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Stephen M. Patterson
Ohio University
39Publications
17H-index
1,018Citations
Publications 39
Newest
Abstract. The effects of 12 hr nicotine administration and abstinence on stress-induced cardiovascular reactivity were assessed within Light/Intermittent cigarette smokers and Habitual cigarette smokers. One hundred thirty-two male smokers (66 Habitual, 66 Light/Intermittent) were assigned to a Nicotine (21 mg) or Placebo patch condition. Cardiovascular reactivity was assessed during Baseline, a 6-min mental arithmetic task (Paced Auditory Serial Arithmetic Task) and a 5-min mirror-tracing task ...
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#1Anthony W. Austin (University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff)H-Index: 6
#2Stephen M. Patterson (OU: Ohio University)H-Index: 17
Last.Roland von Känel (University of Bern)H-Index: 47
view all 3 authors...
In their recent letter regarding our 2011 review article [1], Engan and Schagatay [2] suggest that spleen-induced increases in erythrocyte concentration may be partly responsible for stress-hemoconcentration. They rightly state that, due to a release of erythrocytes into the blood, hemoconcentration occurs as a result of spleen contraction during physiological stressors such as exercise [3] or apneic diving [3, 4]. Moreover, the spleen is sympathetically innervated [3] and catecholamine infusion...
1 CitationsSource
#1Anthony W. Austin (University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff)H-Index: 6
#2Michael R. Kushnick (OU: Ohio University)H-Index: 10
Last.Stephen M. Patterson (OU: Ohio University)H-Index: 17
view all 5 authors...
Abstract. Prior research suggests that hyperlipidemia is associated with elevated blood pressure responses to acute stress but whether lipid levels influence underlying cardiac and vascular determinants of blood pressure during stress is not known. Thus, we examined whether lipids were associated with stress-induced blood pressure responses and responses of stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO), and total peripheral resistance (TPR). In 19 healthy university students (15 men), blood was drawn ...
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4 CitationsSource
#1Anthony W. Austin (Concordia University)H-Index: 6
#2Stephen M. Patterson (OU: Ohio University)H-Index: 17
When examining stress effects on coagulation, arithmetic correction is typically used to adjust for concomitant hemoconcentration but may be inappropriate for coagulation activity assays. We examined a new physiologically relevant method of correcting for stress-hemoconcentration. Blood was drawn from healthy men (N = 40) during baseline, mental stress, and recovery, and factor VII activity (FVII:C), factor VIII activity (FVIII:C), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), prothrombin time (...
2 CitationsSource
#1Anthony W. AustinH-Index: 6
#2Petra H. WirtzH-Index: 21
Last.Roland von KänelH-Index: 47
view all 5 authors...
1 CitationsSource
Introduction: The goal of this study was to examine a new physiologically relevant method of correcting for hemoconcentration effects on stress-induced changes in coagulation parameters (i.e., activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), prothrombin time (PT%), FVIII:C, and FVII:C). Hypotheses: We hypothesized that 1) Area-under-the-curve (AUC) for uncorrected PT% and FVII:C would be greater than AUC corrected arithmetically or with saline or plasma, 2) AUC for APTT uncorrected or corrected wit...
#1Anthony W. AustinH-Index: 6
#2Petra H. WirtzH-Index: 21
Last.Roland von KänelH-Index: 47
view all 5 authors...
For the examination of psychological stress effects on coagulation, the Dill and Costill correction (DCC) for hemoconcentration effects has been used to adjust for stress-induced plasma volume changes. Although the correction is appropriate for adjusting concentrations of various large blood constituents, it may be inappropriate for time-dependent or functional coagulation assays. Two new plasma reconstitution techniques for correcting hemoconcentration effects on stress-induced changes in coagu...
13 CitationsSource
#1Anthony W. Austin (OU: Ohio University)H-Index: 6
#2Stephen M. Patterson (OU: Ohio University)H-Index: 17
Last.Roland von KänelH-Index: 47
view all 3 authors...
Background Acute psychological stress can produce significant hemoconcentration as well as prothrombotic changes in blood, both of which may have potentially harmful effects on the cardiovascular system. It is unclear whether these effects are independent or have influence on each other.
23 CitationsSource
#1Stephen M. Patterson (OU: Ohio University)H-Index: 17
#2Deborah E. SpinksH-Index: 1
The present study was designed to examine factors that could facilitate or impede adherence to proper hydration. Forty volunteers (20 male, 20 female) were randomly assigned to one of two groups: Informed Group (n = 20) and Uninformed Group (n = 20). Bioelectrical impedance was used to measure intracellular (ICW) and extracellular (ECW) body water at Time 1 and 2. Personality, health beliefs, and health behaviors inventories were administered at Time 1. A health information brochure on proper hy...
3 CitationsSource
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