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Xing Xu
Chinese Academy of Sciences
187Publications
41H-index
6,157Citations
Publications 187
Newest
Published on Feb 4, 2019in Scientific Reports4.01
Thomas G. Kaye9
Estimated H-index: 9
(AmeriCorps VISTA),
Michael Pittman9
Estimated H-index: 9
(HKU: University of Hong Kong)
+ 2 AuthorsXing Xu41
Estimated H-index: 41
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
In 1862, a fossil feather from the Solnhofen quarries was described as the holotype of the iconic Archaeopteryx lithographica. The isolated feather’s identification has been problematic, and the fossil was considered either a primary, secondary or, most recently, a primary covert. The specimen is surrounded by the ‘mystery of the missing quill’. The calamus described in the original paper is unseen today, even under x-ray fluorescence and UV imaging, challenging its original existence. We answer...
Published on Mar 22, 2019in Scientific Reports4.01
Xi Yao (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences), Chun-Chi Liao (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)+ 1 AuthorsXing Xu41
Estimated H-index: 41
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Therizinosaurian theropods evolved many highly specialized osteological features in association with their bulky proportions, which were unusual in the context of the generally gracile Theropoda. Here we report a new therizinosaur, Lingyuanosaurus sihedangensis gen. et sp. nov., based on a specimen recovered from the Lower Cretaceous Jehol Group of Lingyuan, Liaoning Province, China, which displays a combination of plesiomorphic and derived features. Most notably, the specimen is characterized b...
Published in Scientific Reports4.01
Zichuan Qin (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences), James M. Clark36
Estimated H-index: 36
(GW: George Washington University)
+ -3 AuthorsXing Xu41
Estimated H-index: 41
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Alvarezsaurian dinosaurs, a group of bizarre theropods with greatly shortened and modified forelimbs, are known mostly from the Cretaceous of Asia and South America. Here we report a new alvarezsaurian, Shishugounykus inexpectus gen. et sp. nov, based on a specimen recovered from the Middle–Upper Jurassic Shishugou Formation of the Junggar Basin, western China. Together with two other alvarezsaurians from this formation, i.e., Haplocheirus sollers and Aorun zhaoi, these Shishugou forms represent...
Published on Jun 11, 2019in Nature43.07
Min Wang11
Estimated H-index: 11
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Jingmai K. O’Connor9
Estimated H-index: 9
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 1 AuthorsZHOUZhonghe47
Estimated H-index: 47
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Change history: In this Letter, it should have been acknowledged that the silhouettes of Scansoriopterygidae in Fig. 3a were modified from a sketch by Jaime Headden. The original Letter has been corrected online.
Published on May 10, 2019in bioRxiv
Anyang Ding (HKU: University of Hong Kong), Michael Pittman9
Estimated H-index: 9
(HKU: University of Hong Kong)
+ 3 AuthorsXing Xu41
Estimated H-index: 41
ABSTRACT The Coelurosauria are a group of mostly feathered theropods that gave rise to birds, the only dinosaurs that survived the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event and are still found today. Between their first appearance in the Middle Jurassic up to the end Cretaceous, coelurosaurs were party to dramatic geographic changes on the Earth’s surface, including the breakup of the supercontinent Pangaea, and the formation of the Atlantic Ocean. These plate tectonic events are thought to have cau...
Published on May 1, 2019in Chinese Science Bulletin
Xing Xu41
Estimated H-index: 41
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Xing Xu
Published on May 1, 2019in Nature43.07
Min Wang30
Estimated H-index: 30
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Min Wang11
Estimated H-index: 11
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 1 AuthorsZHOUZhonghe47
Estimated H-index: 47
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Powered flight evolved independently in vertebrates in the pterosaurs, birds and bats, each of which has a different configuration of the bony elements and epidermal structures that form the wings1,2. Whereas the early fossil records of pterosaurs and bats are sparse, mounting evidence (primarily from China) of feathered non-avian dinosaurs and stemward avians that derive primarily from the Middle–Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous periods has enabled the slow piecing together of the origins of...
Published on Mar 1, 2019in Cretaceous Research2.12
MartinGLockley38
Estimated H-index: 38
(University of Colorado Denver),
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Xing Xu41
Estimated H-index: 41
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Abstract The vertebrate track Laiyangpus liui , from the Lower Cretaceous of Shandong Province in China has been the subject of misunderstanding and misinterpretation since it was discovered and named in 1960, and reposited in the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology collections in Beijing. It was initially misinterpreted as evidence of a coelurosaurian (non-avian theropod) trackmaker supposedly showing evidence of tridactyl manus and tetradactyl pes. This discredited concl...
Yanhong Pan13
Estimated H-index: 13
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Wenxia Zheng10
Estimated H-index: 10
(NCSU: North Carolina State University)
+ 13 AuthorsJingmai K. O’Connor9
Estimated H-index: 9
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Dinosaur fossils possessing integumentary appendages of various morphologies, interpreted as feathers, have greatly enhanced our understanding of the evolutionary link between birds and dinosaurs, as well as the origins of feathers and avian flight. In extant birds, the unique expression and amino acid composition of proteins in mature feathers have been shown to determine their biomechanical properties, such as hardness, resilience, and plasticity. Here, we provide molecular and ultrastructural...
Published on Jan 1, 2019in Acta Palaeontologica Polonica1.64
Qi Zhao8
Estimated H-index: 8
,
Michael J. Benton66
Estimated H-index: 66
+ 1 AuthorsXing Xu41
Estimated H-index: 41
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