflagellates are diverse, ecologically important phytoplankton in marine and freshwater environments. Here, we present two draft de novo diploid genome assemblies of the free-living dinoflagellate Polarella glacialis , isolated from the Arctic and Antarctica. For each genome, we predicted >50,000 high-quality genes supported by full-length transcriptome data. About 68% of the total genome sequence is repetitive, and includes long terminal repeats that likely contribute to intra-species struct...
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Published on May 16, 2019in DNA Research 4.00
Dana C. Price19
Estimated H-index: 19
(RU: Rutgers University),
Ursula Goodenough49
Estimated H-index: 49
(WashU: Washington University in St. Louis)
+ 12 AuthorsUgo Cenci7
Estimated H-index: 7
(CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique)
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Published on May 1, 2019in Trends in Ecology and Evolution 15.24
Raúl A. González-Pech2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UQ: University of Queensland),
Debashish Bhattacharya64
Estimated H-index: 64
(RU: Rutgers University)
+ 1 AuthorsCheong Xin Chan19
Estimated H-index: 19
(UQ: University of Queensland)
Coral reefs are sustained by symbioses between corals and symbiodiniacean dinoflagellates. These symbioses vary in the extent of their permanence in and specificity to the host. Although dinoflagellates are primarily free-living, Symbiodiniaceae diversified mainly as symbiotic lineages. Their genomes reveal conserved symbiosis-related gene functions and high sequence divergence. However, the evolutionary mechanisms that underpin the transition from the free-living lifestyle to symbiosis remain p...
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Published on Apr 16, 2019in bioRxiv
Andrzej Zielezinski7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań),
Hani Z Girgis2
Estimated H-index: 2
(TU: University of Tulsa)
+ 16 AuthorsMichael S. Waterman63
Estimated H-index: 63
(SC: University of Southern California)
Alignment-free (AF) sequence comparison is attracting persistent interest driven by data-intensive applications. Hence, many AF procedures have been proposed in recent years, but a lack of a clearly defined benchmarking consensus hampers their performance assessment. Here, we present a community resource (http://afproject.org) to establish standards for comparing alignment-free approaches across different areas of sequence-based research. We characterize 74 AF methods available in 24 software to...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 25, 2019in Briefings in Bioinformatics 9.10
Guillaume Bernard5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UQ: University of Queensland),
Cheong Xin Chan19
Estimated H-index: 19
(UQ: University of Queensland)
+ 5 AuthorsMark A. Ragan47
Estimated H-index: 47
(UQ: University of Queensland)
We are amidst an ongoing flood of sequence data arising from the application of high-throughput technologies, and a concomitant fundamental revision in our understanding of how genomes evolve individually and within the biosphere. Workflows for phylogenomic inference must accommodate data that are not only much larger than before, but often more error prone and perhaps misassembled, or not assembled in the first place. Moreover, genomes of microbes, viruses and plasmids evolve not only by tree-l...
8 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 12, 2018in Bioinformatics 4.53
Raúl A. González-Pech2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UQ: University of Queensland),
Timothy G. Stephens3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UQ: University of Queensland),
Cheong Xin Chan19
Estimated H-index: 19
(UQ: University of Queensland)
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Published on Dec 1, 2018
Huanle Liu1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UQ: University of Queensland),
Timothy G. Stephens3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UQ: University of Queensland)
+ 12 AuthorsDavid G. Bourne46
Estimated H-index: 46
(JCU: James Cook University)
In the original HTML version of the paper, the following affiliation was missing for author Cheong Xin Chan: School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australia. This affiliation was incorrectly assigned to author Pim Bongaerts as “Present Address”. All affiliations were published correctly in the PDF version of the paper and have now been corrected in the HTML.
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Published on Dec 1, 2018
Huanle Liu1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UQ: University of Queensland),
Timothy G. Stephens3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UQ: University of Queensland)
+ 12 AuthorsSylvain Forêt25
Estimated H-index: 25
(JCU: James Cook University)
Symbiosis between dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium and reef-building corals forms the trophic foundation of the world’s coral reef ecosystems. Here we present the first draft genome of Symbiodinium goreaui (Clade C, type C1: 1.03 Gbp), one of the most ubiquitous endosymbionts associated with corals, and an improved draft genome of Symbiodinium kawagutii (Clade F, strain CS-156: 1.05 Gbp) to further elucidate genomic signatures of this symbiosis. Comparative analysis of four available Sy...
4 Citations Source Cite
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