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Tom H. Oliver
University of Reading
Climate changeEcologyButterflyPopulationBiology
81Publications
25H-index
2,136Citations
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Publications 96
Newest
Last. Manuela González-Suárez (University of Reading)H-Index: 13
view all 6 authors...
Japanese knotweed (Fallopia japonica) is a highly damaging invasive species affecting UK infrastructure and biodiversity. Under laboratory conditions, the psyllid Aphalara itadori has demonstrated its potential to be a successful biocontrol agent for F. japonica. However, this potential has not materialised in the field where long-term establishment of A. itadori has been unsuccessful and faces the added challenge of climate change. Intraspecific variation (variation among individuals of a speci...
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#1Luke C. Evans (University of Reading)H-Index: 1
#2Richard M. Sibly (University of Reading)H-Index: 55
Last. Richard J. Walters (University of Reading)H-Index: 10
view all 6 authors...
Dispersal is a key process affecting population persistence and major factors affecting dispersal rates are the amounts, connectedness and properties of habitats in landscapes. We present new data on the butterfly Maniola jurtina in flower-rich and flower-poor habitats that demonstrates how movement and behaviour differ between sexes and habitat types, and how this effects consequent dispersal rates. Females had higher flight speeds than males, but their total time in flight was four times less....
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#1Deepa SenapathiH-Index: 8
Last. Jenny A. HodgsonH-Index: 20
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In 2011, the government published Biodiversity 2020: A strategy for England’s wildlife and ecosystem services [1]. This strategy for England builds on the 2011 Natural Environment White Paper - NEWP [2] and provides a comprehensive picture of how we are implementing our international and EU commitments. It sets out the strategic direction for biodiversity policy between 2011-2020 on land (including rivers and lakes) and at sea, and forms part of the UK’s commitments under the ‘the Aichi targets’...
#1Vicki L. Senior (University of Sheffield)
#2Luke C. Evans (University of Reading)H-Index: 1
Last. Karl L. Evans (University of Sheffield)H-Index: 38
view all 5 authors...
Species interactions have a spatio‐temporal component driven by environmental cues, which if altered by climate change can drive shifts in community dynamics. There is insufficient understanding of the precise time‐windows during which inter‐annual variation in weather drives phenological shifts and the consequences for mismatches between interacting species and resultant population dynamics – particularly for insects. We use a 20‐year study on a tri‐trophic system: sycamore Acer pseudoplatanus,...
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#1Luke C. Evans (University of Reading)H-Index: 1
#2Richard M. Sibly (University of Reading)H-Index: 55
Last. Richard J. Walters (University of Reading)H-Index: 10
view all 6 authors...
1) Dispersal ability is key to species persistence in times of environmental change. Assessing a species’ vulnerability and response to anthropogenic changes is often performed using one of two methods: correlative approaches that infer dispersal potential based on traits, such as wingspan or an index of mobility derived from expert opinion, or a mechanistic modelling approach that extrapolates displacement rates from empirical data on short-term movements. 2) Here we compare and evaluate the su...
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#1Tom H. Oliver (Imperial College London)H-Index: 25
Last. Tanai CardonaH-Index: 13
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Oxygenic photosynthesis starts with the oxidation of water to O2. Cyanobacteria are the only known prokaryotes capable of oxygenic photosynthesis and therefore, it is assumed that water oxidation is a late innovation relative to the origin of life. However, when exactly oxygenic photosynthesis originated remains lively debated. Here we show that the origin of photosystem II, the water-splitting enzyme, occurred at an early stage during the evolution of life and long before the origin of Cyanobac...
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#1John W. RedheadH-Index: 16
#2Tom H. OliverH-Index: 25
view all 4 authors...
#1V. Pellissier (AU: Aarhus University)
#2Reto Schmucki (University of Paris)H-Index: 10
Last. Romain Julliard (University of Paris)H-Index: 39
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The European Union's Natura 2000 (N2000), is one of the largest international networks of protected areas. One of its aims is to secure the status of a pre-determined set of (targeted) bird and butterfly species. However, also non-target species may benefit from N2000. We evaluated how the terrestrial component of this network relates to the abundance of non-targeted, more common bird and butterfly species using data from long-term volunteer-based monitoring programs in 9,602 sites for birds and...
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#1Luke C. Evans (University of Reading)H-Index: 1
#2Richard M. Sibly (University of Reading)H-Index: 55
Last. Richard J. Walters (University of Reading)H-Index: 10
view all 6 authors...
Abstract The intensification of agricultural practices throughout the twentieth century has had large detrimental effects on biodiversity and these are likely to increase as the human population rises, with consequent pressure on land. To offset these negative impacts, agri-environment schemes have been widely implemented, offering financial incentives for land-owners to create or maintain favourable habitats that enhance or maintain biodiversity. While some evidence is available on the resultin...
1 CitationsSource
#1Philip J. Platts (Ebor: University of York)H-Index: 18
#2Suzanna C. Mason (Ebor: University of York)H-Index: 1
Last. Chris D. Thomas (Ebor: University of York)H-Index: 87
view all 8 authors...
Range shifting is vital for species persistence, but there is little consensus on why individual species vary so greatly in the rates at which their ranges have shifted in response to recent climate warming. Here, using 40 years of distribution data for 291 species from 13 invertebrate taxa in Britain, we show that interactions between habitat availability and exposure to climate change at the range margins explain up to half of the variation in rates of range shift. Habitat generalists expanded...
2 CitationsSource
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