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Xing Xu
Chinese Academy of Sciences
198Publications
44H-index
7,220Citations
Publications 202
Newest
#1Jinyou Mo (AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 8
Last.Xing Xu (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 44
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Abstract We describe a large, nearly completely preserved sauropod humerus from the Lower Cretaceous Xinlong Formation of Napai Basin, Fusui County, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, southern China. It was excavated from the quarry that produced the holotypic specimen of the titanosauriform Fusuisaurus zhaoi. With a preserved length of 183.5 cm, the newly collected humerus is tentatively referred to and supports a giant size of Fusuisaurus zhaoi, which increases our knowledge of the diversity of...
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#1Arindam Roy (HKU: University of Hong Kong)H-Index: 1
#2Michael Pittman (HKU: University of Hong Kong)H-Index: 11
Last.Xing Xu (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 44
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1 CitationsSource
#1Hui DaiH-Index: 7
#2Roger B. J. Benson (University of Oxford)H-Index: 35
Last.Xing Xu (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 44
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Tetanurae is a special group of theropod dinosaurs that originated by the late Early Jurassic. It includes several early-diverging groups of generally large-bodied predators (megalosauroids, allosauroids, tyrannosauroid coelurosaurs) as well as morphologically disparate small-bodied coelurosaurs, including birds. Aspects of the evolutionary history of tetanurans remain contested, including the topology of their deep phylogenetic divergences (among Megalosauroidea, Allosauroidea and Coelurosauria...
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#1Fenglu Han (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 12
#2Xing Xu (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 44
Last.Rui Wu (China University of Geosciences)
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#1Thomas G. Kaye (AmeriCorps VISTA)H-Index: 10
#2Michael Pittman (HKU: University of Hong Kong)H-Index: 11
Last.Xing Xu (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 44
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In 1862, a fossil feather from the Solnhofen quarries was described as the holotype of the iconic Archaeopteryx lithographica. The isolated feather’s identification has been problematic, and the fossil was considered either a primary, secondary or, most recently, a primary covert. The specimen is surrounded by the ‘mystery of the missing quill’. The calamus described in the original paper is unseen today, even under x-ray fluorescence and UV imaging, challenging its original existence. We answer...
2 CitationsSource
#1Xi Yao (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 1
#2Chun-Chi Liao (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 1
Last.Xing Xu (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 44
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Therizinosaurian theropods evolved many highly specialized osteological features in association with their bulky proportions, which were unusual in the context of the generally gracile Theropoda. Here we report a new therizinosaur, Lingyuanosaurus sihedangensis gen. et sp. nov., based on a specimen recovered from the Lower Cretaceous Jehol Group of Lingyuan, Liaoning Province, China, which displays a combination of plesiomorphic and derived features. Most notably, the specimen is characterized b...
1 CitationsSource
#1Zichuan Qin (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
#2James M. Clark (GW: George Washington University)H-Index: 38
Last.Xing Xu (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 44
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Alvarezsaurian dinosaurs, a group of bizarre theropods with greatly shortened and modified forelimbs, are known mostly from the Cretaceous of Asia and South America. Here we report a new alvarezsaurian, Shishugounykus inexpectus gen. et sp. nov, based on a specimen recovered from the Middle–Upper Jurassic Shishugou Formation of the Junggar Basin, western China. Together with two other alvarezsaurians from this formation, i.e., Haplocheirus sollers and Aorun zhaoi, these Shishugou forms represent...
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#1Taiping Gao (Capital Normal University)H-Index: 11
#2Xiangchu Yin (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 3
Last.Dong Ren (Capital Normal University)H-Index: 27
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Due to a lack of Mesozoic fossil records, the origins and early evolution of feather-feeding behaviors by insects are obscure. Here, we report ten nymph specimens of a new lineage of insect, Mesophthirus engeli gen et. sp. nov. within Mesophthiridae fam. nov. from the mid-Cretaceous (ca. 100 Mya) Myanmar (Burmese) amber. This new insect clade shows a series of ectoparasitic morphological characters such as tiny wingless body, head with strong chewing mouthparts, robust and short antennae having ...
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#1Han Hu (UNE: University of New England (United States))H-Index: 1
#2Gabriele Sansalone (UNE: University of New England (United States))H-Index: 6
Last.ZHOUZhonghe (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 47
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Most living birds exhibit cranial kinesis—movement between the rostrum and braincase—in which force is transferred through the palatal and jugal bars. The palate alone distinguishes the Paleognathae from the Neognathae, with cranial kinesis more developed in neognaths. Most previous palatal studies were based on 2D data and rarely incorporated data from stem birds despite great interest in their kinetic abilities. Here we reconstruct the vomer of the Early Cretaceous stem bird Sapeornis and the ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Min Wang (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 24
#2Jingmai K. O’Connor (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 26
Last.ZHOUZhonghe (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 47
view all 4 authors...
Change history: In this Letter, it should have been acknowledged that the silhouettes of Scansoriopterygidae in Fig. 3a were modified from a sketch by Jaime Headden. The original Letter has been corrected online.
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