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Kenneth W. Potter
University of Wisconsin-Madison
GeologyHydrologyEnvironmental scienceSurface runoffFlood myth
59Publications
18H-index
1,213Citations
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Publications 61
Newest
#1Kenneth W. Potter (UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)H-Index: 18
#2T Matthew Boyington (TVA: Tennessee Valley Authority)H-Index: 1
Source
#1Nicholas G. Hayden (UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)H-Index: 2
#2Kenneth W. Potter (UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)H-Index: 18
Last. David S. Liebl (UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)H-Index: 1
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1 CitationsSource
#1Kenneth W. Potter (UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)H-Index: 18
2 CitationsSource
#1Kenneth W. Potter (UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)H-Index: 18
#2Jamie C. Douglas (UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)H-Index: 1
Last. Edmund M. Brick (UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)H-Index: 1
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Agricultural development of the United States profoundly altered hydrologic processes, resulting in severe degradation of aquatic ecosystems. The conversion of natural landscapes to agricultural lands increased the peak and volume of surface runoff, causing massive soil erosion, stream channel enlargement, and introduction of enormous quantities of fine-grained sediment to lakes, streams, floodplains, and wetlands. During the years following the creation of the U.S. Soil Conservation Service in ...
6 CitationsSource
#1Zachary Schuster (UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)H-Index: 1
#2Kenneth W. Potter (UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)H-Index: 18
Last. David S. Liebl (UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)H-Index: 1
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AbstractStudies on the effects of anthropogenic climate change have found that the magnitude and frequency of intense precipitation events are expected to increase over the next century for the midwestern United States. The goal of this study was to use statistically downscaled and debiased precipitation projections for the state of Wisconsin derived from 14 general circulation models (GCMs) to assess the projected precipitation changes for the mid–21st century in a way that is relevant to water...
5 CitationsSource
#1William J. GutowskiH-Index: 32
#2G. M. HornbergerH-Index: 1
Last. ZHENGChun-miaoH-Index: 38
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29 Citations
#2Kenneth W. Potter (UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)H-Index: 18
Source
#1Justin S. Rogers (UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)H-Index: 8
#2Kenneth W. Potter (UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)H-Index: 18
Last. David E. Armstrong (UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)H-Index: 36
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: In 2006, we collected flow, sediment, and phosphorus (P) data at stream locations upstream and downstream of a small degraded wetland in south-central Wisconsin traversed by a stream draining a predominantly agricultural watershed. The amount of sediment that left the wetland in the two largest storms, which accounted for 96% of the exported sediment during the observation period, was twice the amount that entered the wetland, even though only 50% of the wetland had been inundated. This appare...
6 CitationsSource
#1Kenneth W. PotterH-Index: 18
#2Justin S. RogersH-Index: 8
Last. David E. ArmstrongH-Index: 36
view all 6 authors...
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