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David J. Keene
University of Oxford
Randomized controlled trialPhysical therapyAnkleRehabilitationMedicine
37Publications
7H-index
188Citations
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Publications 42
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#1David J. Keene (University of Oxford)H-Index: 7
#2Hessam Soutakbar (University of Oxford)H-Index: 1
Last. Sarah E Lamb (University of Oxford)H-Index: 49
view all 11 authors...
ABSTRACT Objectives The Getting it Right: Addressing Shoulder Pain (GRASP) trial is a large-scale, multicentre, 2 × 2 factorial randomised controlled trial investigating clinical and cost-effectiveness of a progressive exercise programme versus best-practice advice, with or without corticosteroid injection, for treating people with rotator cuff disorders. Here we describe the development, implementation and details of the physiotherapy-led interventions. Methods Medical Research Council guidance...
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#1J Alsousou (University of Liverpool)H-Index: 8
#2David J. Keene (John Radcliffe Hospital)H-Index: 7
Last. K Willett (John Radcliffe Hospital)H-Index: 18
view all 13 authors...
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#1David J. Keene (John Radcliffe Hospital)H-Index: 7
#2K. Willett (John Radcliffe Hospital)H-Index: 17
Last. K Willett (John Radcliffe Hospital)H-Index: 18
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The Ankle Injury Management (AIM) trial was a pragmatic equivalence randomized controlled trial conducted at 24 hospitals in the United Kingdom that recruited 620 patients aged more than 60 years w...
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#1David J. Keene (University of Oxford)H-Index: 7
#2J Alsousou (University of Liverpool)H-Index: 8
Last. K. Willett (University of Oxford)H-Index: 17
view all 12 authors...
Abstract Objective To determine whether an injection of platelet rich plasma improves outcomes after acute Achilles tendon rupture. Design Randomised, placebo controlled, two arm, parallel group, participant and assessor masked, superiority trial. Setting Secondary care trauma units across 19 hospitals in the United Kingdom’s health service. Participants Recruitment commenced in July 2015 and follow-up was completed in March 2018. 230 adults aged 18 years and over were included, with acute Achil...
6 CitationsSource
#1David J. KeeneH-Index: 7
#2Matthew L. CostaH-Index: 32
Last. Sallie LambH-Index: 11
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Introduction Ankle fractures result in significant morbidity in adults, with prognosis worsening with increasing age. Previous trials have not found evidence supporting supervised physiotherapy sessions, but these studies have not focused on older adults or tailored the exercise interventions to the complex needs of this patient group. The Ankle Fracture Treatment: Enhancing Rehabilitation study is a pilot randomised controlled trial to assess feasibility of a later definitive trial comparing be...
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#1J AlsousouH-Index: 8
#2David J. KeeneH-Index: 7
Last. Heather M O’ConnorH-Index: 1
view all 13 authors...
#1David J. Keene (University of Oxford)H-Index: 7
#2Karan Vadher (University of Oxford)H-Index: 2
Last. Sarah E Lamb (University of Oxford)H-Index: 49
view all 7 authors...
Objective To predict functional outcomes 6 months after ankle fracture in people aged ≥60 years using post-treatment and 6-week follow-up data to inform anticipated recovery, and identify people who may benefit from additional monitoring or rehabilitation. Design Prognostic model development and internal validation. Setting 24 National Health Service hospitals, UK. Methods Participants were the Ankle Injury Management clinical trial cohort (n=618) (ISRCTN04180738), aged 60–96 years, 459/618 (74%...
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#1David J. Keene (University of Oxford)H-Index: 7
#2J Alsousou (University of Oxford)H-Index: 8
Last. K. Willett (University of Oxford)H-Index: 17
view all 9 authors...
Aim Slow recovery and disability after Achilles tendon rupture are major challenges. Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) is an autologous supraphysiological concentration of platelets from whole blood that has demonstrated positive cellular and physiological effects on healing in the laboratory and is widely used in musculoskeletal treatments. However, evidence from adequately powered, robust clinical trials is lacking. We aimed to determine the clinical efficacy of PRP for treatment of acute Achilles te...
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#1J AlsousouH-Index: 8
#2David J. KeeneH-Index: 7
Last. Susan DuttonH-Index: 23
view all 12 authors...
#1David J. Keene (University of Oxford)H-Index: 7
#2J Alsousou (University of Liverpool)H-Index: 8
Last. K. Willett (University of Oxford)H-Index: 17
view all 12 authors...
Introduction Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP), an autologous supraphysiological concentration of platelets from whole blood, has demonstrated positive cellular and physiological effects on healing in the laboratory. However, evidence from robust clinical trials is lacking. We aimed to determine the clinical efficacy of PRP for treating acute Achilles tendon rupture. Materials and methods 230 adults starting non-surgical management within 12 days of rupture were randomised to PRP injection or dry needl...
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