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Johnny A. Waters
Appalachian State University
76Publications
14H-index
575Citations
Publications 76
Newest
Published on Jul 16, 2019in Palaeontology2.63
Jennifer E. Bauer (Florida Museum of Natural History), Johnny A. Waters14
Estimated H-index: 14
(ASU: Appalachian State University),
Colin D. Sumrall19
Estimated H-index: 19
(UT: University of Tennessee)
Published on Jul 1, 2019in Global and Planetary Change4.10
Sarah K. Carmichael7
Estimated H-index: 7
(ASU: Appalachian State University),
Johnny A. Waters14
Estimated H-index: 14
(ASU: Appalachian State University)
+ 2 AuthorsErika Kido6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of Graz)
Abstract The Late Devonian (383-359 Ma) was a time of prolonged climate instability with catastrophic perturbation of global marine ecosystems at the Frasnian-Famennian (F-F) and the Devonian-Carboniferous (D-C) boundaries. The causes and mechanisms of anoxia and extinction at the F-F interval are not clearly delineated, and alternative explanations for virtually every aspect of this interval are still intensely debated. In many (but not all) locations, the F-F interval is characterized by two d...
Published on Apr 1, 2019in Global and Planetary Change4.10
Olivia C. Paschall1
Estimated H-index: 1
(ASU: Appalachian State University),
Sarah K. Carmichael7
Estimated H-index: 7
(ASU: Appalachian State University)
+ 4 AuthorsAllison Dombrowski (ASU: Appalachian State University)
Abstract The Devonian-Carboniferous transition (359 Ma) was a time of extreme climate and faunal change and is associated with the end-Devonian biodiversity crisis. The transition is characterized by transgressive/regressive cycles, which culminated in the onset of widespread ocean anoxia (the Hangenberg Black Shale event) and a remarkable sea-level fall close to the Devonian-Carboniferous boundary (the Hangenberg Sandstone event); together these are known as the Hangenberg Crisis. The Hangenber...
Published on Mar 1, 2019in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology2.62
Thomas J. Suttner8
Estimated H-index: 8
(University of Graz),
Erika Kido6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of Graz)
+ 10 AuthorsLadislav Slavík13
Estimated H-index: 13
Abstract Upper Devonian marine deposits of the Baruunhuurai Terrane in western Mongolia represent island arc settings, which yielded a diverse conodont assemblage of 30 taxa, including species of Ancyrognathus (as well as one new species), Icriodus , Mehlina , Polygnathus and Palmatolepis . Biodiversity analysis of Ancyrognathus , Pelekysgnathus , Mehlina and Icriodus shows that the Mongolian conodont assemblage consists of two endemic and few cosmopolitan taxa. Representatives of the otherwise ...
Published on Dec 1, 2018in Swiss Journal of Palaeontology
Stephen K. Donovan20
Estimated H-index: 20
(Naturalis),
Johnny A. Waters14
Estimated H-index: 14
(ASU: Appalachian State University),
Mark S. Pankowski
Trombonicrinus (col.) hanshessi gen. et sp. nov. is a crinoid species of unusual morphology and is based solely on the stem. It comes from the (probably Lower) Devonian of Tafraoute, Anti Atlas Mountains, Morocco. It is a long crinoid stem of circular section, tapering distally throughout, with a tight curvature through 180o between the mesistele and proxistele; attachment is distally by short, pointed, unsegmented pseudoradices. The overall appearance is reminiscent of the slide of a trombone. ...
Johnny A. Waters14
Estimated H-index: 14
,
Christian Klug25
Estimated H-index: 25
Two Emsian species of crinoids, Kroppocrinus garamdouaraensis n. sp. and Elicrinus? weyeri, and two species of blastoids, Pentremitidea pailleti (Emsian) and Hyperoblastus clavatus (Givetian), are described herein from the Tafilalt of Morocco. The crinoid records expand the sparse record of Devonian crinoids within Morocco; the blastoids represent the first report of this class from the Anti-Atlas and probably northern Africa. Key words: Crinoidea, Blastoidea, Emsian, Givetian, Anti-Atlas, Tafil...
Published on Jan 1, 2018
David L. Meyer18
Estimated H-index: 18
,
Johnny A. Waters14
Estimated H-index: 14
Published on Sep 1, 2017in Geological Journal1.95
Olivia C. Paschall1
Estimated H-index: 1
(ASU: Appalachian State University),
Johnny A. Waters14
Estimated H-index: 14
(ASU: Appalachian State University)
Crinoids have the ability to regenerate their crowns when arms are autotomized or bitten off by predators. The evidence of predation is visible in many populations of crinoids, including the deep water stalked crinoid Democrinus off the coast of Roatan, Honduras. Throughout the videos taken in a submersible, many individuals displayed arms that are significantly shorter relative to their stalk lengths than the full-grown adults in the area, indicating arm regeneration. Some individuals were miss...
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