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Margaret S. Archer
University of Warwick
ReflexivitySociologySocial changeSocial scienceSocial theory
101Publications
24H-index
8,798Citations
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Publications 128
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#1Margaret S. Archer (Warw.: University of Warwick)H-Index: 24
#2Jamie Morgan (LBU: Leeds Beckett University)H-Index: 11
ABSTRACTIn this wide-ranging interview Professor Margaret Archer discusses a variety of aspects of her work, academic career and influences, beginning with the role the study of education systems p...
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#1Margaret S. Archer (Warw.: University of Warwick)H-Index: 24
Critical Realism, the philosophy of the social sciences used here is equally applicable to all such disciplines and accords no special place to economics. In fact there has been disappointingly little take-up of it by heterodox economists (notable exceptions in Britain being Tony Lawson and Jamie Morgan). The generality with which Roy Bhaskar advanced CR means that necessarily theorists in each discipline must develop their own explanations, although these will share the same philosophical ‘unde...
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#1Margaret S. Archer (Warw.: University of Warwick)H-Index: 24
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#1Margaret S. Archer (Warw.: University of Warwick)H-Index: 24
ABSTRACTThe role of Concrete Utopias in the works of Roy Bhaskar are contrasted with the ‘Real Utopias’ of Erik Olin Wright. Critical Realism treats them as ‘possibilities’ that are real because re...
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#1Margaret S. Archer (Warw.: University of Warwick)H-Index: 24
Ontogenetically every newborn human has to establish satisfactory and sustainable relations with the three orders of natural reality: Nature, the Practical Order and the Social Order if they are to survive and thrive. Each order has changed greatly since c. 1980 and exacerbates our liabilities: Climate Change threatens humanity with finitude, the Imperative for Growth with commodification, and the expressivism encouraged by the digital surfeit discourages subjects’ commitment to enduring concern...
4 CitationsSource
#1Margaret S. ArcherH-Index: 24
4 CitationsSource
#1Margaret S. Archer (Warw.: University of Warwick)H-Index: 24
This is the last of five books in the series on ‘Social Morphogenesis’. Contributors explore whether or not Late Modernity is transforming into a Morphogenic social formation and, insofar as morphogenetic processes are intensifying, do these promote or diminish human well-being (Eudaimonia). After summarizing the four main characteristics of a Morphogenic Society, as discussed in previous volumes, we ask what needs to be the case for it to foster the human flourishing of all and the Common Good....
3 CitationsSource
#1Margaret S. Archer (Warw.: University of Warwick)H-Index: 24
This contribution analyses the Sustainable Development Goals (United Nations Transforming Our World. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development 2015) and their relation to education. In a first part, the conception of education, underlying the UN vision, is criticized, since education must be considered as a structured social institution, where the structure greatly influences the whole education process. The second part analyses the positive role of numerous institutions, not directly aiming a...
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#1Margaret S. Archer (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 24
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#1Margaret S. Archer (Warw.: University of Warwick)H-Index: 24
Does intense social change (morphogenesis) and the lack of a stable social context spell a crisis for both normative consensus and legal regulation of the social order? In other words, does the valid and effective rule of law depend upon morphostasis in society? Traditionally, normativity, social integration and legal regulation were held to be mutually reinforcing, but this mutual support has weakened greatly over the last three decades as morphogenesis has increased and morphostasis declined. ...
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