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Simon J. Allen
University of Zurich
EcologyBottlenose dolphinPopulationFisheryBiology
105Publications
24H-index
2,324Citations
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Publications 104
Newest
#1Adam EmmerH-Index: 16
#2Stephan Harrison (University of Exeter)H-Index: 32
Last. Christian Huggel (UZH: University of Zurich)H-Index: 46
view all 6 authors...
Abstract Climate change, glacier retreat and glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs) are intertwined. The Cordillera Blanca in Peru has one of the world's longest GLOF records and here we assess the evolution of glacial lakes in the region between 1948 and 2017 and investigate the links to documented GLOFs. We also model future lake evolution under two climate scenarios to provide an assessment of current and future GLOF triggering potential. Our analysis shows that the number of lakes as well as t...
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#1Sonja WildH-Index: 4
#2William Hoppitt (University of Leeds)H-Index: 27
Last. Michael Krützen (UZH: University of Zurich)H-Index: 34
view all 4 authors...
Summary Cultural behavior, which is transmitted among conspecifics through social learning [ 1 ], is found across various taxa [ 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 ]. Vertical social transmission from parent to offspring [ 7 ] is thought to be adaptive because of the parental generation being more skilled than maturing individuals. It is found throughout the animal kingdom, particularly in species with prolonged parental care, e.g., [ 8 , 9 ]. Social learning can also occur among members of the same generation [...
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#1O. O'Brien (UMassD: University of Massachusetts Dartmouth)
#2Simon J. Allen (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 24
Last. Richard C. Connor (UMassD: University of Massachusetts Dartmouth)H-Index: 41
view all 4 authors...
Individuals and groups within the same population may differ in their use of resources. Also referred to as niche specialization, such differences can be documented through direct or indirect observation of resource or habitat use. Here, we examined selective habitat use in alliance-forming male Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops aduncus, in Shark Bay, Western Australia. Using 6 years of sighting data (2001–2006), we calculated the home ranges of 17 male alliances (comprising 3–14 indivi...
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#1CHENFang (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 11
#2Meimei Zhang (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Last. C. Scott Watson (UA: University of Arizona)H-Index: 4
view all 7 authors...
Abstract. Climate change is intensifying glacier melting and lake development in High Mountain Asia (HMA), which could increase glacial lake outburst flood hazards and impact water resource and hydroelectric power management. However, quantification of variability in size and type of glacial lakes at high resolution has been incomplete in HMA. Here, we developed a HMA Glacial Lake Inventory (Hi-MAG) database to characterize the annual coverage of glacial lakes from 2008 to 2017 at 30 m resolutio...
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#1Bronte L. Moore (UWA: University of Western Australia)
#2Richard C. Connor (UMassD: University of Massachusetts Dartmouth)H-Index: 41
Last. Stephanie L. King (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 11
view all 5 authors...
Synchronous displays are hallmarks of many animal societies, ranging from the pulsing flashes of fireflies, to military marching in humans. Such displays are known to facilitate mate attraction or signal relationship quality. Across many taxa, synchronous male displays appear to be driven by competition, while synchronous displays in humans are thought to be unique in that they serve a cooperative function. Indeed, it is well established that human synchrony promotes cooperative endeavours and i...
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#2Richard C. ConnorH-Index: 5
Last. Stephanie L. KingH-Index: 11
view all 5 authors...
Synchronous displays are hallmarks of many animal societies, ranging from the pulsing flashes of fireflies, to military marching in humans. Such displays are known to facilitate mate attraction or signal relationship quality. Across many taxa, synchronous male displays appear to be driven by competition, while synchronous displays in humans are thought to be unique in that they serve a cooperative function. Indeed, it is well established that human synchrony promotes cooperative endeavours and i...
Source
#2Richard C. ConnorH-Index: 5
Last. Stephanie L. KingH-Index: 11
view all 5 authors...
Source
#1Livia Gerber (UZH: University of Zurich)H-Index: 5
#2Richard C. Connor (UMassD: University of Massachusetts Dartmouth)H-Index: 41
Last. Michael Krützen (UZH: University of Zurich)H-Index: 34
view all 12 authors...
Male alliances are an intriguing phenomenon in the context of reproduction since, in most taxa, males compete over an indivisible resource, female fertilization. Adult male bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus) in Shark Bay, Western Australia, form long-term, multilevel alliances to sequester estrus females. These alliances are therefore critical to male reproductive success. Yet, the long-term processes leading to the formation of such complex social bonds are still poorly understood. To ident...
4 CitationsSource
#1Christian Huggel (UZH: University of Zurich)H-Index: 46
#2Simon J. Allen (University of Geneva)H-Index: 24
Last. Tobias Bolch (UZH: University of Zurich)H-Index: 44
view all 8 authors...
Climate change has enormous impacts on the cryosphere In the Indian Himalayan Region (IHR) which have been increasingly documented over the past years. The effects of cryosphere change on people, ecosystems and economic sectors is less clear but bears important risks. Adaptation to changing conditions and risks is a priority for the region. Here we draw on experiences of Indo-Swiss collaborations in the field of climate change, cryosphere, risks and adaptation in the IHR. First, we provide a syn...
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#1Rebecca A. Hamilton (UMassD: University of Massachusetts Dartmouth)H-Index: 1
#2Teresa Borcuch (UMassD: University of Massachusetts Dartmouth)H-Index: 1
Last. Richard C. Connor (UMassD: University of Massachusetts Dartmouth)H-Index: 41
view all 7 authors...
Coalitions and alliances exemplify the core elements of conflict and cooperation in animal societies. Ecological influences on alliance formation are more readily attributed to within-species variation where phylogenetic signals are muted. Remarkably, male Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins in Shark Bay, Western Australia, exhibit systematic spatial variation in alliance behavior, not simply within a species or population, but within a single social network. Moving SE-NW along Peron Peninsula in S...
2 CitationsSource
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