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Ariane Stratmann
University of Bern
FlockAnimal scienceLayingBiologyKeel
13Publications
5H-index
119Citations
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Publications 13
Newest
#1Sabine G. Gebhardt-Henrich (University of Bern)H-Index: 14
#2Christina Barbara Rufener (University of Bern)H-Index: 3
Last. Ariane Stratmann (University of Bern)H-Index: 5
view all 3 authors...
ABSTRACT Assessing keel bone damage reliably and accurately is a requirement for all research on this topic. Most commonly, assessment is done on live birds by palpation and is therefore prone to bias. A 2-day Training School of the COST Action “Identifying causes and solutions of keel bone damage in laying hens” with 16 participants of variable experience was held where palpation of live hens was followed by consulting corresponding radiographic images of keel bones. We hypothesized that the in...
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#1Christina Rufener (UC Davis: University of California, Davis)
Last. Michael J. Toscano (University of Bern)H-Index: 18
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Abstract Keel bone fractures (KBF) in laying hens have been shown to cause pain and impair mobility under experimental conditions. However, it is not known how KBF relates to the mobility of individual hens housed in aviary systems. For the current study, 120 focal hens (60 Lohmann Brown (LB) and 60 Lohmann Selected Leghorn (LSL)) were kept in six identical pens equipped with a commercially relevant aviary system (20 LSL focal hens + 205 LB or 20 LB focal hens + 205 LSL per pen, respectively). D...
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#1Ariane StratmannH-Index: 5
#2Selina Mühlemann (University of Bern)H-Index: 1
Last. Nadine RinggenbergH-Index: 3
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Abstract Even though aviary systems provide a range of benefits for laying hens in terms of animal welfare, falls and collisions have been observed in experimental settings. These falls are likely stressful for the birds and are thought to be linked to the known high prevalence of keel bone fractures in aviary-housed hens. We investigated the frequency of falls and fall patterns such as collisions, height and cause of fall as well as the prevalence of keel bone damage in commercial aviary-housed...
1 CitationsSource
#1Ana Katinka Rentsch (University of Bern)
#2Christina Barbara Rufener (University of Bern)H-Index: 3
Last. Michael J. Toscano (University of Bern)H-Index: 18
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Abstract Keel bone fractures (KBF) in laying hens pose a severe problem for animal welfare as they are likely to be associated with pain and suffering. Furthermore, they are suspected to hinder or restrict hens in their performance of natural species-specific behaviour. The aim of this study was to determine whether KBF affect laying hen behaviour in a non-cage system and whether this alteration is caused by pain. Forty Brown Nick and 40 Nick Chick hens were individually marked, and video record...
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#1Christina Barbara Rufener (University of Bern)H-Index: 3
#2Sarah Dorothea Baur (University of Bern)H-Index: 2
Last. Michael J. Toscano (University of Bern)H-Index: 18
view all 4 authors...
The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of keel bone fracture (KBF) severity and healing activity on individual productivity of laying hens. Focal hens (75 Lohmann Selected Leghorn (LSL), 75 Lohmann Brown (LB)) were housed alongside non-focal hens in 10 identical pens containing a commercial aviary system (15 focal hens per pen). Eggs of focal hens were identified by orally administering a dye on 3 consecutive days, resulting in a hen-specific color pattern in the yolk. Eggs were col...
2 CitationsSource
#1Christina Barbara Rufener (University of Bern)H-Index: 3
#2Sarah Dorothea Baur (University of Bern)H-Index: 2
Last. Michael J. Toscano (University of Bern)H-Index: 18
view all 4 authors...
Up to 97 % of laying hens housed in aviary systems are affected by keel bone fractures. Due to the scope of the problem, multiple efforts investigating causes and consequences of fractures have been conducted. The most frequently used techniques to detect fractures lack accuracy and provide only vague information (palpation) or cannot be conducted longitudinally (dissection). Radiographic imaging overcomes these weaknesses as it allows longitudinal observations and provides detailed information ...
3 CitationsSource
#1Janja Sirovnik (University of Bern)H-Index: 2
#2Ariane Stratmann (University of Bern)H-Index: 5
Last. Michael J. Toscano (University of Bern)H-Index: 18
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Abstract Some commercial aviary systems for laying hens allow birds to access feed by standing on perches instead of platforms. Despite reports that providing laying hens with perches relates to reduced aggression and cannibalism, and increased prevalence of keel bone damage, the impact of feeding from perches on behaviour, health, and production has not been investigated. The current work studied the effects of feeding either from perches (Perch Treatment) or platforms (Platform Treatment) on b...
2 CitationsSource
#1Laura Candelotto (University of Bern)H-Index: 1
#2Ariane Stratmann (University of Bern)H-Index: 5
Last. Michael J. Toscano (University of Bern)H-Index: 18
view all 6 authors...
Keel bone fractures are a well-known welfare problem in modern commercial laying hen systems. The present study sought to identify genetic variation in relation to keel bone fracture susceptibility of 4 distinct crossbred and one pure line, and by extension, possible breeding traits. Susceptibility to fractures were assessed using an ex vivo impact testing protocol in combination with a study design that min- imized environmental variation to focus on genetic differences. The 5 crossbred/pure li...
6 CitationsSource
#1Sabine G. Gebhardt-Henrich (University of Bern)H-Index: 14
#2Ariane Stratmann (University of Bern)H-Index: 5
LAYING hens crowding in corners or other places in the barn or veranda, ‘piling up’, can lead to the birds smothering each other. This is a well-known but unpredictable event causing losses to producers and negatively affecting animal welfare. The cause and the process of this phenomenon are hard to explain as detection is normally after the incident when a few to several hundred dead laying hens are found. As highlighted in a paper summarised on p 252 of this issue of Veterinary Record by Rayne...
1 CitationsSource
#1Ariane Stratmann (University of Bern)H-Index: 5
Last. Michael J. Toscano (University of Bern)H-Index: 18
view all 6 authors...
The prevalence of keel bone damage as well as external egg parameters of 2 pure lines divergently selected for high (H) and low (L) bone strength were investigated in 2 aviary systems under commercial conditions. A standard LSL hybrid was used as a reference group. Birds were kept mixed per genetic line (77 hens of the H and L line and 201 or 206 hens of the LSL line, respectively, per pen) in 8 pens of 2 aviary systems differing in design. Keel bone status and body mass of 20 focal hens per lin...
11 CitationsSource
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