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Huan Qiu
Rutgers University
43Publications
18H-index
1,052Citations
Publications 43
Newest
Published on Feb 22, 2019in Scientific Reports 4.01
Alexander Shumaker1
Estimated H-index: 1
(RU: Rutgers University),
Hollie M. Putnam24
Estimated H-index: 24
(URI: University of Rhode Island)
+ 7 AuthorsDebashish Bhattacharya64
Estimated H-index: 64
(RU: Rutgers University)
Corals comprise a biomineralizing cnidarian, dinoflagellate algal symbionts, and associated microbiome of prokaryotes and viruses. Ongoing efforts to conserve coral reefs by identifying the major stress response pathways and thereby laying the foundation to select resistant genotypes rely on a robust genomic foundation. Here we generated and analyzed a high quality long-read based ~886 Mbp nuclear genome assembly and transcriptome data from the dominant rice coral, Montipora capitata from Hawai’...
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Published on Dec 1, 2018in Scientific Reports 4.01
Ning Zhang24
Estimated H-index: 24
(RU: Rutgers University),
Guohong Cai13
Estimated H-index: 13
(USDA: United States Department of Agriculture)
+ 12 AuthorsJing Luo18
Estimated H-index: 18
(RU: Rutgers University)
The rice blast fungus Pyricularia oryzae (syn. Magnaporthe oryzae, Magnaporthe grisea), a member of the order Magnaporthales in the class Sordariomycetes, is an important plant pathogen and a model species for studying pathogen infection and plant-fungal interaction. In this study, we generated genome sequence data from five additional Magnaporthales fungi including non-pathogenic species, and performed comparative genome analysis of a total of 13 fungal species in the class Sordariomycetes to u...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2018in BMC Evolutionary Biology 3.04
Huan Qiu18
Estimated H-index: 18
(RU: Rutgers University),
Alessandro W. Rossoni2
Estimated H-index: 2
(HHU: University of Düsseldorf)
+ 2 AuthorsDebashish Bhattacharya64
Estimated H-index: 64
(RU: Rutgers University)
Background Genome reduction in intracellular pathogens and endosymbionts is usually compensated by reliance on the host for energy and nutrients. Free-living taxa with reduced genomes must however evolve strategies for generating functional diversity to support their independent lifestyles. An emerging model for the latter case is the Rhodophyta (red algae) that comprises an ecologically widely distributed, species-rich phylum. Red algae have undergone multiple phases of significant genome reduc...
3 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 2, 2018in Critical Reviews in Plant Sciences 4.19
Debashish Bhattacharya64
Estimated H-index: 64
(RU: Rutgers University),
Huan Qiu18
Estimated H-index: 18
(RU: Rutgers University)
+ 3 AuthorsDana C. Price19
Estimated H-index: 19
(RU: Rutgers University)
AbstractGenome evolution is usually viewed through the lens of growth in size and complexity over time, exemplified by plants and animals. In contrast, genome reduction is associated with a narrowing of ecological potential, such as in parasites and endosymbionts. But, can nuclear genome reduction also occur in, and potentially underpin a major radiation of free-living eukaryotes? An intriguing example of this phenomenon is provided by the red algae (Rhodophyta) that have lost many conserved pat...
5 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 2017in Genomics 3.16
Huan Qiu18
Estimated H-index: 18
(RU: Rutgers University),
Ehud Zelzion10
Estimated H-index: 10
(RU: Rutgers University)
+ 4 AuthorsDebashish Bhattacharya64
Estimated H-index: 64
(RU: Rutgers University)
Abstract Stony coral (Scleractinia) genomes are still poorly explored and many questions remain about their evolution and contribution to the success and longevity of reefs. We analyzed transcriptome and genome data from Montipora capitata , Acropora digitifera , and transcriptome data from 20 other coral species. To our surprise, we found highly conserved, anciently derived, Scleractinia COral-specific Repeat families (SCORs) that are abundant in all the studied lineages. SCORs form complex sec...
1 Citations Source Cite
Susan H. Brawley33
Estimated H-index: 33
(UMaine: University of Maine),
Nicolas A. Blouin12
Estimated H-index: 12
(UMaine: University of Maine)
+ 47 AuthorsCheong Xin Chan19
Estimated H-index: 19
(UQ: University of Queensland)
Porphyra umbilicalis (laver) belongs to an ancient group of red algae (Bangiophyceae), is harvested for human food, and thrives in the harsh conditions of the upper intertidal zone. Here we present the 87.7-Mbp haploid Porphyra genome (65.8% G + C content, 13,125 gene loci) and elucidate traits that inform our understanding of the biology of red algae as one of the few multicellular eukaryotic lineages. Novel features of the Porphyra genome shared by other red algae relate to the cytoskeleton, c...
32 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2017in Journal of Phycology 2.83
Huan Qiu18
Estimated H-index: 18
(RU: Rutgers University),
Jun Mo Lee3
Estimated H-index: 3
(SKKU: Sungkyunkwan University)
+ 1 AuthorsDebashish Bhattacharya64
Estimated H-index: 64
(RU: Rutgers University)
Red algae (Rhodophyta) putatively diverged from the eukaryote tree of life >1.2 billion years ago and are the source of plastids in the ecologically important diatoms, haptophytes, and dinoflagellates. In general, red algae contain the largest plastid gene inventory among all such organelles derived from primary, secondary, or additional rounds of endosymbiosis. In contrast, their nuclear gene inventory is reduced when compared to their putative sister lineage, the Viridiplantae, and other photo...
5 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 18, 2017in PeerJ 2.35
Hollie M. Putnam24
Estimated H-index: 24
(URI: University of Rhode Island),
Diane K. Adams11
Estimated H-index: 11
(RU: Rutgers University)
+ 6 AuthorsDebashish Bhattacharya64
Estimated H-index: 64
(RU: Rutgers University)
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2017in Journal of Phycology 2.83
Ravi S. Pandey2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UNT: University of North Texas),
Garima Saxena (UNT: University of North Texas)+ 2 AuthorsRajeev K. Azad15
Estimated H-index: 15
(UNT: University of North Texas)
Identification of horizontal gene transfers (HGTs) has primarily relied on phylogenetic tree based methods, which require a rich sampling of sequenced genomes to ensure a reliable inference. Because the success of phylogenetic approaches depends on the breadth and depth of the database, researchers usually apply stringent filters to detect only the most likely gene transfers in the genomes of interest. One such study focused on a highly conservative estimate of trans-domain gene transfers in the...
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Published on Dec 2, 2016in PLOS Currents
Huan Qiu18
Estimated H-index: 18
,
Hwan Su Yoon19
Estimated H-index: 19
(SKKU: Sungkyunkwan University),
Debashish Bhattacharya64
Estimated H-index: 64
7 Citations Source Cite
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