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Susan Goodwin
University of Sydney
Public sectorPolitical scienceSocial policyPedagogySocial science
34Publications
9H-index
262Citations
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Publications 33
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#1Susan Goodwin (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 9
#2Helen Proctor (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 4
This chapter explores the ambiguities and tensions inherent in social justice discourses and social justice practices in higher education. Starting from the idea that we work from where we are (Bell, Higher Education Research and Development 36, 16–20, 2017), the chapter positions the book as coming from a ‘settler colonial space’ and engaging with established and emerging conceptions of social justice in ‘neoliberal times’. The authors argue that it is in this context that ontological, epistemo...
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#1Kelly Freebody (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 4
#2Susan Goodwin (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 9
A key aim of the research project reported on in this volume was to broadly explore texts related to applied theatre and map the intentions, values, understanding of success and references to change. In exploring the recruitment of these themes in 139 documents related to applied theatre, there emerged a repetition of key discourses – social justice, community, education, and participation. The repetition suggests orthodoxy in certain ways of thinking about applied theatre. It is clear that cont...
2 CitationsSource
#1Susan GoodwinH-Index: 9
Last. Ranjit VoolaH-Index: 12
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Program success of anti-poverty programs is increasingly being measured by randomised control trials (RCT), which primarily track financial and economic indicators. However, such assessments tend to overlook analyses of social structures, relationships and norms detrimental to the life of program participants. We contend that evaluations that capture participants' own representations of transformation provide alternative indicators of program success, complementing rather than competing with RCT...
#1Jan FookH-Index: 1
#2Susan GoodwinH-Index: 9
2 CitationsSource
#1Kelly FreebodyH-Index: 4
#2Susan GoodwinH-Index: 9
2 CitationsSource
#1Carol BacchiH-Index: 26
Last. Susan GoodwinH-Index: 9
view all 2 authors...
40 Citations
#1Carol Bacchi (University of Adelaide)H-Index: 26
#2Susan Goodwin (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 9
This chapter offers an analytic strategy, or “tool”, called “What’s the Problem Represented to be?” (the WPR approach), to facilitate poststructural policy analysis. It elaborates a poststructural understanding of politics as strategic relations and practices, and of theorizing as political practice. The WPR approach is introduced as a means to engage in such theorizing and to assist in the analytic task of making politics visible. To this end it offers seven interrelated forms of questioning an...
1 CitationsSource
#1Carol Bacchi (University of Adelaide)H-Index: 26
#2Susan Goodwin (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 9
The challenge in this chapter is to rethink commonly assumed geographical “entities” or “places”. Such “entities” play a pivotal role in how governing takes place and are most often treated by policy makers as taken-for-granted physical sites or locations. The chapter shows how poststructural policy analysis, illustrated in applications of WPR, encourages policy workers/analysts to consider “places” as political creations. Specifically, it illustrates how, through the lens of problematization an...
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#1Carol Bacchi (University of Adelaide)H-Index: 26
#2Susan Goodwin (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 9
Through applications of the WPR approach from several policy fields, this chapter explores the proposition that policies produce “objects”. It draws upon theory introduced in Chapter 3, with emphasis upon the notions of discursive practice, genealogy, and governmentality. The following questions guide the analysis: What does it mean to problematize an assumed “object for thought”? How are “objects” constituted through governing practices? What role do expert knowledges play in constituting “obje...
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#1Carol Bacchi (University of Adelaide)H-Index: 26
#2Susan Goodwin (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 9
This chapter draws on applications of the WPR approach to illustrate the usefulness of reflecting on how policies produce “subjects” through problematization. The argument is made that it is both relevant and important, in terms of policy development, to reflect on the ways in which policies constitute “subjects” as particular kinds of subjects, with possible impact on people’s sense of self and behaviors. The chapter shows that, through identifying the “people categories” and the subject positi...
2 CitationsSource
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