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Joseph Henrich
Harvard University
SociologyPsychologyCognitionSociocultural evolutionSocial psychology
206Publications
62H-index
23.9kCitations
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Publications 201
Newest
#1Michael Muthukrishna (LSE: London School of Economics and Political Science)H-Index: 10
#2Adrian Bell (UofU: University of Utah)H-Index: 13
Last. Braden Thue (Harvard University)H-Index: 1
view all 7 authors...
In this article, we present a tool and a method for measuring the psychological and cultural distance between societies and creating a distance scale with any population as the point of comparison....
1 CitationsSource
#1Edmond Awad (University of Exeter)H-Index: 6
#2Sohan Dsouza (MIT: Massachusetts Institute of Technology)H-Index: 8
Last. Iyad Rahwan (MIT: Massachusetts Institute of Technology)H-Index: 34
view all 8 authors...
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#2Adrian BellH-Index: 1
Last. Braden ThueH-Index: 1
view all 7 authors...
We present a tool and method for measuring the psychological and cultural distance between societies and creating a distance scale with any population as the point of comparison. Since psychological data is dominated by samples drawn from WEIRD nations, and overwhelmingly, the United States, we focus on distance from the US. We also present distance from China, the largest population, second largest economy, and common cultural comparison. We apply the fixation index (F_ST), a meaningful statist...
7 CitationsSource
#1Zachary Witkower (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 4
#2Jessica L. Tracy (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 38
Last. Joseph Henrich (Harvard University)H-Index: 62
view all 4 authors...
Converging evidence suggests that high rank is communicated through various nonverbal behaviors (e.g., expansiveness), but prior studies have not examined whether 2 distinct forms of high rank—known as prestige and dominance—are communicated through distinct nonverbal displays. Given the divergent messages that prestigious and dominant leaders need to send in order to attain and retain their place in the social hierarchy, theoretical accounts would suggest that individuals use distinct sets of n...
9 CitationsSource
#1Jonathan Schulz (GMU: George Mason University)H-Index: 7
#2Duman Bahrami-Rad (Harvard University)H-Index: 3
Last. Joseph Henrich (CIFAR: Canadian Institute for Advanced Research)H-Index: 62
view all 4 authors...
INTRODUCTION A growing body of research suggests that populations around the globe vary substantially along several important psychological dimensions and that populations characterized as Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich, and Democratic (WEIRD) are particularly unusual. People from these societies tend to be more individualistic, independent, and impersonally prosocial (e.g., trusting of strangers) while revealing less conformity and in-group loyalty. Although these patterns are now well...
14 CitationsSource
#1Rahul Bhui (Harvard University)H-Index: 4
#2Maciej ChudekH-Index: 8
Last. Joseph Henrich (CIFAR: Canadian Institute for Advanced Research)H-Index: 62
view all 3 authors...
Does integration into commercial markets lead people to work longer hours? Does this mean that people in more subsistence-oriented societies work less compared to those in more market-integrated societies? Despite their venerable status in both anthropology and economic history, these questions have been difficult to address due to a dearth of appropriate data. Here, we tackle the issue by combining high-quality time allocation datasets from 8 small-scale populations around the world (45,019 obs...
Source
#1Rahul Bhui (Harvard University)H-Index: 4
#2Maciej ChudekH-Index: 8
Last. Joseph Henrich (Harvard University)H-Index: 62
view all 3 authors...
Cooperation plays a crucial role in primate social life. However, the evolution of large-scale human cooperation from the cognitive fundamentals found in other primates remains an evolutionary puzzle. Most theoretical work focuses on positive reciprocity (helping) or coordinated punishment by assuming well-defined social roles or institutions (e.g., punishment pools), sophisticated cognitive abilities for navigating these, and sufficiently harmonious communities to allow for mutual aid. Here we ...
3 CitationsSource
#1Martin Lang (Masaryk University)H-Index: 6
#2Benjamin Grant Purzycki (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 14
Last. Joseph Henrich (Harvard University)H-Index: 62
view all 20 authors...
The emergence of large-scale cooperation during the Holocene remains a central problem in the evolutionary literature. One hypothesis points to culturally evolved beliefs in punishing, interventionist gods that facilitate the extension of cooperative behaviour toward geographically distant co-religionists. Furthermore, another hypothesis points to such mechanisms being constrained to the religious ingroup, possibly at the expense of religious outgroups. To test these hypotheses, we administered ...
2 CitationsSource
#1Michael Muthukrishna (LSE: London School of Economics and Political Science)H-Index: 10
#2Joseph Henrich (CIFAR: Canadian Institute for Advanced Research)H-Index: 62
The replication crisis facing the psychological sciences is widely regarded as rooted in methodological or statistical shortcomings. We argue that a large part of the problem is the lack of a cumulative theoretical framework or frameworks. Without an overarching theoretical framework that generates hypotheses across diverse domains, empirical programs spawn and grow from personal intuitions and culturally biased folk theories. By providing ways to develop clear predictions, including through the...
17 CitationsSource
#1Joseph Henrich (CIFAR: Canadian Institute for Advanced Research)H-Index: 62
#2Michal Bauer (Charles University in Prague)H-Index: 10
Last. Benjamin Grant Purzycki (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 14
view all 5 authors...
Does the experience of war increase people’s religiosity? Much evidence supports the idea that particular religious beliefs and ritual forms can galvanize social solidarity and motivate in-group cooperation, thus facilitating a wide range of cooperative behaviours including—but not limited to—peaceful resistance and collective aggression. However, little work has focused on whether violent conflict, in turn, might fuel greater religious participation. Here, we analyse survey data from 1,709 indi...
3 CitationsSource
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