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Charles Robin
University of Melbourne
40Publications
18H-index
2,613Citations
Publications 40
Newest
#1Amol B Ghodke (University of Melbourne)
#2Robert T. Good (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 21
Last.Charles Robin (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 18
view all 6 authors...
Myzus persicae is a major pest of many crops including canola and Brassica vegetables, partly because it vectors plant viruses. Previously it has been reported that double-stranded RNA delivered to aphids by injection, artificial diet or transgenic plants has knocked down target genes and caused phenotypic effects. While these studies suggest that RNA interference (RNAi) might be used to suppress aphid populations, none have shown effects sufficient for field control. The current study analyses ...
#1Yao-ban Chan (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 8
#2Charles Robin (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 18
Abstract The phylogenetic trees of genes and the species which they belong to are similar, but distinct due to various evolutionary processes which affect genes but do not create new species. Reconciliations map the gene tree into the species tree, explaining the discrepancies by events including gene duplications and losses. However, when duplicate genes undergo recombination (a phenomenon known as paralog exchange, or non-allelic homologous recombination), the phylogeny of the genes becomes a ...
#1Alexandre Fournier-Level (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 13
#2Robert T. Good (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 21
Last.Ary A. Hoffmann (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 91
view all 10 authors...
Imidacloprid, the world’s most used insecticide, has caused considerable controversy due to harmful effects on non-pest species and increasing evidence showing that insecticides have become the primary selective force in many insect species. The genetic response to insecticides is heterogeneous across populations and environments, leading to more complex patterns of genetic variation than previously thought. This motivated the investigation of imidacloprid resistance at different temperatures in...
#1Charles Robin (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 18
#2Paul Battlay (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 5
Last.Alexandre Fournier-Level (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 13
view all 3 authors...
If we are to fully comprehend the evolution of insect diversity at a genomic level we need to understand how natural selection can alter genetically encoded characters within populations. Genetic association panels have the potential to be standard bearers in this endeavour. They enable the mapping of phenotypes to genotypes at unprecedented resolution while simultaneously providing population genomic samples that can be interrogated for the tell-tale signs of selection. Analyses of these panels...
#1Caitlyn Perry (University of Melbourne)
#2Jack Scanlan (University of Melbourne)
Last.Charles Robin (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 18
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Several hundred insect genome assemblies are already publicly available, and this total grows on a weekly basis. A major challenge now confronting insect science is how best to use genomic data to improve our understanding of insect biology. We consider a framework for genome analysis based on functional affiliation, i.e. groups of genes involved in the same biological process or pathway, and explore how such an approach furthers our understanding of several aspects of insect phenotype. We antic...
#1Llewellyn Green (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 2
#2Paul Battlay (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 5
Last.Charles Robin (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 18
view all 5 authors...
Insecticide resistance is a paradigm of microevolution and insecticides are responsible for the strongest cases of recent selection in the genome of Drosophila melanogaster . Here we use a naive population and a novel insecticide class to examine the ab initio genetic architecture of a potential selective response. Genome wide association studies of chlorantraniliprole susceptibility reveal variation in a gene of major effect, Stretchin Myosin light chain kinase (Strn-Mlck), which we validate wi...
Over the last 40 years, many types of population genetic markers have been used to assess the population structure of the pest moth species Helicoverpa armigera. While this species is highly vagile, there is evidence of inter-continental population structure. Here, we examine Z-chromosome molecular markers within and between Chinese and Australian populations. Using 1352 polymorphic sites from 40 Z-linked loci, we compared two Chinese populations of moths separated by 700 km and found virtually ...
#1Paul Battlay (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 5
#2Pontus Leblanc (University of Melbourne)
Last.Charles Robin (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 18
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Patterns of nucleotide polymorphism within populations of Drosophila melanogaster suggest that insecticides have been the selective agents driving the strongest recent bouts of positive selection. However, there is a need to explicitly link selective sweeps to the particular insecticide phenotypes that could plausibly account for the drastic selective responses that are observed in these non-target insects. Here, we screen the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel with two common insecticides; mala...
#1Rebecca N. Johnson (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 10
#2Denis O’Meally (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 10
Last.Siobhan Dennison (Australian Museum)H-Index: 3
view all 10 authors...
The koala, the only extant species of the marsupial family Phascolarctidae, is classified as ‘vulnerable’ due to habitat loss and widespread disease. We sequenced the koala genome, producing a complete and contiguous marsupial reference genome, including centromeres. We reveal that the koala’s ability to detoxify eucalypt foliage may be due to expansions within a cytochrome P450 gene family, and its ability to smell, taste and moderate ingestion of plant secondary metabolites may be due to expan...
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