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Ricardo Pérez-de la Fuente
University of Oxford
CretaceousPaleontologyNeuropteraBiologyZoology
29Publications
10H-index
307Citations
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Publications 31
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#1Ricardo Pérez-de la Fuente (University of Oxford)H-Index: 10
#2Michael S. Engel (AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 37
Last. Enrique Peñalver (Instituto Geológico y Minero de España)H-Index: 18
view all 4 authors...
Abstract Three larval neuropterans (Insecta: Neuropterida) with straight mandibulomaxillary stylets are described from Lower Cretaceous (late Albian, ~105 Ma) Spanish amber: a third-instar beaded lacewing (Berothidae) from the Penacerrada I locality (Burgos, Spain), and two specimens from the San Just locality (Teruel, Spain), i.e., a tentative first-instar beaded lacewing and a remarkable specimen considered a berothid-like mantispoid or dilaroid (instar unknown) displaying a combination of pot...
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#1Ricardo Pérez-de la Fuente (University of Oxford)H-Index: 10
#2Enrique Peñalver (Instituto Geológico y Minero de España)H-Index: 18
Multiple predatory insect lineages have developed a raptorial lifestyle by which they strike and hold prey using modified forelegs armed with spine-like structures and other integumentary specialisations. However, how structures enabling the raptorial function evolved in insects remains largely hypothetical or inferred through phylogeny due to the rarity of meaningful fossils. This is particularly true for mantidflies (Neuroptera: Mantispidae), which have a scarce fossil record mostly based on r...
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#1Ricardo Pérez-de la Fuente (University of Oxford)H-Index: 10
#2Michael S. Engel (AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 37
Last. Enrique Peñalver (Instituto Geológico y Minero de España)H-Index: 18
view all 4 authors...
3 CitationsSource
1 CitationsSource
#1Ricardo Pérez-de la Fuente (University of Oxford)H-Index: 10
#2Enrique Peñalver (Instituto Geológico y Minero de España)H-Index: 18
Last. Michael S. Engel (AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 37
view all 4 authors...
Diverse organisms protect and camouflage themselves using varied materials from their environment. This adaptation and associated behaviours (debris-carrying) are well known in modern green lacewing larvae (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae), mostly due to the widespread use of these immature insects in pest control. However, the evolutionary history of this successful strategy and related morphological adaptations in the lineage are still far from being understood. Here we describe a novel green lacewing...
7 CitationsSource
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#1Enrique Peñalver (Instituto Geológico y Minero de España)H-Index: 18
#2Antonio Arillo (Complutense University of Madrid)H-Index: 16
Last. Ricardo Pérez-de la Fuente (University of Oxford)H-Index: 10
view all 8 authors...
The originally published version of this Article was updated shortly after publication to add the word ‘Ticks’ to the title, following its inadvertent removal during the production process. This has now been corrected in both the PDF and HTML versions of the Article.
1 CitationsSource
#2Antonio ArilloH-Index: 16
view all 3 authors...
#1Enrique Peñalver (Instituto Geológico y Minero de España)H-Index: 18
#2Antonio Arillo (Complutense University of Madrid)H-Index: 16
Last. Ricardo Pérez-de la Fuente (University of Oxford)H-Index: 10
view all 8 authors...
Ticks are currently among the most prevalent blood-feeding ectoparasites, but their feeding habits and hosts in deep time have long remained speculative. Here, we report direct and indirect evidence in 99 million-year-old Cretaceous amber showing that hard ticks and ticks of the extinct new family Deinocrotonidae fed on blood from feathered dinosaurs, non-avialan or avialan excluding crown-group birds. A †Cornupalpatum burmanicum hard tick is entangled in a pennaceous feather. Two deinocrotonids...
20 CitationsSource
#1David Peris (James I University)H-Index: 9
#2Conrad C. Labandeira (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 44
Last. Ricardo Pérez-de la Fuente (Harvard University)H-Index: 10
view all 6 authors...
ABSTRACTAbundant gymnosperm pollen grains associated with the oedemerid beetle Darwinylus marcosi Peris, 2016 were found in Early Cretaceous amber from Spain. This discovery provides confirmatory evidence for a pollination mutualism during the mid Mesozoic for the family Oedemeridae (Coleoptera), which today is known to pollinate only angiosperms. As a result, this new record documents a lateral host-plant transfer from an earlier gymnosperm to a later angiosperm, indicating that pollination of ...
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