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Aaron S. Benjamin
University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign
105Publications
25H-index
2,316Citations
Publications 105
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#2Michael L. Griffin (UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)
Last.Sarah E. Stanley (UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)H-Index: 1
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Abstract People with larger working memory capacity exhibit enhanced free recall. One explanation for this relationship is that the strategies that people bring to the task of learning and retrieving are superior in learners with high working memory. There is ample evidence that learners with high working memory do indeed bring better strategies to both encoding and retrieval, but as yet little evidence of whether higher working memory is related to greater effectiveness in prioritizing informat...
#1Mark Steyvers (UCI: University of California, Irvine)H-Index: 38
#2Aaron S. Benjamin (UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)H-Index: 25
Large-scale data sets from online training and game platforms offer the opportunity for more extensive and more precise investigations of human learning than is typically achievable in the laboratory. However, because people make their own choices about participation, any investigation into learning using these data sets must simultaneously model performance–that is, the learning function–and participation. Using a data set of 54 million gameplays from the online brain training site Lumosity, we...
#1Geoffrey L. McKinley (Georgia Institute of Technology)H-Index: 1
#2Brian H. Ross (UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)H-Index: 30
Last.Aaron S. Benjamin (UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)H-Index: 25
view all 3 authors...
The reminding effect (Tullis, Benjamin, & Ross, Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 143[4], 1526–1540, 2014) describes the increase in recall of a studied word when a related word is presented later in the study list. However, because the process of reminding is thought to occur during study, measures of test performance are indirect indicators of the process of reminding and are subject to influences that arise during testing. The present research seeks evidence of reminding during enc...
#1Joshua L. Fiechter (UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)H-Index: 2
#2Aaron S. Benjamin (UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)H-Index: 25
Testing is a powerful enhancer of memory. However, if initial encoding is poor, and subsequent retrieval practice is likely to fail, then the benefits of testing are diminished or even eliminated. Previous work has suggested that the benefits of testing may be preserved under difficult conditions with a scaffolded technique called diminishing-cues retrieval practice (DCRP; Fiechter & Benjamin, Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 25(5), 1868–1876, 2018). DCRP provides increasing retrieval demands over...
#1Aaron S. Benjamin (UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)H-Index: 25
#2Michael L. Griffin (UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)
Last.Jeffrey A Douglas (UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)H-Index: 32
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Abstract State-trace analysis provides a direct and transparent way of evaluating a question that is central to many studies of cognitive function: do one or two latent processes underlie performance on a particular task? This evaluation is made using a state-trace plot, which is a bivariate plot of two dependent variables over a dimensional variable that provides the basis for the hypothesized dissociation, and a trace variable, which enables the examination over a range of levels of performanc...
#1Trisha N. Patel (UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)
#2Mark Steyvers (UCI: University of California, Irvine)H-Index: 38
Last.Aaron S. Benjamin (UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)H-Index: 25
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Central to the operation of the Atkinson and Shiffrin’s (Psychology of learning and motivation, 2, 89-195, 1968) model of human memory are a variety of control processes that manage information flow. Research on metacognition reveals that provision of control in laboratory learning tasks is generally beneficial to memory. In this paper, we investigate the novel domain of attentional fluctuations during study. If learners are able to monitor attention, then control over the onset of stimuli shoul...
#1Scott H. Fraundorf (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 9
#2Kathleen L. Hourihan (MUN: Memorial University of Newfoundland)H-Index: 9
Last.Aaron S. Benjamin (UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)H-Index: 25
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#1Melisa Akan (UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)H-Index: 1
#2Sarah E. Stanley (UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)H-Index: 1
Last.Aaron S. Benjamin (UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)H-Index: 25
view all 3 authors...
Abstract The beneficial effect of retrieval practice on memory is a well-established phenomenon. Despite the wealth of research on this testing effect, it is unclear whether the benefits of testing extend beyond the tested information to include memory for the context in which the memoranda were encountered. Three experiments examined the effect of testing on memory for context using a standard variant of a traditional item-context memory task, in which cue-target word pairs (the items) were pre...
#1Joshua L. Fiechter (UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)H-Index: 2
#2Aaron S. Benjamin (UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)H-Index: 25
Retrieval practice has been shown to be a highly effective tool for enhancing memory, a fact that has led to major changes to educational practice and technology. However, when initial learning is poor, initial retrieval practice is unlikely to be successful and long-term benefits of retrieval practice are compromised or nonexistent. Here, we investigate the benefit of a scaffolded retrieval technique called diminishing-cues retrieval practice (Finley, Benjamin, Hays, Bjork, & Kornell, Journal o...
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