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Maria J. Pozo
Spanish National Research Council
76Publications
34H-index
6,381Citations
Publications 76
Newest
Published on Jul 17, 2019in Plant Signaling & Behavior
Ainhoa Martínez-Medina10
Estimated H-index: 10
(CSIC: Spanish National Research Council),
Iván Fernández6
Estimated H-index: 6
(CSIC: Spanish National Research Council)
+ 2 AuthorsMaria J. Pozo34
Estimated H-index: 34
(CSIC: Spanish National Research Council)
Published on Jun 13, 2019in Journal of Experimental Botany5.36
Ainhoa Martínez-Medina10
Estimated H-index: 10
(CSIC: Spanish National Research Council),
Leyre Pescador-Azofra (CSIC: Spanish National Research Council)+ 2 AuthorsMaría C. Romero-Puertas35
Estimated H-index: 35
Published on May 8, 2019in New Phytologist7.30
Ainhoa Martínez-Medina10
Estimated H-index: 10
(CSIC: Spanish National Research Council),
Leyre Pescador (CSIC: Spanish National Research Council)+ 4 AuthorsMaria J. Pozo34
Estimated H-index: 34
(CSIC: Spanish National Research Council)
Published on Apr 13, 2019in New Phytologist7.30
Iván Fernández3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UU: Utrecht University),
Iván Fernández (UU: Utrecht University)+ 6 AuthorsCorné M. J. Pieterse68
Estimated H-index: 68
(UU: Utrecht University)
Published on Dec 1, 2018in New Phytologist7.30
Javier Rivero2
Estimated H-index: 2
(CSIC: Spanish National Research Council),
Domingo Álvarez1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CSIC: Spanish National Research Council)
+ 2 AuthorsMaria J. Pozo34
Estimated H-index: 34
(CSIC: Spanish National Research Council)
Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbioses can improve plant tolerance to multiple stresses. We compared three AM fungi (AMF) from different genera, one of them isolated from a dry and saline environment, in terms of their ability to increase tomato tolerance to moderate or severe drought or salt stress. Plant physiological parameters and metabolic profiles were compared in order to find the molecular mechanisms underlying plant protection against stress. Mycorrhizal growth response was determined, a...
Published on Dec 1, 2018in Plant Methods3.17
Victoria Pastor14
Estimated H-index: 14
(James I University),
Paloma Sánchez-Bel16
Estimated H-index: 16
(James I University)
+ 2 AuthorsVictor Flors35
Estimated H-index: 35
(James I University)
Systemin has been extensively studied since it was discovered and is described as a peptidic hormone in tomato plants and other Solanaceae. Jasmonic acid and systemin are proposed to act through a positive feed-back loop with jasmonic acid, playing synergistic roles in response to both wounding and insect attack. Despite its biological relevance, most studies regarding the function of systemin in defence have been studied via PROSYSTEMIN (PROSYS) gene expression, which encodes the propeptide pro...
Published on Nov 1, 2018in Trends in Plant Science14.01
Olga Ferlian9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Leipzig University),
Arjen Biere35
Estimated H-index: 35
+ 14 AuthorsIna C. Meier13
Estimated H-index: 13
(GAU: University of Göttingen)
Research on mycorrhizal interactions has traditionally developed into separate disciplines addressing different organizational levels. This separation has led to an incomplete understanding of mycorrhizal functioning. Integration of mycorrhiza research at different scales is needed to understand the mechanisms underlying the context dependency of mycorrhizal associations, and to use mycorrhizae for solving environmental issues. Here, we provide a road map for the integration of mycorrhiza resear...
Published on Sep 19, 2018in Frontiers in Microbiology4.26
Paola Durán8
Estimated H-index: 8
(UFRO: University of La Frontera),
Gonzalo Tortella15
Estimated H-index: 15
(UFRO: University of La Frontera)
+ 4 AuthorsMaria J. Pozo34
Estimated H-index: 34
(CSIC: Spanish National Research Council)
Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici (Ggt) is the main soilborne factor that affects wheat production around the world. Recently we reported the occurrence of six suppressive soils in monoculture areas from indigenous “Mapuche” communities, and evidenced that the suppression relied on the biotic component of those soils. Here, we compare the rhizosphere and endosphere microbial community structure (total bacteria, actinomycetes, total fungi and ascomycetes) of wheat plants grown in suppressive a...
Published on Feb 1, 2018in Plant Cell and Environment5.62
Paloma Sánchez-Bel16
Estimated H-index: 16
(James I University),
N. Sanmartín1
Estimated H-index: 1
(James I University)
+ 6 AuthorsVictor Flors35
Estimated H-index: 35
(James I University)
We thank the Serveis Centrals of the Universitat Jaume I and particularly Cristian Barrera for their technical support. This work was financially supported by the Ministerio de Economia y Competitividad AGL2012‐39923 and AGL2015‐64990‐2R.
Published on Jan 1, 2018
Alison E. Bennett14
Estimated H-index: 14
(OSU: Ohio State University),
Peter Orrell1
Estimated H-index: 1
(James Hutton Institute)
+ 1 AuthorsMaria J. Pozo34
Estimated H-index: 34
(CSIC: Spanish National Research Council)
Our goal within this chapter is to review fungal-mediated above–belowground interactions in which belowground organisms influence aboveground organisms (or vice versa) primarily via a shared host plant, but to also highlight what we feel are the biggest areas for future research within this field: the community approach, stability, evolution, mechanisms, and application of these interactions. First, the community approach examines multiple simultaneously interacting species as communities, an ap...
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