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Marinus L. de Jager
Stellenbosch University
PollinatorPollinationEcologyMimicryBiology
18Publications
8H-index
207Citations
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Publications 19
Newest
#1Bruce Anderson (Stellenbosch University)H-Index: 18
#2Marinus L. de Jager (Stellenbosch University)H-Index: 8
Biological mimicry has served as a salient example of natural selection for over a century, providing us with a dazzling array of very different examples across many unrelated taxa. We provide a conceptual framework that brings together apparently disparate examples of mimicry in a single model for the purpose of comparing how natural selection affects models, mimics and signal receivers across different interactions. We first analyse how model-mimic resemblance likely affects the fitness of mod...
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#2Corneile MinnaarH-Index: 3
Last. Bruce AndersonH-Index: 18
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#1Corneile Minnaar (Stellenbosch University)H-Index: 3
#2Marinus L. de Jager (Stellenbosch University)H-Index: 8
Last. Bruce Anderson (Stellenbosch University)H-Index: 18
view all 3 authors...
2 CitationsSource
#1Marinus L. de Jager (Stellenbosch University)H-Index: 8
#2Bruce Anderson (Stellenbosch University)H-Index: 18
3 CitationsSource
#1Keanu Martin (Stellenbosch University)
#2Corneile Minnaar (Stellenbosch University)H-Index: 3
Last. Bruce Anderson (Stellenbosch University)H-Index: 18
view all 4 authors...
Blueberry plants require large quantities of pollen deposited on stigmas to produce commercial-quality fruit. Like many agricultural crops, the interaction between pollen-source variety and pollen-recipient variety can be a major determinant of fruit quality in blueberries. However, little information exists to guide growers in optimising fruit set and quality. Using five commonly grown blueberry varieties, I determined whether crossing between varieties (inter-varietal) increased fruit mass and...
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#1Keanu Martin (Stellenbosch University)
#2Bruce Anderson (Stellenbosch University)H-Index: 18
Last. Marinus L. de Jager (Stellenbosch University)H-Index: 8
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Animal-mediated pollination is an essential ecosystem service which over a third of the world9s agricultural crops depend on. Blueberry fruit production is highly dependent on pollinators and in their native range they are pollinated mostly by bumble bees (Bombus spp.). Demand for blueberries has increased in recent years due to their perceived health benefits. Consequently, blueberry cultivation has expanded well beyond their native range, including several regions where bumble bees are not pre...
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#1Corneile Minnaar (Stellenbosch University)H-Index: 3
#2Bruce Anderson (Stellenbosch University)H-Index: 18
Last. Jeffrey D. Karron (UWM: University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee)H-Index: 24
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7 CitationsSource
#1Marinus L. de Jager (Stellenbosch University)H-Index: 8
#2Rodney Peakall (ANU: Australian National University)H-Index: 31
Background and Aims:Selection exerted by pollinators on flowers is predicted to occur along two distinct axes. While pollinator attraction to flowers is governed by pollinator preferences, pollen transfer efficiency is mediated by the mechanical fit of pollinators to flower morphology. Although pollinator attraction in sexually deceptive orchids is typically underpinned by floral odour, morphological traits are expected to play a vital role in mechanical fit during floral contact with pollinator...
7 CitationsSource
#1Marinus L. de Jager (Stellenbosch University)H-Index: 8
#2Edward Willis-Jones (University of Cambridge)H-Index: 1
Last. Beverley J. Glover (University of Cambridge)H-Index: 36
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Linear areas of contrasting floral colour, or “nectar guides”, are recognized to enhance pollinator attraction. Few studies, however, have investigated the role of other types of floral marking in pollinator behaviour. In this study, we explore the impact of petal spots and petal rings on bumblebee foraging dynamics. Using model flowers with discrete spot or bullseye ring patterns we investigate the responses of Bombus terrestris foragers towards rewarding and unrewarding flowers. We find that t...
11 CitationsSource
#1Marinus L. de Jager (Stellenbosch University)H-Index: 8
#2Allan G. Ellis (Stellenbosch University)H-Index: 18
Abstract The Greater Cape Floristic Region (GCFR) in South Africa has been extensively investigated for its phenomenal angiosperm diversity. A key emergent pattern is the occurrence of older plant lineages in the southern Fynbos biome and younger lineages in the northern Succulent Karoo biome. We know practically nothing, however, about the evolutionary history of the animals that pollinate this often highly-specialized flora. In this study, we explore the evolutionary history of an important GC...
1 CitationsSource
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