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Ricardo Pérez-de la Fuente
University of Oxford
26Publications
10H-index
266Citations
Publications 26
Newest
Published on Dec 20, 2018in Palaeontology 3.73
Ricardo Pérez-de la Fuente10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Oxford),
Michael S. Engel36
Estimated H-index: 36
(American Museum of Natural History)
+ 1 AuthorsEnrique Peñalver17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Instituto Geológico y Minero de España)
Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2018in Nature Communications 12.35
Enrique Peñalver17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Instituto Geológico y Minero de España),
Antonio Arillo15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Complutense University of Madrid)
+ 5 AuthorsRicardo Pérez-de la Fuente10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Oxford)
The originally published version of this Article was updated shortly after publication to add the word ‘Ticks’ to the title, following its inadvertent removal during the production process. This has now been corrected in both the PDF and HTML versions of the Article.
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Published on Dec 1, 2018in Scientific Reports 4.12
Ricardo Pérez-de la Fuente10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Oxford),
Enrique Peñalver17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Instituto Geológico y Minero de España)
+ 1 AuthorsMichael S. Engel36
Estimated H-index: 36
(American Museum of Natural History)
Diverse organisms protect and camouflage themselves using varied materials from their environment. This adaptation and associated behaviours (debris-carrying) are well known in modern green lacewing larvae (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae), mostly due to the widespread use of these immature insects in pest control. However, the evolutionary history of this successful strategy and related morphological adaptations in the lineage are still far from being understood. Here we describe a novel green lacewing...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 13, 2018in ZooKeys 1.08
Ricardo Pérez-de la Fuente10
Estimated H-index: 10
,
Christel Hoffeins , Jindřich Roháček1
Estimated H-index: 1
Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2017in Nature Communications 12.35
Enrique Peñalver17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Instituto Geológico y Minero de España),
Antonio Arillo15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Complutense University of Madrid)
+ 5 AuthorsRicardo Pérez-de la Fuente10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Oxford)
Ticks are currently among the most prevalent blood-feeding ectoparasites, but their feeding habits and hosts in deep time have long remained speculative. Here, we report direct and indirect evidence in 99 million-year-old Cretaceous amber showing that hard ticks and ticks of the extinct new family Deinocrotonidae fed on blood from feathered dinosaurs, non-avialan or avialan excluding crown-group birds. A †Cornupalpatum burmanicum hard tick is entangled in a pennaceous feather. Two deinocrotonids...
16 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 4, 2017in Communicative & Integrative Biology
David Peris9
Estimated H-index: 9
(James I University),
Conrad C. Labandeira44
Estimated H-index: 44
(University of Maryland, College Park)
+ 3 AuthorsRicardo Pérez-de la Fuente10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Harvard University)
ABSTRACTAbundant gymnosperm pollen grains associated with the oedemerid beetle Darwinylus marcosi Peris, 2016 were found in Early Cretaceous amber from Spain. This discovery provides confirmatory evidence for a pollination mutualism during the mid Mesozoic for the family Oedemeridae (Coleoptera), which today is known to pollinate only angiosperms. As a result, this new record documents a lateral host-plant transfer from an earlier gymnosperm to a later angiosperm, indicating that pollination of ...
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Published on Mar 1, 2017in Current Biology 9.25
David Peris9
Estimated H-index: 9
(James I University),
Ricardo Pérez-de la Fuente10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Harvard University)
+ 3 AuthorsConrad C. Labandeira44
Estimated H-index: 44
(University of Maryland, College Park)
Summary During the mid-Cretaceous, angiosperms diversified from several nondiverse lineages to their current global domination [1], replacing earlier gymnosperm lineages [2]. Several hypotheses explain this extensive radiation [3], one of which involves proliferation of insect pollinator associations in the transition from gymnosperm to angiosperm dominance. However, most evidence supports gymnosperm–insect pollinator associations, buttressed by direct evidence of pollen on insect bodies, curren...
12 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 2016in Arthropod Structure & Development 1.70
Ricardo Pérez-de la Fuente10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Harvard University),
Xavier Delclòs18
Estimated H-index: 18
(University of Barcelona)
+ 1 AuthorsMichael S. Engel36
Estimated H-index: 36
(University of Kansas)
Abstract Amber holds special paleobiological significance due to its ability to preserve direct evidence of biotic interactions and animal behaviors for millions of years. Here we review the finding of Hallucinochrysa diogenesi Perez-de la Fuente, Delclos, Penalver and Engel, 2012, a morphologically atypical larva related to modern green lacewings (Insecta: Neuroptera) that was described in Early Cretaceous amber from the El Soplao outcrop (northern Spain). The fossil larva is preserved with a d...
8 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 3, 2015in Journal of Systematic Palaeontology 2.33
Alba Sánchez-García4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Barcelona),
Enrique Peñalver17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Instituto Geológico y Minero de España)
+ 1 AuthorsXavier Delclòs18
Estimated H-index: 18
(University of Barcelona)
The extinct tanaidomorphan diversity from Early Cretaceous Spanish amber, currently comprising 26 specimens, is reassessed. The fossil family Alavatanaidae Vonk & Schram, 2007, described from Spanish amber, is revised on account of new preparation of type specimens and the discovery of new material. The described tanaidomorphan taxa are classified within the superfamily Paratanaoidea. An emended diagnosis for Alavatanaidae is provided, as well as for the genera Alavatanais Vonk & Schram, 2007 an...
20 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 1, 2015in Current Biology 9.25
Enrique Peñalver17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Instituto Geológico y Minero de España),
Antonio Arillo15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Complutense University of Madrid)
+ 4 AuthorsDavid A. Grimaldi40
Estimated H-index: 40
(American Museum of Natural History)
Summary The great evolutionary success of angiosperms has traditionally been explained, in part, by the partnership of these plants with insect pollinators [1–6]. The main approach to understanding the origins of this pervasive relationship has been study of the pollinators of living cycads, gnetaleans, and basal angiosperms [7]. Among the most morphologically specialized living pollinators are diverse, long-proboscid flies. Early such flies include the brachyceran family Zhangsolvidae, previous...
29 Citations Source Cite
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