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Michael Singh
University of Sydney
177Publications
19H-index
1,288Citations
Publications 177
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#1Jing Qi (RMIT: RMIT University)H-Index: 4
#2Catherine Manathunga (VU: Victoria University, Australia)H-Index: 18
Last.Tracey Bunda (University of Southern Queensland)H-Index: 2
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Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide a micro historical account of the work of a key Chinese educational reformer, Tao Xingzhi (18911946), who transformed educational ideas from John Dewey to effect social and cultural change in 1920s1940s China. Design/methodology/approach: This paper examines English and Chinese language sources, including Taos poetry, to present a fresh analysis of Taos epistemological life history. It draws upon transnational historical approaches to chart the mu...
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#1Catherine Manathunga (University of the Sunshine Coast)H-Index: 18
#2Jing Qi (RMIT: RMIT University)H-Index: 4
Last.Michael Singh (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 19
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ABSTRACTIn this article, we introduce a time mapping methodology to chart the impact of transcultural and First Nations’ histories, geographies and cultural knowledges on doctoral education. Drawin...
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#1Son Truong (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 5
#2Michael Singh (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 19
Last.Kumara S Ward (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 3
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2 CitationsSource
#1Michael Singh (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 19
#2Thị Hồng Nhung Nguyễn (USYD: University of Sydney)
Education research is a vehicle for furthering methods of critical thinking. This chapter provides an overview of the flexible research design employed in this study for producing knowledge about educating teachers capable of localising Chinese to make it learnable. It presents the research plan for studying the professional learning of emergent teachers through working with beginning learners of Chinese and their engagement with related teacher-research practices. This chapter also analyses som...
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#1Michael Singh (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 19
#2Tonia Gray (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 13
Last.Greg Downey (Macquarie University)H-Index: 12
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This chapter raises provocative ideas, moving briskly through them inviting engagement in further research and teaching in local/global education policy practice. A new generation of local/global education is warranted if higher education academics and students are to explore the deep fractures in the politics and the economics that are dividing nations, internally and externally. University students (and academics) now live in a world where authoritarianism is on the rise as public faith in dem...
1 CitationsSource
#1Peta Salter (JCU: James Cook University)H-Index: 5
#2Kelsey Halbert (JCU: James Cook University)H-Index: 3
Last.Jinghe Han (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 6
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Higher education is increasingly focusing on facilitating agentic, outward-looking, globally minded graduates. International mobility experiences are positioned as key to developing these qualities; however, not all students have the inclination, resources, or support to enable them to participate in such experiences. Student surveys reveal that the top barriers to participation—time, finances, work, and family commitments—are outside the influence of educators. In response, educators need to lo...
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#1Greg Downey (Macquarie University)H-Index: 12
#2Tonia Gray (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 13
Last.Michael Singh (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 19
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The volume of university students travelling overseas has increased rapidly in recent decades. Student flows are asymmetrical: Students from wealthy nations disproportionately study in the Global North, and students from developing economies travel to more industrialized countries, especially English-speaking, to pursue degrees. This pattern, however, is shifting towards Asia, with a growing sense that students need greater cross-cultural skills and familiarity with the region. Ambitious univers...
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#1Michael Singh (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 19
#2Thị Hồng Nhung Nguyễn (USYD: University of Sydney)
Localising the teaching/learning of Chinese is being made by the globalisation of China. The growing capacity of China in knowledge production warrants teaching school students to use Chinese as a local language. This chapter presents several practical ideas that are worth testing and elaborating in these changing educational circumstances: globalising the connections between Chinese and non-Chinese peoples, sponsoring Chinese language learning, folding Chinese into students’ daily sociolinguist...
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#1Michael Singh (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 19
#2Thị Hồng Nhung Nguyễn (USYD: University of Sydney)
This chapter reports on a range of post-monolingual practices used for teaching students how to learn Chinese by teacher-researchers from China. These emergent teachers engage in professional learning through planning how to teach students to learn and use Chinese in their everyday local situations. Demonstrating their knowledge for generating and teaching curriculum content by planning and designing student-centred, learning-focused lessons is part of their teacher education research. Their stu...
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#1Michael Singh (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 19
Within the Anglosphere, globalization is sometimes understood as in terms of Australia, Canada, the USA, and New Zealand engaging the politics and economics of Asia. In what is arguably the second global Asian century, Anglophone nations are confronted with the growing political, economic, and military influence of Asian governments, economies, migrant workers, students and tourists. Where current growth is hugely dependant on China and living standards falling throughout the Anglosphere, what h...
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