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Adriana Vergés
University of New South Wales
EcologySeagrassFisheryReefBiology
60Publications
22H-index
1,808Citations
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Publications 65
Newest
#1Melinda A. Coleman (SCU: Southern Cross University)
#2Georgina Wood (UNSW: University of New South Wales)
Last. Thomas Wernberg (RU: Roskilde University)H-Index: 45
view all 9 authors...
Global habitat deterioration of marine ecosystems has led to a need for active interventions to halt or reverse the loss of ecological function. Restoration has historically been a key tool to reverse habitat loss and restore functions, but the extent to which this will be sufficient under future climates is uncertain. Emerging genetic technologies now provide the ability for restoration to proactively match adaptability of target species to predicted future environmental conditions, which opens...
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#1Cayne Layton (UTAS: University of Tasmania)H-Index: 3
#2Melinda A. Coleman (SCU: Southern Cross University)H-Index: 23
Last. Craig R. Johnson (UTAS: University of Tasmania)H-Index: 46
view all 8 authors...
Kelp forests dominate the rocky coasts of temperate Australia and are the foundation of the Great Southern Reef. Much like terrestrial forests, these marine forests create complex habitat for diverse communities of flora and fauna. Kelp forests also support coastal food-webs and valuable fisheries and provide a suite of additional ecosystem services. In many regions of Australia and around the world, kelp forests are in decline due to ocean warming, overgrazing, and pollution. One potential tool...
2 CitationsSource
#1T Miranda (UNSW: University of New South Wales)
#2James A. Smith (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 15
Last. Adriana Vergés (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 22
view all 8 authors...
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#1Lara Parata (UNSW: University of New South Wales)
#2Shaun Nielsen (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 16
Last. Adriana Vergés (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 22
view all 6 authors...
Herbivorous fishes play important ecological roles in coral reefs by consuming algae that can otherwise outcompete corals, but we know little about the gut microbiota that facilitates this process. This study focussed on the gut microbiota of an ecologically important coral reef fish, the convict surgeonfish Acanthurus triostegus. We sought to understand how the microbiome of this species varies along its gastrointestinal tract and how it varies between juvenile and adult fish. Further, we exami...
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#1Melodie A. McGeoch (Monash University, Clayton campus)H-Index: 43
#2Guillaume Latombe (Monash University, Clayton campus)H-Index: 10
Last. Cang Hui (Stellenbosch University)H-Index: 31
view all 14 authors...
2 CitationsSource
#1Sean D. ConnellH-Index: 51
#2Adriana VergésH-Index: 22
Last. Melinda A. ColemanH-Index: 23
view all 7 authors...
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#1Adriana Vergés (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 22
#2Thomas WernbergH-Index: 45
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#1G Wood (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 1
Last. Adriana Vergés (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 22
view all 10 authors...
Anthropogenic activities have caused profound changes globally in biodiversity, species interactions and ecosystem functions and services. In terrestrial systems, restoration has emerged as a useful approach to mitigate these changes, and is increasingly recognised as a tool to fortify ecosystems against future disturbances. In marine systems, restoration is also gaining traction as a management tool, but it is still comparatively scant and underdeveloped relative to terrestrial environments. Ke...
1 CitationsSource
#1Adriana Vergés (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 22
#2Erin McCosker (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 1
Last. Peter D. Steinberg (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 64
view all 7 authors...
5 CitationsSource
#1Nadia S. Santini (UNAM: National Autonomous University of Mexico)H-Index: 11
#2Catherine E. Lovelock (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 49
Last. Adriana Vergés (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 22
view all 15 authors...
Saltmarshes provide many valuable ecosystem services including storage of a large amount of ‘blue carbon’ within their soils. To date, up to 50% of the world’s saltmarshes have been lost or severely degraded primarily due to a variety of anthropogenic pressures. Previous efforts have aimed to restore saltmarshes and their ecosystem functions, but the success of these efforts is rarely evaluated. To fill this gap, we used a range of metrics, including organic carbon stocks, root production, soil ...
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